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Thread: Steamfast iron

  1. #1
    Missouri Star

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    Default Steamfast iron

    Finally got curious and bought one of these little things.
    Amazon.com - SteamFast SF-717 Home-and-Away Mini Steam Iron - Travel Irons

    I've seen people say they press fabric together for piecing and other tricks like that, but never felt like getting up and down 50 million times to get to the ironing board. I bought a small extension ironing table that fits right by the SewEzi (would fit on, but a 2 cube stand works better) I can put a cutting mat on the ironing table, too. You can get your legs right under it.

    I have the Clover mini irons and a sealing iron - both purchased for quilting in the hoop. You need an iron with a handle to make that easier. However, even with spritzing, they don't press well. The handle prevents quite a bit of pressure being applied to flatten a seam.

    This little iron does steam. You can grab it where you need to to press anything. It's got its drawbacks. I don't understand the fill - it comes with a small cup that has a line for "max" fill, but if you put all that water in, it leaks a bit like it's been overfilled. I just haven't found the sweet spot yet. It has a rather long cord. It is nice for piecing. It's also small enough that you have to press rather than iron. That's also a big help.

    This would be the spot for a mini cordless with a sprayer or steam.

    I've been meaning to work on quilting technique for a while. Now have decided to make time, and anything that will break a bad habit or induce a new one can be a big help.

  2. #2
    Beginning Stitcher

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    Default Re: Steamfast iron

    I got one of these for Christmas. I did plug it in and play with it but haven't added water yet - thanks for the warning! I wanted this iron to use beside my sewing machine as I'm piecing. I covered a TV tray with batting and ironing board fabric. I think it will be handy to just press a seam open, not having to get up every time. I'm not fond of the little drawstring carrying bag...I think I'll find a plastic box to store it in.
    Daffy
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  3. #3
    The Guild President

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    Default Re: Steamfast iron

    I'd love to know how you like it. I have a similar one from Sunbeam, got it for under $5 on the end aisle clearance at Target more than ten years ago. But I've always hated the divets in the sole plate, it leaves an impression in my fabric. Still, it's very handy and has never broken. I use it with my Fons and Porter pressing mat right on my desktop ($8 on sale from Amazon, can make your own from canvas and InsulBrite), I can't often get up and down to iron and mostly don't iron a whole lot at once so it works out great. I've sometimes used my Panasonic cordless, but with my small temporary space it's a bit much to put on my desktop even though it's not a bad size for small pressing.

    Do you know how long the cord is? Maybe I missed it in the product description. That's another gripe about mine, I'd like another few inches of cord. It's not too short really, I'd just like more slack so I can put it down further back on my desk.

  4. #4
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Steamfast iron

    Think the cord is at least 4ft. I have the power strip under the table where I can reach it, and the iron sits on the modular cube I have between the SewEzi and a Horn cabinet. It's long enough for me to catch my feet in it.

    I didn't see the length of the cord on the box, but it is well over 3 ft. Could even be a 5 footer.

    It comes with a travel case, and you can switch voltage if you travel with it. The steam vents are all on the front of the iron.

    If it does leave small impressions, a big iron should take care of those when you do the final press on the piece.

    I'm fussy about irons. I worked in a dry cleaners as a kid, and learned to use the equipment. A lot of irons just don't cut it. I liked having both top and bottom steam.

    So far, I am liking it. If you knock it over you have a few seconds to deal with it. The Clover and Sealing irons sit on stands and can be knocked over easily. This thing sits up like a regular iron, so you tend to pay more attention and regard it as a regular iron. It will leak, but it dries right up if you iron over the drips. My table is covered with that silvery fabric. The fill cup is small enough to be kept out of the way since you don't use it as often as a spritzer.

    If anything is laying on a table, it's fair game for the Siamese cat. Yesterday she got the large seam ripper and a USB drive.

    The wattage is low enough to use a timer. Most of the timers are the hourly type that go on every day at a set hour. There are timers that will only turn on for a set time, turn off, and stay off until you turn the timer on again. Found one of those on Amazon and like it. I can set it for up to 3 hours which means if the other half wants help with a project, I don't have to run in and turn the iron off. When he wants help, he wants it NOW and you don't leave until he's done.

    I had a really good hourly timer years ago, but it was rated for 1600 watts, and the steam generator Rowenta was 1800..

    If you do ever use a timer, make sure it's a countdown. The other half put an hourly timer on the Clover iron and it almost caught the storage cube on fire. He'd forgotten that it would turn itself back on.
    Last edited by Alpha O; December 30th, 2015 at 11:09 AM.

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