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  1. #1
    Fabric Fanatic

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    Default Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    I've used steam-a-seam for years for zipper insertions so on my last utility quilt, I decided to give it a try. It worked great! I used the temporary version which washes out. This is SO much better than using pins or clips to hold the binding in place before sewing. I put how-to and pictures on my blog. The Presser Foot Blog

  2. #2
    The Guild President

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    I use glue but this idea looks just as easy and effective - same basic idea. As I have some steam-a-seam light, I might give this a try with my next binding to see if I like it better than glue.
    Debbie

  3. #3
    Designer Diva

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Thanks for how-to. I am getting ready to bind 2 quilts this weekend and this looks like the ideal thing to try.

    I have in the past, on some placemats, used Roxannes glue with an iron to set, and the bindings turned out great, but was very time consuming.

    I have always put the binding on to the BACK of the quilt first and then machine sewed from the front.
    Would this make a difference??

    Off the my LQS for some of this.

    And no, these quilts are not show calibre. They are the cuddle up, drop on the floor, eat popcorn on type of quilts.
    Sometimes I wake up Grumpy!
    Other times I just let HIM sleep.

    Lynn

  4. #4
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Super tutorial and really neat idea!!!!!
    Happy Quilting!

  5. Thanks BeckyLeeSews thanked for this post
  6. #5
    Fabric Fanatic

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Quote Originally Posted by Racing Nana View Post
    I have always put the binding on to the BACK of the quilt first and then machine sewed from the front.
    Would this make a difference??
    For machine binding, I too have always put it on the back first until I figured this method out. I had to visualize the front & back for how the finished quilt would look and I wanted the obvious sewn seam to only be seen on the back. The theory behind putting it on the back first was to for-sure catch the under side while sewing. If you use the SAS to "glue" the binding in place on the back at least 1/8" over the seam line, the theory is the same but the front of the quilt should be free of any stitches that missed the ditch. Hope that makes sense and good luck!

  7. #6
    The Guild President

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    Smile Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Great Tutorial Becky! I have been using Lite Steam-A-Seam2 for machine binding for almost 3 years and its the only way I do my bindings now. I started out using the 1/4" Lite Steam-A-Seam2 roll of fusible tape which works great for the standard 1/4" binding seam. I now prefer wider bindings though, so use the 1/2" fusible tape roll and end up with 5/8" finished bindings.

    You are absolutely correct that it is so much easier using this process instead of pins and clips to hold the binding together while sewing. Because the Steam-A-Seam is adjustable before it is permanently pressed you can really get things lined up properly and make sure the back binding is just barely covering your stitching seam. I may have to try your temporary Steam-A-Seam because once the binding is stitched you really don't need the permanent fusible.

    I was fortunate to have bought up several rolls of the Steam-A-Seam fusible a few years back before they went offline to revamp their product. I haven't tried the new version yet but hear it is very good also. I usually use my walking foot when stitching the binding, but I also have a blind stitch foot like you mention in your blog. I may have to give that a try also. Thanks!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Linda
    -its not the number of breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away!


  8. Thanks BeckyLeeSews thanked for this post
  9. #7
    Designer Diva

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Well now.......guess what was hiding in one of my sewing drawers????

    A full package ( 1/4" X 40 yrds) of SAS2.

    So what else should I have to go to my LQS for since this is off the shopping list?

    Any ideas????? lol
    Sometimes I wake up Grumpy!
    Other times I just let HIM sleep.

    Lynn

  10. #8
    Missouri Star

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Quote Originally Posted by Sewbee View Post
    Great Tutorial Becky! I have been using Lite Steam-A-Seam2 for machine binding for almost 3 years and its the only way I do my bindings now. I started out using the 1/4" Lite Steam-A-Seam2 roll of fusible tape which works great for the standard 1/4" binding seam. I now prefer wider bindings though, so use the 1/2" fusible tape roll and end up with 5/8" finished bindings.

    You are absolutely correct that it is so much easier using this process instead of pins and clips to hold the binding together while sewing. Because the Steam-A-Seam is adjustable before it is permanently pressed you can really get things lined up properly and make sure the back binding is just barely covering your stitching seam. I may have to try your temporary Steam-A-Seam because once the binding is stitched you really don't need the permanent fusible.

    I was fortunate to have bought up several rolls of the Steam-A-Seam fusible a few years back before they went offline to revamp their product. I haven't tried the new version yet but hear it is very good also. I usually use my walking foot when stitching the binding, but I also have a blind stitch foot like you mention in your blog. I may have to give that a try also. Thanks!

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	105484Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	105485Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	105486
    Linda! So glad to see you back on the forum ! I have the narrow Steam a Seam, I need to try it!

  11. #9
    The Guild President

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    Smile Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    For those planning to try the 1/4" SAS2 roll for binding I will give a small note of caution. Especially if the roll is an "older" one that is partially used and a little dried out. I have found that it is very easy for the 1/4" adhesive to come un-separated from its paper backing. This can be problematic if you pull out a very long strip from the roll. Trying to get the paper backing to stick again on that tiny 1/4" strip of fusible until it can be pressed into place can be frustrating.

    The best solution is to start out by trying a shorter length of the roll to see if the paper is firmly staying in place until you get the strip placed and pressed into position. Since I am still using 4-5 year old rolls I may be seeing this problem more often than you will see in a "fresh" roll. I also don't know if the brand new version of SAS2 which now uses a different paper may have eliminated that problem completely.

    I have not had this problem with the 1/2" SAS2 rolls. I think if it happens at all, it is more likely on the older 1/4" rolls.
    Just a FYI !


    P.S. Thanks Jean....I am sort of back. Still trying to find sewing time but hopeful it will come soon!
    Linda
    -its not the number of breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away!


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  13. #10
    Designer Diva

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    Default Re: Tutorial: Steam-a-Seam in a Machine Binding

    Linda, funny thing you should mention dried up rolls......what I found hiding in a drawer was just that.

    So I went to my LQS and bought fresh supply. (and just a few (haha) other things.

    Did one of the 2 quilts with this method and WOWSER worked great.
    The binding shifted in just a couple of spots and the stitching missed the binding on the back, but with a little extra stitching fixed it.

    It won['t take long to finish the second quilt today.

    Thank You Thank You BeckyLeeSews!
    Sometimes I wake up Grumpy!
    Other times I just let HIM sleep.

    Lynn

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