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Temperature/Weather quilt 2020

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    Getting Started

    Getting started with your temperature quilt

    Temperature quilts are fairly freeform in their design, so after doing some research, I decided to write up a How-To (despite not having made one yet myself, haha!) I will also post an example of how I'm doing my own quilt afterwards.

    First thing's first... decide roughly how big you want your quilt (or placemats) to be. There are 366 days in 2020 since it is a leap year, and months have 29, 30, or 31 days in them. Based on this information, you can then do some math and figure out how big/what shape your finished blocks need to be (remember to add your 0.5" to blocks for seams). You should figure out your basic layout if possible.

    Next, decide how complicated you want your blocks to be. You can record only highs, record highs and lows, or record highs+lows+weather if you want to get fancy. (Or some other combination if you are so inspired!)

    Then you need to decide on your color scheme. While the traditional temperature colors range from purple (lowest) to red (warmest), you do can use any color range you want. You will want to make a color map that assigns each temperature range a color.
    Before you make this map, you need to know what your average temperatures are where you live.

    Go to https://www.usclimatedata.com/ and select your state, then your city. For example, it looks like Hamilton, MO's highs range from about 35F to almost 90F in the summer, so if you were making a temperature quilt for Hamilton, you would focus on temperatures in that range and maybe have a single color to represent <35F and one for >90. Depending on how many colors of fabric you want to work with, you would break up your range into intervals and assign colors to each. If you are doing highs and lows, you need to cover both ranges, and there will be some overlap so you will need more of colors that correspond to temperatures which can be both highs and lows.

    If you are doing high/low in a single block, pick your block design. If you are doing weather, figure out all your block designs and how they correspond to the types of weather that occur where you live. Decide how you want to prioritize block designs if you have 2 or more weather phenomena in the same day.

    Decide if you want to make your quilt scrappy or if you want to stick with consistent fabric throughout. If it's the latter, you will want to make sure you have enough fabric on hand for temperatures that occur most frequently! Make sure to mark each fabric so you know which temps it represents - numbered pins are great for this, but you can always use baggies or pin paper numbers to your fabrics.

    #2
    Alright, so that felt like a lot of information, so I'm going to walk you through my design process for my temperature/weather quilt. Mine is a fairly complex version - I may be biting off more than I can chew.

    Size and layout: I am going to make my quilt approximately 93"x75". It's a large lap-quilt size, and if I decide it's too small I can always add borders or side strips. For layout, I'm a fan of modern quilting, so I am going to do each month as a column of 3" squares. I haven't decided if I'm going to put sashing in between the columns, or if I'm going to have a lot of negative space on either side of a central grouping of all 12 months, but I don't really need to decide that bit until I'm done with the whole year.

    I am going the complex route. I am going to record highs and lows, and use the block shape to indicate the most interesting weather phenomenon that happened locally.

    For my color scheme, I have a set of 32 fat quarters from the Chalk and Charcoal line that range from cool to warm. I still need to work out which color will represent which temperature, but there's a good chance I will go with the traditional purple/blue = cold and red/orange = warm scheme... but my collection includes neutrals, so I need to figure out where those go yet.

    I live in Denver, so I use https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/usco0105 as my climate data. I know that temperatures here can range from a little below 0 to a little above 100, but those are the extremes. The climate data says that most of my temps will fall in the 15F-90F range. Since I am doing highs and lows, I know I'm going to use a lot of fabrics where those ranges overlap. My 40F-60F colors will see a lot more use. Since I'm using a set of fat quarters for this, I've decided to make my temperature ranges a lot smaller between 40F-60F, so that I can see the temperature variation better, and so that I don't run out of those colors too quickly (though I still might!). I may wind up having to order some more of some of these fabrics. I'll put my temperature ranges in a separate reply below, so that you can see what I'm talking about.

    I'm trying to record weather as well as high/low, so I've designed a few blocks to represent the most common weather in my area: sun, rain, snow, high wind, blizzard, tornado, flash flood, hail, and fire/ash. See the photo gallery for my block designs/key. Dramatic weather events such as tornados, fires, and blizzards will take priority over fairly common events (for Denver) like sunshine. For phenomena that tend to occur together (flash flood/rain/tornado/hail), the severity of the event will dictate which one I choose.

    I'm going to try and stick to the same fabrics throughout. This may result in my making desperate fabric purchases off etsy, but I'm prepared.

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      #3
      My temperature ranges:
      (summer temps)
      >100F
      96F-100F
      91F-95F
      86F-90F
      81F-85F
      76F-80F
      71F-75F
      66F-70F
      (winter highs and summer lows start to overlap, so I've narrowed the ranges)
      64F-65F
      62F-63F
      60F-61F
      58F-59F
      56F-57F
      54F-55F
      52F-53F
      50F-51F
      48F-49F
      46F-47F
      44F-45F
      42F-43F
      40F-41F
      (winter temps below)
      35F-39F
      30F-34F
      25F-29F
      20F-24F
      15F-19F
      10F-14F
      5F-9F
      0F-4F
      <0F

      Comment


        #4
        Thank you for hosting this! I live in Texas so we don't get a huge range, so I want to think on how to best group colors or I'll have a red & orange quikt with just a few blues, lol

        I'm thinking of doing either HSTs or flying geese. I want to think on fabrics - part of me wants to do it in something like shot cotton, or maybe grunge....

        Comment


          #5
          Thank you for doing this. since the weather channel is the first thing that DH turn on in the morning, I'm all in. We live by the weather.

          I will have to figure my own scale as we use Celsius, and it can go from -40 to 35+. We also do weather with windchill and humidity, so I think I want to build this into the block. It will be colourful, that's for sure.

          Enjoy life and do what makes you happy. Everything else will follow.

          Every day I try to do one thing that challenges my comfort zone.

          Comment


            #6
            I have to figure my scale and colors, but i am maing the flying geese bllcks, that way I can do low and high temp in same block. Got idea from Pinterest
            Wendy
            http://www.pinterest.com/wlrich2/boards/

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              #7
              Ok, you've given a lot of information, a lot ideas and a lot of figures! But I do have one question. Let's say I decide to do a weekly or monthly block for my 'weather' quilt. Can I just go outside and determine what I feel and put that into my quilt. Not what I read, not what I watch on tv, but what the weather says to me that day, personally and translate that into my quilt. So, I guess I'm asking, do I have to go by a weather chart or a temperature, or can I be more 'artsy' and translate the weather on a personal level..how it makes me feel, what I see, the true temps and /or any of the above?
              😎 Happy Thread tails and trails

              Sage

              Comment


                #8
                It’s your quilt... I would think you could do whatever you want. I think it would be cool to see how you interpret the weather in your quilt!

                Comment


                  #9
                  I second tfrankum's comment. There's nothing wrong with making your weather quilt a subjective record rather than an objective one. That's actually a cool idea. You could probably do a 'mood' quilt the same way.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think I have my design worked out but I won’t be able to get started on it until the end of February. In the mean time I’ll be recording the temperatures. I’m helping out my daughter who just had a double mastectomy. If you don’t do monthly breast exams, do them. Her cancer was found early because her doctor found the lumps during her annual physical.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm already behind! LOL

                      I haven't been able to figure out a good temperature range - as mentioned above, I'm in Texas, so there are times when highs/lows stay within about 10 degrees of each other and days like last week where we get tornadoes & snow in the same 24 hours, lol

                      I think I may do flying geese, because I'm also doing Bonnie Hunters 2019 mystery and there's a billion of them, might as well keep going, lol.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'm just recording highs and lows so far, and only weather phenomena if unusual. A bit boring so far in Januaray as we are above average temps.

                        Enjoy life and do what makes you happy. Everything else will follow.

                        Every day I try to do one thing that challenges my comfort zone.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I think I need to design a block for overcast/fog.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I’m glad to know we’re not the only ones dealing with all this fog! It has been miserable for a couple of weeks. Need sunshine!!!

                            Comment

                            Temperature/Weather quilt 2020

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                            Temperature/Weather quilting group
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