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  1. #1
    Beginning Stitcher

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    Mar 2016
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    Default changing quilt sizes ..

    Hi ..... I would love to make so many of the quilts that I have found on this amazing sight but feel I am only able
    to manage doing small quilts for now, baby size and maybe a bit bigger. Is there somewhere I can find that measurements and amounts of fabrics to do this for each quilt pattern.

    I would love to do all the hexi quilts but in a baby size and single size quilts.

    thanks Abbie.

  2. #2
    Missouri Star

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    Mar 2013
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    Abbie....

    I know I'm not a MSQC employee, but here's a suggestion. Some of the Block bookazines have the size differences and amounts of fabrics.
    Now, that being said; once you decide how big you want your project to be, knowledge of your block size and borders can be figured for desgin layout and fabric amounts. Do the math!

    Here is also a guideline on pre-cuts and how big of a project you can make. This will give you a rough estimate......

    I have this precut, what can it make?
    August 28, 2013

    All of the sizes given below do not include borders, simply what each precut can make. By adding borders you can make your quilt bigger. Also depending on the pattern used, the end size can change, but that’s when borders come in handy, in my experience.

    The standard charm pack has 42 pieces of 5 inch fabric.
    1 – Baby quilt

    2 – Crib size quilt

    3 – Lap quilt

    5 – Twin quilt

    8 – Queen quilt


    A standard layer cake has 42 pieces of 10 inch fabric.

    1 – Twin quilt

    2 – Queen quilt

    A jelly roll has 40 pieces of 2.5 inch strips of fabric.

    1 – Lap/Twin quilt

    2 – Queen quilt


    A quilt made from a fat quarter bundle all depends on the size of the bundle. One bundle can make anything from a full size quilt to a king size quilt. A fat quarter bundle is 18 x 22″ cut of fabric which equals a quarter yard.

    I’m also including the finished sizes of quilts or bedspreads. Each size should be taken with grain of salt:

    Baby = 36′” x 54″

    Crib = 45″ x 60″

    Twin = 63″ x 87″

    Double = 78″ x 87″

    Queen= 84″ x 92″

    King = 100″ x 92″
    Sherri

    "Don't let someone else's ugly spoil your beautiful. " Thanks, Bubby!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Missouri, but not close enough to MSQC!
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    Abbie, Sherri has given you some great information about quilt sizes in general. Taking this information, you can indeed figure out your own requirement as far as yardage for the size quilt you want to make.

    This is somewhat of a rant on my part, we want to be helpful, but figuring out yardage changes for people isn't easy ( well for some it is). It sounds like it can be done in a minute or two, but it really is sort of a big job to do it correctly. But I will try to be helpful instead of crabby, and hope this helps to answer your questions.

    I think developing these math skills are a very vital part of building your quilting skills. I'm not that great at math, it has always been my weakest subject! I have advanced college degrees yet never took college algebra! But I can figure out how much fabric to purchase by using a very basic tool, a calculator and a pencil and paper.

    Think of your piece of fabric as a grid of 1" squares. If you need 20 5" squares, how will you get that out of your fabric? Let's see, the fabric is probably 42" across the width, so I can cut 8 5" squares out of a piece of fabric 5" long by WOF. To get my 20 squares, I'd have to use 15" of fabric and I could actually cut 24 squares out of that. 15" is close to 1/2 yard, so that is how much I want to buy. Figure your fabric requirements based on thinking how many inches it takes to cut the required pieces from 42" fabric.

    Another great help is to make sample blocks using scrap fabrics and the directions for single blocks from your pattern. I like to use those cheap fat quarters you get for .99 that are wierd colors or scratchy fabric (that I wish I hadn't bought) to make my sample blocks. Once the block is made you can use it to measure how big it is to figure out how many you are going to need to make to make the size quilt you want to make. I keep all my sample blocks clipped together on a big safety pin for future reference.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    notes attached to help me remember what size fabric I started with

    Another thing you need to think of is the layout of your quilt. You usually want more rows from top to bottom that blocks across. That's why the number 42 in charm packs and layer cakes is such a great number. You can build your block array by putting 6 blocks across and 7 rows down. I sort of cringe when people make quilts really long and skinny, that isn't a very practical size. Square quilts can be tricky also, although they are very beautiful on a bed or as a wall hanging.

    It takes a lot of time to figure out fabric requirements for all sizes of quilts and the thousands of patterns available. I worked for a while figuring out changes in yardage for some of Jenny's tutorials. I used all these methods I described above and it took a long time to figure each request out accurately. Some of our members are so fast at figuring out changes, but your best bet for your own quilts is to develop the skill to figure it out on your own. And if you make a little error, err on the side of getting just a little more than you might need. Saves some frantic eBay shopping looking for a retired fabric when you just need 1/4 yard more!

    Hope this wasn't't too crabby, and you find it helpful!

  4. #4
    Prairie Pointer

    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Leavenworth, Ks
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    I'm not sure what size you are starting from but you can always use the same pattern and make smaller blocks (use 5 inch squares instead of 10) OR you can take a few rows and columns away to suit your need.

  5. #5
    Applique Angel

    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    306
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    I think the easiest way to make a quilt smaller from a tutorial is to just make fewer blocks. Many of the tutorials have six blocks in a row and seven rows in the quilt. That's 42 blocks total. If you want it smaller, start with half the blocks. Lay them out four in a row with five rows (20 blocks total). The result will be about half the size of the tutorial quilt.

  6. #6
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Oregon
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    1,517
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    When I need to reduce or increase the size of a quilt I add or subtract the number of blocks I make. What REALLY helps in calculating the yardage needed is an app I have on my phone, Robert Kaufman Quilt Calc. It will tell you how many yards of fabric you need for each piece in a block,,, it's really easy & accurate & best of all its a free app..
    May the road rise up to meet you...
    May the wind be always at your back...
    May you be in Heaven a half hour before the Devil knows you're dead...
    Patt

  7. #7
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Kauai
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    21,814
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    I'm sort of on the side where I wish they would do some more baby and kids quilts. I'm never going to make a queen or king. There could be a break down in sizes a little more.



    Lorie

  8. #8
    Missouri Star

    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Orlando
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    I like making any size quilt but I would like to see Jenny with more tutorials for babies. I do nt worry to much about over ordering. I can use the stash or give to my granddaughter who is still a newbie and of course has no budget yet for her own stash building.
    Karen
    Life is short - live it up while you can

  9. #9
    Missouri Star

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    VT (formerly Arkansas & Missouri)
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    Default Re: changing quilt sizes ..

    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Sewing Machine View Post
    Abbie, Sherri has given you some great information about quilt sizes in general. Taking this information, you can indeed figure out your own requirement as far as yardage for the size quilt you want to make.

    This is somewhat of a rant on my part, we want to be helpful, but figuring out yardage changes for people isn't easy ( well for some it is). It sounds like it can be done in a minute or two, but it really is sort of a big job to do it correctly. But I will try to be helpful instead of crabby, and hope this helps to answer your questions.

    I think developing these math skills are a very vital part of building your quilting skills. I'm not that great at math, it has always been my weakest subject! I have advanced college degrees yet never took college algebra! But I can figure out how much fabric to purchase by using a very basic tool, a calculator and a pencil and paper.

    Think of your piece of fabric as a grid of 1" squares. If you need 20 5" squares, how will you get that out of your fabric? Let's see, the fabric is probably 42" across the width, so I can cut 8 5" squares out of a piece of fabric 5" long by WOF. To get my 20 squares, I'd have to use 15" of fabric and I could actually cut 24 squares out of that. 15" is close to 1/2 yard, so that is how much I want to buy. Figure your fabric requirements based on thinking how many inches it takes to cut the required pieces from 42" fabric.

    Another great help is to make sample blocks using scrap fabrics and the directions for single blocks from your pattern. I like to use those cheap fat quarters you get for .99 that are wierd colors or scratchy fabric (that I wish I hadn't bought) to make my sample blocks. Once the block is made you can use it to measure how big it is to figure out how many you are going to need to make to make the size quilt you want to make. I keep all my sample blocks clipped together on a big safety pin for future reference.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	203.4 KB 
ID:	128726
    notes attached to help me remember what size fabric I started with

    Another thing you need to think of is the layout of your quilt. You usually want more rows from top to bottom that blocks across. That's why the number 42 in charm packs and layer cakes is such a great number. You can build your block array by putting 6 blocks across and 7 rows down. I sort of cringe when people make quilts really long and skinny, that isn't a very practical size. Square quilts can be tricky also, although they are very beautiful on a bed or as a wall hanging.

    It takes a lot of time to figure out fabric requirements for all sizes of quilts and the thousands of patterns available. I worked for a while figuring out changes in yardage for some of Jenny's tutorials. I used all these methods I described above and it took a long time to figure each request out accurately. Some of our members are so fast at figuring out changes, but your best bet for your own quilts is to develop the skill to figure it out on your own. And if you make a little error, err on the side of getting just a little more than you might need. Saves some frantic eBay shopping looking for a retired fabric when you just need 1/4 yard more!

    Hope this wasn't't too crabby, and you find it helpful!
    Beautifully stated, Jean!
    Sherri

    "Don't let someone else's ugly spoil your beautiful. " Thanks, Bubby!!!!!!

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