Hi Guest, Welcome to the quilting forums, register now —or—

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Mini farm

  1. #11
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    6,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    I'm going to assume (since you said recently an empty nester) that you are around 40-50. Lots of energy still. So at 60 that energy will begin to wain and 70 it is nearly gone. So , saying that, let me tell you about some of your questions.
    The pool is going to take up 3 hours of your day to keep It pretty and swimmable. Chemicals, vacuuming, deck, etc.
    Chickens don't take up much time unless you have to muck the chickenhouse. If you let them roam, you have critter problems like foxes and coyotes and possums, but that's a small dilemma. Rabbits, pretty easy if they don't get sick but you can always kill them off. Eggs are not cheap to get because the chickens need scratch feed and laying mash so if you think you'll save money...you're wrong.
    Pygmy goats are fun. We had a herd of a dozen for years. They kept the forest from getting that tangly undergrowth but tried some larger goats (for about a month) and they were killing off the trees, stripping bark and basically hard to manage. Pygmy goats have a high content of butterfat in their milk so are excellent if you want to make cheese, but then..you have to milk them. You can sell the babies as pets. Don't plan on having any flowers if you have goats...they will eat them all.
    Do I sound negative? I'm not...I just remember buying this 40 acres 40 years ago and ours is mostly woods. Mowing our 5 cleared acres in the good weather is a full time job. Can't imagine if we had more cleared land. We have the pool and a small farm house. Our first purchase was a used old tractor that needed tires. Tires cost more than we paid for the tractor. We have since had to buy an excavator, a four wheeler, another tractor and several trailers to haul stuff.
    If something happed to DH, I cannot stay here. I cannot maintain the driveway , let alone the yard. The forest takes care of itself, unless a tree falls and needs to be cut up.
    Oh yes, and how far will you be from town? You'll need to learn to stock up on supplies because if you are far you can't just run out for more bread. Also, will you need to burn wood when its cold. I knw Georgia doesn't get real cold but if your power goes out, are you thinking ahead.
    I started writing a book once called "so you want to move to the country". I was 34 then. I've had to learn so much. But, if you are doing this on your own, I would look into an intern program of young people that want to learn to farm and will come and live on your farm and garden and plant and do animal work in exchange for mostly living room and board.
    You are brave if you think you can handle this all on your own.
    Again, sort of depends on how old you are and how well you are and how much money you can put into this project. It won't be cheap or easy.

  2. #12
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    3,325
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    You can check with your local Extension office. Many times they will offer programs for hobby farmers etc.
    “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

    ― Albert Pine

  3. #13
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4,975
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    Quote Originally Posted by jjkaiser View Post
    Wow! I have absolutely no advice but I am in awe of your wanting to tackle this. You are right. It's exciting and terrifying and you are gonna have your hands full for a long time. I wish you all the luck in the world. (As for me, I would just turn that barn into a giant sewing studio and have lots of dogs running around. I would be in heaven.)
    I agree with everything you said!
    Vonnie

  4. #14
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8,912
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    Farming is not for the faint of heart. It's a full time job which requires commitment. If you're empty nesters with the hope of traveling or enjoying retirement, forget it! One of the forum members here raises goats; maybe you could get pointers from her. It seems the internet would be the best place to start for info. on all the things you're interested in doing.

    DH & I live in the city. Our property is ~1/3 an acre. When I was young, I could work in the flower beds for 3 hrs. in the a.m., eat lunch, take a shower, & go to work at the hosp. for an 8 hr. shift. Huh! Those were the days. Now I'm 76 & no longer have the time or energy to keep up with the flower beds. This spring I'll be getting an estimate from a landscaper to have some of them dug up & sod installed. You have to look years ahead.

    My sis & BIL had cattle & sheep. They lived in OR on 20 acres. It takes constant vigilance, feeding, assisting with birthing of animals, vet bills, etc. It's definitely not for the faint of heart. I would think long & hard about taking on 25 acres & animals.

  5. #15
    Applique Angel

    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Villa Rica, GA
    Posts
    356
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    It’s been said before, but you guys are awesome! Thank you for all the encouragement and advice!

    Grammaterry - I do not think you are being harsh at all, everything you said are things DH and I have talked about.

    A little more backstory for you....

    I will not be on my own! DH and I are in our mid 40’s. While I joked about being empty nesters we will hardly be alone, at least not for several years. One of the big reasons we are doing this is to bring the kids closer. The pool house will be remodeled immediately so that DD and new husband to be (6/20/19) can move in. We are doing this to help them save money to get them set up for the future. They are both 23 and have been dating for 8 yrs. Plus I’m hoping with a “babysitter” just right across the walkway I might get a grandbaby! DS is 18 and this summer he is moving into the frat house at college. The school is only about 45 mins away, and with 2 fully stocked lakes plus the pool he will be home a lot! My mom moved in with me 2 yrs ago after my grandma passed. I also have my sweet sweet DH. He is not unwilling or uninterested he is just really busy with his full time job. While he does work from home he usually travels one week out of the month.

    I will have a lot of help in the evenings and weekends, but during the weekdays it’ll mostly be just me.

    Another reason for the purchase of land is to have something to leave behind.

    Dealing with the “ugly” part of raising animals will not be a problem. We do hunt and I process what is brought home. So that is something I am already accustomed too. We do have great respect for the land and animals. We are not wasteful and do not take more than we need for our family.

    We have had many family meetings to make sure that everyone is on board with this.

    I definitely will be starting out small with the animals. I do not want to get overwhelmed!

    Pool maintenance falls on future son in law. He has had pools his whole life so he gets that chore. Mom can’t do any heavy lifting, but there will be plenty of small things for her to work on. I will get the main animal care and most of the mowing. I can’t wait to go pick out a tractor! We were joking the other day saying I was going to be a little 85 yr old lady mowing in my air conditioned tractor. Can you just picture it?

    There is a wood stove in the living room so yes we will be going through some firewood. We currently have a portable generator, but will be looking into installing a whole home generator ran of LP for emergencies. Also a windmill and/or solar panels is something else we will be doing at some point. Other than the pool house there are no major remodeling that Has to be done. Over time we will redo all the trim, paint, flooring, light fixtures etc. Those projects will be done as time and budget permits.

    I have no illusions that it will all be rainbows and lollipops. I fully anticipate working my butt off! It will be hard, smelly, and frustrating for a long time.

    Are you still there? Lol, sorry that was so long. Once I got started I just couldn’t stop!

    P.S. Yes, I have considered turning the whole barn into my she shed!
    Melissa

    I really hate it when the voices in my head argue among themselves as though I wasn't even in the room.

    I tried to be normal once......worst two minutes of my life.

  6. Thanks auntstuff, Claire Hallman, Star lover thanked for this post
  7. #16
    Applique Angel

    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    You’ve clearly thought long and hard about this and as I have no practical advice to offer, I’ll wish you and your family well in your new venture. Please can we see some me before and after pictures?

  8. #17
    The Guild President

    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    580
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    Regarding the wood stove in the living room....

    When I bought my house 25 years ago, it had a very nice Vermont Castings wood stove in the family room. Hardly ever used it. Last summer, my insurance agent was out to do a review of our coverage. He spotted the wood stove and wanted to get a picture of the UL rating. Turns out the stove didn't have a UL rating, as it wasn't a thing in the mid-80's when the stove was installed. But the insurance company now requires it, and my stove was not grandfathered in. In order to insure the property, I had to remove (or at the very least, disable) the wood stove. And it isn't just State Farm that wouldn't insure it; it's every insurance company.

    So my advice to is to make sure the wood stove is up to code and blessed by your insurer before purchasing this property.

    And my hat is off to you for taking on such a challenge!

  9. #18
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    6,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    Oh yes, that pesky insurance thing. We are not in an insurance zone so no one wants to insure our house. USAA agreed to do it with a 225% risk charge (in other words, 225% MORE than if we were in the zone. But, we need insurance. Also, of course, the pool might be an insurance thing. Ours isn't since we have no neighbors, but yours might.
    Before you sign the contract make sure the county doesn't have restrictions on making your property a multifamily dwelling.

    Now, back to you....mid 40's makes a huge difference. So, it seems like you are bound and determined...DH still working so money isn't the issue and health seems good. Children living on the land will help and it will be an awesome experience for all of you.

  10. #19
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Hoschton, Georgia
    Posts
    1,178
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Mini farm

    With everything that's been said< I can only add this...You have my utmost admiration for wanting to go thus with this endeavor. I agree with Melissa a really nice she shed has my vote. Good luck & you know we want pictures.

    Gina

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •