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  • fusible batting

    I am getting ready to sandwitch together using fusible batting. with no super large ironng board what s the best way to put t together? anyone have any great ideas? I cant manhandle anything as I have crushed fractions in my back. seems as tho it should be easier but don't how to go about it? thanks for any ideas in advance.

  • #2
    Re: fusible batting

    The only time I have every used fusible batting is when I make bags. Is it Pellon 987F? I'd be interested to know.
    pat.

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    • #3
      Re: fusible batting

      I wonder if you were to lay the quilt sandwich on the floor then iron it on the floor. Would the iron damage anything underneath it?

      Then again, your back might not be able to take the strain. Do you have anyone, like a teenager, who would iron it for you?
      Vonnie

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      • #4
        Re: fusible batting

        Remember to press - not back and forth ironing.
        Vonnie

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        • #5
          Re: fusible batting

          Originally posted by bubba View Post
          The only time I have every used fusible batting is when I make bags. Is it Pellon 987F? I'd be interested to know.
          There is actual fusible quilt batting for quilts. It is a lot thicker than fusible fleece. I never used it though because I wasn't sure how you would keep the back from fusing to what ever surface you used to iron on. It doesn't have paper backing.
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          • #6
            Re: fusible batting

            Originally posted by K. McEuen View Post
            There is actual fusible quilt batting for quilts. It is a lot thicker than fusible fleece. I never used it though because I wasn't sure how you would keep the back from fusing to what ever surface you used to iron on. It doesn't have paper backing.
            I dislike fusables because of that dang paper backing. I can't imagine trying to de-paper an entire quilt. That said, I guess you'd have to sandwich all 3 payers before ironing. That can't be easier than spray and/or pin basting.
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            • #7
              Re: fusible batting

              Its Hobbs heirloom Fusible cotton batting. Queen Size 90"x108". I thought it might be easier for me. I ordered it from Shabby Fabrics now I am wondering if i made a mistake by getting it. I dont know anyone around here. maybe my son will help me out.

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              • #8
                Re: fusible batting

                Its Hobbs heirloom Fusible cotton batting. Queen Size 90"x108". I thought it might be easier for me. I ordered it from Shabby Fabrics now I am wondering if i made a mistake by getting it. I dont know anyone around here. maybe my son will help me out.There is no paper backing you just iron it on.

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                • #9
                  Re: fusible batting

                  I used iron on batting for a table runner and I hated it. It would not stick and didn't iron it correctly so it stretched. I ended up pealing it off. I can't imagine doing a whole quilt with it. I think you are better off using spray. If you have a large table layer your backing, batting and quilt top smoothing it all out and spray sections. But then this is just me.

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                  • #10
                    Re: fusible batting

                    When I have a large quilt I use the spray basting and utilize the big tables in conference room at work. I use "sulky" (expensive - but you don't need the extra ventilazation like some of the others). It is temporary so quilting needs to be done within a few days after spraying. I still pin in a few places before I fold it up to take home. I use painters tape to hold the back down in place and then start the sandwich. Do you have a community center, or maybe a room in church with big tables...

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                    • #11
                      Re: fusible batting

                      I use fusible batting all the time. I put my quilt sandwich together (on my rotary mat), pin it, then iron the whole thing. Remember, you CAN use steam. I use Pellon 987F fusible because it is double-sided. Best of luck, if I can be of any help, please pm me.

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                      • #12
                        Re: fusible batting

                        By mistake I bought a package of fusible batting. I made a mess with a quilt. The quilt was stiff in spots and other spots it didn't stick at all. It may have just been me, not knowing what I was doing, but I really didn't like it. It also might depend on the brand. Sorry, I can't remember what brand it was.

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                        • #13
                          Re: fusible batting

                          Originally posted by Sewbusy1 View Post
                          I use fusible batting all the time. I put my quilt sandwich together (on my rotary mat), pin it, then iron the whole thing. Remember, you CAN use steam. I use Pellon 987F fusible because it is double-sided. Best of luck, if I can be of any help, please pm me.
                          Boy that must be one big rotary mat you have to fit a whole quilt on or am I misunderstanding?

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                          • #14
                            Re: fusible batting

                            After the third attempt using Hobbs Heirloom Fusible, I finally had success. The first two were queen and full sizes. I layered the quilts and then tried pressing, with steam. It was spotty on fusing and just wouldn't work for the rest and I ended up thread basting. Finally, on my third project, I used the fusible crib size as it was the only batting that size I had on hand. I tried layering again, but gave up - THEN I tried fusing just the backing on my ironing board. IT WORKED. Then I flipped it over and added the top and pressed that. IT WORKED. I was amazed but confused on what the difference was from my prior attempts. The batting didn't really stick to my ironing board, so was happy to see it fused when I added the top. I was pleased with the result. The quilt wasn't stiff after I washed it.

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                            • #15
                              Re: fusible batting

                              First time I used it, it was great. This second quilt gave me all sorts of problems. Finally pinned and am hand quilting. It is spotty in places too. Have no idea what the problem was except I left it overnight to get the wrinkles out before pressing. Didn't matter if steam or no steam used. Think I'll stick to glue basting. It works the best for me and is cheaper than the spray.
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