Hi Guest, Welcome to the quilting forums, register now —or—

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31
  1. #1
    Fabric Fanatic

    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I am opening the door to machine quilting and have several ??s.

    1. Never heard of spray basting until yesterday. Finding the pins are always in the way so it makes sense. Please tell me if spray basting is possible without making a mess all over-seems like high potential. Plus how bad does it smell?-I do have allergies and worry it may create issues. Please share + and - experiences

    2. I am trying to practice quilting with walking foot daily and am getting tired of swapping feet every day. Is it OK to piece using the walking foot to avoid the issue. If not, why not?

    Thanks all and happy jelly roll day! Katie

  2. #2
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Southern CA
    Posts
    1,139
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    By no means do I have years of experience but this is what I have found...

    Spray Basting... I can't handle the odor of the more economical and most preferred ones (I think 505 is one of them). I use the Sulky brand, and it is not cheap, but practically odorless. But it is a temporary baste, so don't sandwich the quilt until you are actually ready to start quilting. I still pin baste on smaller projects that need quilting.

    https://www.amazon.com/Sulky-4-23-Ou...ds=sulky+spray

    2. Walking foot.... There are days I wish my machine had one of those built in walking feet thingys, but alas I don't, so change and change and change again I find myself doing. I have left it on after quilting to sew my binding strips together and while it works, it is not something I would do on regular basis. Seems the two layers of fabric are just not quite thick enough for smooth sewing, not sure this makes sense. And I am one that has to forever be reminding myself, walking foot is for walking, slow down. When doing regular sewing I do tend to put the pedal to the metal and away we goooooooooooooooo. Thank goodness for that speed control on the machine.

  3. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post
  4. #3
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    4,957
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    Before I got my longarm I spray basted. I used the floor and would smooth the backing fabric out, then center the batting on top. Then gently fold down the batting half way and spray baste the batting (lightly) then gently lay it back on top of the backing. Then I would repeat this with the other half. Then center the top on the batting. Turn down the top half way and spray baste the batting, then gently lay the top back down and smooth it. Repeat for the other half. Then take an iron and press, not iron, the three layers while still on the floor. Helps set the basting spray. Then I would put the curved safety pins around the edges so if it catches on something it won't separate the layers.

    The reason I spray basted the batting instead of the backing or pieced top is if I got a little too heavy handed with the spray it would saturate the fabric. Yuck.

    I would also do stitch in the ditch on all major seams to help anchor the three layers together. The larger the quilt, the more you have to scrunch it up getting it through the throat of your machine.
    Vonnie

  5. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post
  6. #4
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    8,740
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    Walking foot - I really don't object to switching back & forth, but I do try to plan ahead. Before I put on the walking foot, I sew together my binding strips & have them wrapped around the cardboard tube ready to use. I never use the walking foot & size 90 quilting needle for regular stitching, except for when I sew together the 2 ends of the binding. I do, however, use it for hemming flannel blankets & making flannel burp cloths.

    Basting spray - I have never used it. I'm sensitive to odors, plus I cannot do the spraying indoors. We have a gas furnace, so I'm always careful what I use in the basement. I prefer to use the curved basting pins. It isn't really a problem to remove them as you quilt.

  7. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post
  8. #5
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    6,487
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I use spray basting. I have a very small field of vision and I'm afraid one of those pins will slip up on me. Back in NC I had a large living room floor. I had 2- 2'' pvc pipes I'd wrap my batting and top on. I'd spread out the backing on the floor then put the pipe with the batting- spray lightly about 12" then roll the batting on that, then start the quilt top. I'd lightly spray about 12" then press and move on. It worked well, but big quilts are getting too hard to manhandle for me. The last 2 big queens I had done at the LQS.

    As far as changing needles. I do change with each new project.
    Katrina


    “Nothing can dim the light which shines from within.”
    ― Maya Angelou

  9. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post
  10. #6
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    10,173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I do not use spray basting. I don't like the smell or expensive, pins are buy once have forever. Plus over spray issues and 3 kitties in the house.
    Walking foot I have no experience as I have a Pfaff with IDT. Best thing ever and works with almost every foot.
    Iris Girl = April = fabric, Fabric FABRIC!!
    Time spent with cats is never wasted.
    Sigmund Freud

  11. #7
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Pelham, Alabama
    Posts
    4,815
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I rarely use spray basting, I don't care for the mess and no matter how careful I am it is messy. The smell doesn't bother me though.
    I am probably odd but I like pin basting, I find it relaxing and don't pin too close together that it bothers me to remove the pins as I quilt. Needles are fairly cheap so I try to change them often.

  12. #8
    Applique Angel

    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St Joseph, Missouri - about 50 min from M*.
    Posts
    323
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I don't use spray basting, as I don't like chemicals - especially flammable chemicals - on my quilt; really don't like the overspray issues.

    I tried pin basting and hated running into them - plus my hands got sore trying to close all those pins. So, I found Sharon Schamber's method (it is on YouTube - just search for her channel or for board basting and pick hers) which uses boards (no more crawling around the floor even for a king sized quilt) and white cotton tatting thread. Basically, I am thread basting it about every 3-4 inches apart (think herringbone stitch). I really like this because the quilt won't shift, I don't get puckers and if my FMQ or stitch in the ditch, cross over the basting thread, the tatting thread is easy to remove. Just clip tatting thread close to your quilt line and tug tatting thread end gently; it will untwist and pull free of the quilting line.

    But you do have to use a cotton tatting thread (I order DMC from Amazon) because it doesn't slide around in the quilt sandwich, so it really holds the quilt together beautifully while I bunch and tug and pull it into position in my DSM while quilting.

  13. Thanks Katiebloom, quiltingaway, SallyO'Sews thanked for this post
  14. #9
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    5,182
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I use spray basting for smaller projects or when I'm in a hurry, and the board basting Julie A mentioned for larger things. Last time I made a set of placemats, I spray-basted the backing to the batting before cutting, then sprayed the batting and placed the pieced fronts on top; then cut the batting & backs around the tops (not sure this makes any sense whatsoever... ). Worked for me. I don't use very much at a time, and since I spread the work out on my dining room table for either method, I cover it with large plastic garbage bags before I begin, so I don't wreck the table with any "overspray."

    I would get one can and see how you like it; then do the pin or hand-basting, and see what you prefer. You're probably going to me making LOTS of quilts, right? So experiment and do what suits you! Have fun, and don't forget to post pics!

  15. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post
  16. #10
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    4,347
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I've been fmq for almost 2 years now, so far less experience than many here. I have been using the Odif 505 spray which has worked better for me than some of the others like June Tailor. The thing to remember is this: spray sparingly! You are not lacquering your hair against a gale! Also, there will always be overspray, so protect your surrounding surfaces! I have a canvas painter's tarp I use around the floor. I also follow Sharon Schamber's method and I like it. It works for my small spaces. BIG BUT. The fumes. I have somewhat compromised lungs and this stuff just isn't good for you. I wear a mask, open the windows and use a strong fan on a stand, so it is right at table level. I use a 3M N95 mask. Interesting to see Mimi Howard's endorsement of the Sulky brand spray. I had never heard of it and looked it up. No CFCs, not toxic, but the manufacturer says it disappears in a few days. So a tradeoff there. It's more expensive, but the manufacturer says there is more in the can and you spray at a 6" distance because of low propellant strength. That sounds like an advantage to me. I used to be impatient with having to change feet, but now I consider it a feature of my machines to be able to use the right foot for the application. It's attitude adjustment. I like to sew faster, so a walking foot would not suit me at all other than straight line quilting where I want to use the guide. My machine can handle anything, so I am spoiled about that I guess and almost never use it. Needles. Change them. Frequently. But only if you want nice stitches, lol.

  17. Thanks Katiebloom thanked for this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •