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    Vintage linens

    I have had fun at some estate sales and collected some pretty hankies doilies, and my favorite - embroidered dresser scarves and doilies. Some of them have hand-tatted borders. (I was so excited) I want to mix them with similar colored print fabrics kind of a crazy quilt style but instead of velvets, use cottons and lighter colors. If you have ever done this, how did you keep the embroidery from unravelling? I am going to have to cut through some of the embroidered areas. i want to make some gifts for the ladies in my family - aged 30-90, and wondering if you have any ideas? They are going to little very girly and maybe a little fragile, so I was afraid that maybe something like a tote bag would not be practical. Sadly I have neither the room nor the patience to make a bunch of full sized quilts, so smaller things would be better. I saw a cute "Book pillow" which props your book up at an angle and thinking my sister might appreciate that. I sure would appreciate advice from some of you talented sewers! Thankyou

    #2
    Re: Vintage linens

    Not sure this would work for you or not - I'm about halfway finished with a quilt 'throw' that will be king-sized using some embroidery pieces, lace, some doilies, crochet, ribbons, etc. I'm using Elmer's School Glue to fasten the pieces to a muslin backing and once the glue has dried (it can be hurried by ironing over the piece) I then stitch around the edges and through the larger pieces using some decorative stitches. Unfortunately I don't have pictures right now, but I would venture to say if you absolutely had to cut through hand-stitched embroidery that you may want to either glue the edges and perhaps use a satin stitch over them, or turn the raw edge under. A lot will depend upon how detailed you may want and whether or not it would be absolutely necessary to cut a piece of handwork . . . no surefire method, but something to think about.
    Sometimes, when there's a raging fire,
    it's best not to try to put it out with gasoline.

    "...pal carajo con la negatividad..."

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      #3
      Re: Vintage linens

      I would suggest adding some fusible interfacing on the backs to keep the embroidery from fraying. Other than that, I think it would be a great idea. I had some of my grandmothers old hankies framed between two pieces of glass.
      No act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.
      Aesop

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        #4
        Re: Vintage linens

        Sandy, looking forward to your finished piece. I have been
        buying old linens when I see them for a future quilt.

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