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    Working with panels

    I bought a kit from Missouri Star that has 2 panels of horses surrounded by blocks and strips. I want to make this for my niece who is getting married in Nov. Yesterday, I started cutting everything out and all went well til I got to the large panel which is supposed to be 24.5 x 42.5. It has 6 horses surrounded by a border of wood grain. The panel is so crooked that there was no way to cut it to those dimensions and keep everything squared up. One side, either the top or bottom would have white showing when I sew it because the white area is more than a quarter inch. When you look at the panel the top printed border is crooked and swags down in the middle. I am so disappointed! My first thought is to cut off most if the crooked picture and try to find a closely matching woodgrain print to sew on around the horses to make it the proper dimensions. My other thought is to square up the panel and reduce the size of all the other pieces in the quilt which means everything would have to be trimmed down. That would require lots of math
    The large panel goes across the top and it is surrounded by blocks and strips then there are 2 smaller panels at the bottom surrounded by more blocks and strips. I've cut everything else out (squares, triangles and strips) except the outside border. I am so disappointed! I will never by another panel kit again! Do any of you have any suggestions for how I can salvage this kit? I always get great advice on here so I'm counting on it again! By the way it is supposed to be a throw size of about 58 x 68 or so.

    #2
    Re: Working with panels

    I think I would contact them and ask them to ship you another but they should take a look before shipping to make sure the print is not misaligned. If all the kits are misaligned than I think they should pull the kits and ship back to the manufacturer. Plus offer you a substitute of your choice. Hopefully not all the kits are this way. Real bummer.
    https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
    Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

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      #3
      Re: Working with panels

      I have bought several panels of recent years, esp. for baby quilts. If yours is that crooked, I certainly would contact M* & ask for a replacement. They're usually pretty good about making adjustments.

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        #4
        Re: Working with panels

        For that reason I don't purchase panels any more. It certainly wouldn't hurt to ask for a replacement.
        Robin
        My Pinterest Page of the Quilts I've Made: http://www.pinterest.com/rwmomto3/quilts-ive-made/

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          #5
          Re: Working with panels

          I'll ask for a replace mentioned and see what happens. I honestly don't think they will replace it but it's worth a try

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            #6
            Re: Working with panels

            I just got 2 deer panels and one of them has a bad line (like dye didn't take well) running down towards the big deer's head, but I think I can salvage it for a matching pillow. BUT I didn't take heed from a fellow quilter here.. I cut exactly like Jenny's video and that dang left ear of the big deer, his cut up antlers I can deal with.. one normal ear and one elongated ear! I have decided to name the quilt "Lefty" in honor of the abnormal ear. My cousin will love it anyway.. we have always found a way to put "fun" in the dysfunctional things in life. So why not a deer... it will be ONE OF A KIND for sure!

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              #7
              Re: Working with panels

              I only have a few panels, but I normamly don't cut a thing until I hang up the panel to see what I'm dealing with.
              The one I did do, I cut up the strips and started sewing and when the panel came, I had to change directions.
              I ended up using it for the back.
              It was also a bit crooked. I pinned the corners, and marked them so the front corners would line up with the back corners, because the stitching was going to show.

              If matching the woodgrain pattern is impossible, I would probably try to match one of the colors of the woodgrain border, add the solid border, no wider than you need, and then trim to the measurement you expected. Even if the woodgrain part isn't even, the matching solid waving wider and narrower to fit, should blend and look like part of the woodgrain, and at least the panel will be straight at that point.
              Pieced By Me! :icon_wave:

              Pre-cut Yardage Chart

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                #8
                Re: Working with panels

                I just think that's the nature of the beast for some reason. I bought a couple of fall themed panels a couple of years ago and they both had the same issue. I think you're best bet is to do what you said -- square the panel up and then add a border to get it back to the size you need it to be. I would avoid recutting everything.

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                  #9
                  Re: Working with panels

                  Have you tried wetting it and gently nudging it to size and shape?
                  I have never seen a panel that was straight and true to grain, something bad about the printing process I guess.

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                    #10
                    Re: Working with panels

                    I have used many panels and I have never had problems, although when someone left a bit badly wet and without finishing it ironed holding the right corners, you can see the works with panels in my albums of "Plentziana" I hope your work look nece

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                      #11
                      Re: Working with panels

                      Originally posted by Claire Hallman View Post
                      Have you tried wetting it and gently nudging it to size and shape?
                      I have never seen a panel that was straight and true to grain, something bad about the printing process I guess.
                      Agree completely!

                      This seems to be a requirement for panels, there is a grid material you can purchase to block the panel. I believe it is a one inch grid usually found with the interfacing materials.
                      sigpic

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                        #12
                        Re: Working with panels

                        If the panel is not replaced: Do NOT CUT the panel ... ADD to the panel!

                        Doing so will give you a "wonky" frame around the panel, but the frame will be squared up and look intentional -- as if you planned the border that way! I say "wonky" only because the border will not be the same size all the way around your quilt; likely each side of the border fabric will go from wide to narrow. How narrow? that will depend on how "off" the panel is.

                        Add a border in a bigger size than what you'd like to end up with -- because you will be cutting away that border when you square up the panel w/ the border on it.

                        Then, you can add your other blocks around it.
                        Blessings, DramaMama


                        "May your bobbin always be full!"

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                          #13
                          Re: Working with panels

                          Another vote for dampening the panel, pinning the edges straight and gently flattening it into shape with a steam iron, then allow to dry. I have done this with quite a few panels, as they are often crooked. To get the right size without math I add a border that makes it a little bigger than I need and trim it to size. A little difference in width of a narrow border is usually not that noticeable. Use a plain fabric that does not draw attention to itself. Panels usually have borders anyway.
                          sigpicIf you can't see the mistake from the back of a galloping horse, nobody is going to notice it.

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