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  1. #21
    The Guild President

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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    My parents were afraid of snakes & I got several spankings as a child for bringing a snake into the house, playing with it for a while, putting it down on the floor & walking away. I'll never forgot the day my mom opened the drawer under the stove to get a cake pan & a snake was curled up in the pan. She screamed, spanked me & then dad spanked me when he got home from work.
    Give me a snake over a mouse or rat any day of the week.




  2. Thanks lourixe, auntstuff thanked for this post
  3. #22
    The Guild President

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    Jan 2017
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    MN
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    When I moved into this house 25 years ago, a friend who was helping me move brought me to the basement and pointed out the garter snake that was curled up next to the furnace. We relocated the snake to the woods behind the house. A couple of days later, I found another snake near the furnace. He (or she) was also flung out into the woods. The next day, I walked into the kitchen, flipped on the light, and saw a snake slithering across the kitchen floor. I lost it and started screaming, "How in the h*** are you getting into my house?" It was all for naught, though. Snakes will not break their code of silence.

    I called several pest control companies until I finally found one that would even deal with snakes. The technician came out to my house and advised me that the snakes were crawling up the foundation and were slithering behind the siding. He advised me to caulk the juncture where the siding meets the concrete block foundation. And so, caulk I did. I spent the next two days lying on my back on crushed rock, poking my caulk gun up behind the siding and sealing it up. Things were great for a few days until I found yet another snake in the family room. I called the pest control company and talked to the owner, who was a wildlife biologist. He told me that because it was autumn, the snakes were looking for a warm place. They had already crawled into the house, and were now nesting in the concrete block walls. He said that caulking was the worst thing I could have done, because I had now trapped them in my house. And the cherry on the cake was that before hibernating in my foundation, they had already bred, and baby snakes would arrive in the spring.

    Understandably, I was not pleased to hear this. I protested that I had applied the caulk because that's what his technician recommended. The owner maintained that he was not responsible for the advice his technician dispensed. I begged to differ. "He drives your truck, wears your uniform, and represents your company. I hired your company to advise me on how to deal with this problem. And now you're telling me that you are not responsible for that advice?" If memory serves, the phrases "Better Business Bureau" and "Attorney General's Office" may have passed my lips. There was a long pause, and then he agreed to a compromise. In the spring, his company would come out and remove the caulk. Once all the snakes had moved out for the summer, his company would return and re-apply the caulk. In the meantime, an occasional snake may come out of hibernation, and I would have to deal with it.

    I had a lonely winter, as most of my friends were too creeped out to visit. I got saddled with the nickname "Medusa." And yes, I had to deal with sticky board traps and disposing of an occasional snake. Actually, even after the unplugging and re-plugging, I continued to have snakes in the house occasionally until I discovered they were entering under the concrete front steps. When I replaced the steps, I had the contractor plug the hole under the steps. Haven't had a problem since. It did take me a few years, though, before I lost the uneasiness about walking barefoot in the house.

    Sorry if this story traumatized anyone.

  4. Thanks Claire Hallman thanked for this post
  5. #23
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Effingham, IL
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    1,746
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    OMG!! My house would have been for sale after the first snake! A friend found a snake in her basement storage room and now I won't go in ours without kicking the door and making lots of noise before entering. Hubby has been warned, if a snake is found in our house it will be on the market.

    Quote Originally Posted by MSN View Post
    When I moved into this house 25 years ago, a friend who was helping me move brought me to the basement and pointed out the garter snake that was curled up next to the furnace. We relocated the snake to the woods behind the house. A couple of days later, I found another snake near the furnace. He (or she) was also flung out into the woods. The next day, I walked into the kitchen, flipped on the light, and saw a snake slithering across the kitchen floor. I lost it and started screaming, "How in the h*** are you getting into my house?" It was all for naught, though. Snakes will not break their code of silence.

    I called several pest control companies until I finally found one that would even deal with snakes. The technician came out to my house and advised me that the snakes were crawling up the foundation and were slithering behind the siding. He advised me to caulk the juncture where the siding meets the concrete block foundation. And so, caulk I did. I spent the next two days lying on my back on crushed rock, poking my caulk gun up behind the siding and sealing it up. Things were great for a few days until I found yet another snake in the family room. I called the pest control company and talked to the owner, who was a wildlife biologist. He told me that because it was autumn, the snakes were looking for a warm place. They had already crawled into the house, and were now nesting in the concrete block walls. He said that caulking was the worst thing I could have done, because I had now trapped them in my house. And the cherry on the cake was that before hibernating in my foundation, they had already bred, and baby snakes would arrive in the spring.

    Understandably, I was not pleased to hear this. I protested that I had applied the caulk because that's what his technician recommended. The owner maintained that he was not responsible for the advice his technician dispensed. I begged to differ. "He drives your truck, wears your uniform, and represents your company. I hired your company to advise me on how to deal with this problem. And now you're telling me that you are not responsible for that advice?" If memory serves, the phrases "Better Business Bureau" and "Attorney General's Office" may have passed my lips. There was a long pause, and then he agreed to a compromise. In the spring, his company would come out and remove the caulk. Once all the snakes had moved out for the summer, his company would return and re-apply the caulk. In the meantime, an occasional snake may come out of hibernation, and I would have to deal with it.

    I had a lonely winter, as most of my friends were too creeped out to visit. I got saddled with the nickname "Medusa." And yes, I had to deal with sticky board traps and disposing of an occasional snake. Actually, even after the unplugging and re-plugging, I continued to have snakes in the house occasionally until I discovered they were entering under the concrete front steps. When I replaced the steps, I had the contractor plug the hole under the steps. Haven't had a problem since. It did take me a few years, though, before I lost the uneasiness about walking barefoot in the house.

    Sorry if this story traumatized anyone.
    Robin
    My Pinterest Page of the Quilts I've Made: http://www.pinterest.com/rwmomto3/quilts-ive-made/

  6. #24
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Fredericksburg VA
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    We have copperheads. 2 dogs- 3 copperhead snakes bites later...rather have black snakes. We have those too, they just don’t mess with the dogs.

  7. #25
    Missouri Star

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    Apr 2014
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    Alabama
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    I just don't get it , maybe I am missing something. People who have snakes as pets. I don't see what joy a snake could bring you. I have heard of people keeping frozen mice in the freezer to feed them. ( that is just gross ) Get a dog or a cat or heck a pot belly pig if you want something different. Something you can love on and will love you in return.

  8. #26
    Block Queen

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    Feb 2017
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    I am the person in the neighborhood people call when they see a snake in their yard. I have spent several hours cutting out a black snake from a mesh fence. Snakes are creepy. It is just that I do not like mice more. So far garter, corn, and black snakes are around, but copperheads are known to be nearby.
    One year, there was a battle between a snake and our outdoor fish. Eventually the fish won but not before 20 or more fish became fast food for the snake.

  9. #27
    Missouri Star

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    Jan 2015
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    Hoschton, Georgia
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    OMG!!!!!!! NOT GROSS!!!!!!!!!!!!!! SNAKE WARNING!!!! DON"T LIKE THEM!! SCARES THE BEJEEBERS OUT OF ME!!!!!!!!!

    JMHO!!
    NO LOL HERE!!!

    Gina

  10. #28
    Missouri Star

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    Apr 2013
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    A few years ago we thought we had a mouse in the house. DH set a mouse trap. While watching TV we heard the mouse trap snap. DH went to the trap and said to me "You have got to see this!" In the mouse trap was a small snake. It was about a foot long and was as thick as two pencils together. It was not a poisonous one. After living in Florida for 4 years, I'm not much freaked out by the critters that can get in the house. When we lived overseas, we discovered a scorpion on the wall. That did freak me out some.
    Vonnie

  11. #29
    4 Patch Pro

    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Canada
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    Ewww. I really hate snakes, I think if see one I will immediately run. I feel like it will bite or attack me.

  12. #30
    The Guild President

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    Mar 2017
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    Default Re: This Is Gross...BEWARE...

    C'mon now. You have to finish the story. Tell us how you got creative. My mom trapped a mouse in a tall box she had turned on its side and then sat it up. She had a broom in the box for what reason I don't know, but she stirred around and around until they both were exhausted. She gave up and took the box outside a ways and let it go.

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