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  1. #1
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    Default Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    I finished my first ever quilt top. Finally got my backing and batting. Hubby bought me a walking foot. Health issues and fear of not being able to do it sidelined me for a bit. Saturday I cleaned the living room floor...the only place I have to work that is big enough...and laid out the backing and smoothed it out. But as soon as I put that batting on it, it wrinkled up in a dozen places. Every time I got one spot smooth, two more wrinkles popped up. I tugged on it so much I actually stretched one place on one side. How in the world do you get the batting laid down smoothly on the backing without wrinkling up the batting. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    Is it by any chance a packaged batting? I always have better luck buying batting by the yard. It is much smoother than the packaged kind.

  3. #3
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    What kind of batting do you have? I use warm and natural and have never had that problem...but then again I haven't made very many quilts. I'm sure someone can help.

  4. #4
    The Guild President

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    I tape it to the floor with making tape. First I tape the backing down smooth. Then the batting, then the top. I tape as little of the edges as possible, just enough to hold it down. Then I pin the whole quilt. I do sometimes get the carpet with the pins. ☺

    I have recently read about design walls and spray basting. I'm sure someone will suggest that. I would like to try that because it seems easier on my knees.
    One yard of fabric, like one cookie, is never enough!

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  6. #5
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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingaway View Post
    Is it by any chance a packaged batting? I always have better luck buying batting by the yard. It is much smoother than the packaged kind.
    I bought it by the yard.

  7. #6
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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    Quote Originally Posted by Lori63 View Post
    What kind of batting do you have? I use warm and natural and have never had that problem...but then again I haven't made very many quilts. I'm sure someone can help.
    It is Warm and Natural. It isn't the batting itself that is wrinkled. I just can't seem to get everything smoothed out. When I try to fix one area, another area sort of bunches up. Maybe wrinkle was the wrong terminology.

  8. #7
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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    Quote Originally Posted by CraftHer View Post
    I tape it to the floor with making tape. First I tape the backing down smooth. Then the batting, then the top. I tape as little of the edges as possible, just enough to hold it down. Then I pin the whole quilt. I do sometimes get the carpet with the pins. ☺

    I have recently read about design walls and spray basting. I'm sure someone will suggest that. I would like to try that because it seems easier on my knees.
    Thank you. That makes sense. I will try that! A design wall and spray basting is out of the question due to room and breathing problems.

  9. #8
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    You need to clamp or fix the backing fabric down before you add the batting layer (with pins or tape or clamps) Here is my favorite you tube video on how to baste a large quilt sandwich in sections on a small table. It sure is easier on your knees and back than working on the floor.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnke_KzeTI8
    Stash Treasure Acquisitions Beyond Life Expectancy. My stash keeps me STABLE, oh yeah.... and dark chocolate.

  10. #9
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    Do you have a cutting table (even a kitchen table will do)? there is a method using spring clamps where you start in the center, pin, then readjust, clamp, and pin some more. I had great success using this method on a queen sized quilt (my cutting table is 5' X 3'). I just can't crawl around on the floor - my knees don't like it! I'm looking for the video that I used, I'll post it in a minute when I find it...
    found it.. it's pretty funny to watch even if you don't use this method
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iw4sibuP8n4
    Last edited by songbird857; July 26th, 2015 at 10:57 PM.

  11. #10
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Excitement has turned to tears of frustration

    I know that can be frustrating. It is my least favorite part of making a quilt. First thing I do after cutting the backing to the size I want is to press it to get as many wrinkles out as possible. I lay my batting down first and lay it out completely flat. I then place my backing over it. The method that works best for me is to use heavy weights across the middle of the backing at this point. I work with one half of the backing at a time. I then raise the backing over the top of the weights, out of the way of the spraying area. (I have some antique flat irons that weigh a lot that I use for this); I spray 505 Basting Spray. Then I carefully pull the backing over the sprayed area, slowly smoothing from the middle out until I get to the outside edges. You can pull it up and replace any problem areas. I wait about 15 minutes and move the weights to the top of the sprayed area; lift the other half up and over the weights and repeat the process, again. I wait another 15 minutes and carefully turn the whole thing over and use the same technique for the top as I did for the backing. I then place pins to help it not move more than necessary .

    When I am working on a large quilt my husband sometimes helps me. I hope you can understand my explanation. Others may have more effective ways of sandwiching a quilt and hopefully they will give you ideas, too, but this method seems to work fine for me.

    Don't give up. Once you get a technique down you will start to feel better about the process.

    Good luck.
    Gerri

    Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we are here we might as well dance.

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