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Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

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    #16
    Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

    I put down old shower curtains on floor or bed. Then I put backing down and then batting. I roll up the batting and spray about 12" press down and proceed down the quilt. Then I do the top the same way. I also iron the top and back to help "stick" everything down. I find that after the shower curtains are dry they are no longer sticky.

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      #17
      Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

      I too am loving the pool noodle idea. Now to see if I can find some noodles!
      sigpic:icon_hug: Iris Girl = April = fabric, Fabric FABRIC!!
      Time spent with cats is never wasted.
      Sigmund Freud

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        #18
        Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

        I love using 505 spray! If I had to use pins I would probably not quilt. My dad has a big workshop with a large work table that I use to layer & baste my quilts. We leave the door open & air on for ventilation. If possible I would use spray outdoors the quilt on a table or two or even on a concrete slab or driveway.

        I layer & spray baste my quilts pretty much like Vonnie mentioned. You can clamp or tape backing to a table or tape it to the floor or concrete. If you spray inside I would cover the area around with an old sheet, newspaper or garbage bags.

        505 spray will hold a long time....even months long. Try a small can and see if you like it. Good luck.
        "I'm putting together a list of 100 reasons why I am NOT relentless!" - Sue Heck, The Middle

        Leonard: For God's sake, Sheldon, do I have to hold up a sarcasm sign every time I open my mouth?
        Sheldon (intrigued): You have a sarcasm sign?

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          #19
          Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

          I have one machine set up to piece with a 1/4 inch guide, and my other one to quilt. That way, I can leave my walking foot on for a long time. I also have another machine with no special feet or guides that I use for things that don't need that stuff. That way, I don't have to remove my guide or my walking foot very often.
          Oh, I have more then 3 machines, but these are what I use the most.
          I spray and pin. I put a large plastic sheet down to keep any over-spray off the floor.
          Pieced By Me! :icon_wave:

          Pre-cut Yardage Chart

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            #20
            Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

            Hi Katie bloom,
            I've used spray basting before and it works really well but it's not my favorite. You really have to be careful with overspray and it's highly recommended you use it with your windows open. That's not an option in the dead of winter in the Midwest. If you decide to try it, definitely get the 505. In my personal experience the June tailor brand was awful .. came out clumpy and smelled.

            I've also used fusible batting before with good results. It's not the easiest to find in my area. Connecting Threads has it and right now their batting is on sale. I've found this works best on smaller projects as you really need to iron the backing and then the quilt top to the batting. I have a big board so that helps. How I use it is to lay the batting on my ironing board then place the backing. Starting in the middle I iron towards one end. Then flip it around and do the other half. Repeat with your quilt top. Then I'll check the back to make sure I haven't gotten any wrinkles. Then let it sit for about a day. It works really well it's just physically harder with much bigger than a 50 x 60 Quilt .. for me anyway.

            So my current favorite is pin basting. First I use big safety pins .. I think they're 2 or 2 1/2 inch. I clear my cutting table and use blue painters tape and tape the top half of the backing down. Get it really tight, moving and adjusting where needed. Then I lay the batting down and then the top. I try to avoid putting pins where I know I'm going to quilt ... I get that right about half the time . I also use a Kwik Clip made by Paula Jeans Creations. I'm right handed so I pin with my right hand and hold the Kwik Clip in my left. This tool helps close up the pin and avoid hand strain. It feels really clumsy at first.. so if you get one, practice with it a bit. Once you get it, your hands and fingers will thank you .

            I haven't used thread basting but plan to learn. I'd like to do more FMQ and am afraid I'll get caught up and run over a pin.

            Changing feet, especially that walking foot. Sometimes it feels like you have all thumbs but just keep practicing it and you'll be a pro in no time. Also if your machine came with a less than stellar screwdriver go check out your local hardware store. A quality screwdriver is an important part of your sewing tool box and I'm always less than impressed by what most sewing machines come with.

            Needles ... i never used to think this but now I do. The more you change them, the happier you'll be with stitch quality.

            And most important.. have fun!!
            Sherrie
            Last edited by sherriequilts; September 16th, 2017, 10:52 PM.
            Life ain’t always beautiful
            But it’s a beautiful ride - Gary Allen

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              #21
              Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

              One of the benefits of thread basting with Sharon Schambers method (that I did not mention) is that it gives you a chance to deal with threads from the edges as you go, as you unroll the layers to baste. I look at the top of the board holding the quilt and trim or move any dark threads that lay on a light area as i u roll it for each section. So no more shadows of dark threads in the finished quilt ruining the finished look.

              And board and thread basting gives me a chance to think thru any problem areas I will have to deal with in FMQ. Like a block that wants to "poof up" a bit - I can use my hand to ease it into place in the basting and then thread baste it the way I need to. As I mentioned, I can stitch very close to or even occasionally thru or across the cotton tatting thread, so this is a great way to deal with problems before FMQ. Safety pins and pinmoor-pins don't let me stitch up to them - have jammed them into the foot and wedged them under the needle trying. So I much prefer thread basting.

              If you do use spray basting, I recommend doing it outside, especially if you have a gas water heater or gas pilot lights anywhere, or if smokers will be around. That stuff is flammable and disperses into the air.

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                #22
                Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                thank you all for suggestions and encouragement-since I posted my ??s, I have learned that some quiiters baste with washable Elmer's glue.....plan to just try all the options and see how each goes. Thanks again for all your ideas and expertise. Katiebloom

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                  #23
                  Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                  I spray baste in my garage with the door open. I center my backing on a folding table face down, center the batting over it and smooth out any wrinkles. I then fold down the batting from the center, spray and work my way up. Same process in the opposite direction to get the other half done. I then repeat the process with the top. I use 505, and am not bothered by any odor. If I were, I would try letting the sandwich sit in the garage for an hour to let it air out.

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                    #24
                    Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                    I've pieced with a walking foot on before. It's not too bad, actually, even when working with batiks. I haven't ever tried quilting with a walking foot though. If I quilt by machine, I put on the hopping foot and lower the feed dogs. I have never tried piecing with a hopping foot on, but I don't think it'd work very well.

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                      #25
                      Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                      Basting is my least favorite thing. I tried pins, then curved safety pins, but I hated this task. So I now spray baste. I dislike it, spray cans always clump up and won’t work for me. I am thinking of painting with glue next time. I risk a lot to make things easier.

                      This is what I do
                      1, Go outside and lay down a king sized old sheet. I put rocks on corners so it doesn’t blow away. I have to spray outside because I worry about smell.

                      2. Bring iron outside and plug it in in outside plug. Heat it up so it will retain heat when unplugged

                      3, Lay batting down and smooth smooth smooth .

                      4. Smooth backing on top of batting. . Carefully fold down top half of batting and spray batting . Carefully smooth backing back on batting. Iron that.

                      5 Repeat on bottom half of backing.

                      6 Flip so backing is now on sheet and do same thing for quilt top.

                      The ironing seems to set the sandwich, and helps with wrinkling.

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                        #26
                        Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                        some things to note with spray baste like any spray can if your storing in a cold area bring them in and let them warm up to room temperature. If I am in a hurry I put them in a cut of warm water not hot. shake the can's really well this is often the cause of globbing keep the spray head clean spray evenly but lightly. I have never had a problem like some mentioned and I go thru tons of the June or 505 but I did a lot of work with finish sprays that taught me tricks for the use of any canned spray item. Do make sure the spray is dry before sewing. I always set the spray by pressing front and back of the quilt sandwiches this dries the glue and sets the pieces together. I always use in well ventilated areas for safety or if your sensitive get a mask a good one not just a dust mask.
                        Use it up, wear it out, make it do or do without.

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                          #27
                          Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                          Good Morning All! Wish I would have seen this discussion earlier. I use the pool noodle method with elmers glue. I have horrible allergies. The last time I used basting spray I was sick for weeks. So be careful if you have allergies.

                          Also, anyone that wants to try the pool noodle method you can also use pipe insulation that is available at any home improvement store. You can buy in various lengths. I use folding tables butted up together against a wall. Just be light handed with the glue and dry iron it as you go it will dry the glue. you can iron on the folding table as long as you don't leave it just sit face down. Never had a problem.

                          About changing needles, I am picky with my machines, very picky. I wind up four bobbins sew or quilt till those run out. Then I stop clean the machine and oil depends on which one I am using and change the needle. A needle is such a small price to pay when compared to having the machine repaired. When I took the 15000 in for service this summer the tech was pleased that I had taken such good care of her.

                          So thats my two cents

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                            #28
                            Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                            I have a pretty sensitive nose, and have some sneezing/instant congestion reactions to some scents, but not to the 505 spray. Sometimes I don't even ventilate the house, if it's a small job. (I have a pretty big house, tho) And my DH, who doesn't like the smell of anything, usually doesn't even know I have used the spray when he comes in. I would advise those of you with moderate allergies/sensitivities to give it a try before you turn your back on this fantastic method of basting.

                            One of my friends asked how much to use: "Is it like spraying your hair with hairspray, or killing a bug?" I could imagine her beading in on a poor hapless spider, emptying half a can of insecticide on it. But, yes, less is better. A very light spray will do the job. And there can be overspray, but you could use an old sheet, plastic tarp, even newspaper spread out. And you can get the whole quilt basted in about half an hour, with all the straightening and smoothing you want.

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                              #29
                              Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                              I've recently seen quite a few references to basting with Elmer's glue and I'm intrigued. Can someone please describe that process?
                              Toni ... If I keep sewing long enough, will they make their own dinner?

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                                #30
                                Re: Spray vs pin Basting and needle changing

                                I’m curious as well ... think I’ll start a new thread and see what folks say
                                Sherrie
                                Life ain’t always beautiful
                                But it’s a beautiful ride - Gary Allen

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