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Quilting a Bargello

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    Quilting a Bargello

    I am making a "wavy" bargello out of a rainbow batik jelly roll, with the addition of a couple darker strips for contrast. I am wondering how to quilt it. Thinking maybe following the flowing lines of the colors, a quilting line running diagonally through each color piece, from one side of the quilt to the other. Does that make sense?
    Anyone who has made a bargello, what did you do with the quilting? Any suggestions?

    #2
    Re: Quilting a Bargello

    I'll be interested in seeing what everyone has to say also.

    I started a bargello at the Fall Forum Retreat (with lots of help from Snippet). I have 11 strips yet to sew, I haven't touched it since the forum. I'm making it for my hubby and I want it to be a surprise so that means I have to wait till he's gone to work on it. He starts night shift next week so I hope to get the top finished then.

    I'm hoping to quilt it using my walking foot, what color of thread for quilting does everyone recommend for a rainbow bargello?
    Lori

    http://sewtimeforme.blogspot.com/

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      #3
      Re: Quilting a Bargello

      Morning Snip Snip. I have just finished a wavy Bargello doing exactly as you have suggested.

      I actually used monofilament for the quilting as I really wanted the "wave" effect to be uninterrupted and every colored thread I tried "stood out" on one or more of the coloured blocks. Even my old favourite colour soft grey. I found the monofilament easy to work with...just dropped my thread tension down a couple of numbers to compensate for the stretchiness, used aa Aurafil 50wt cotton thread in the bobbin to match my backing fabric, used a 70 microtex needle and sewed quite slowly.

      The effect turned out exactly how I envisaged it...the stitching line beautifully accentuates the waves so I am very pleased BUT a couple of things I didn't consider were......
      (1) Sewing on the diagonal meant that I had more bulk going through my harp space for a goodly period of time...ugh...exhausting despite my 10 inch space.
      (2) Sewing through every column took forever......and ever!
      (3) Sewing so densely on the diagonal skewed my quilt which was pretty square before I started quilting but afterwards I was "out" by a couple of inches! Now, this quilt is just a "practice" quilt destined to live on my caravan bed so I wasn't overly upset...simply straightened my edges and left it. To the casual eye you can't see the difference, and plopped on the bed in the little caravan you definately can't tell it is a bit skewed but if this quilt was destined for another purpose I probably would be pretty grumpy. Now this is probably just due to my stitching and another quilter with more experience and technique would more than likely have no problem....I guess.

      The first 2 pics are of the quilt after quilting and the last one is the top draped on my bed before sandwiching.
      Attached Files

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        #4
        Re: Quilting a Bargello

        Originally posted by Snip Snip View Post
        Thinking maybe following the flowing lines of the colors, a quilting line running diagonally through each color piece, from one side of the quilt to the other.
        That is exactly how I quilt all of my bargellos. I have made more than a dozen. I change the thread color to match the fabric color I am quilting through.

        As Just4me posted it is possible to see distortion through the quilt sandwich when using this technique. After I switched to an "open toe" walking foot I hardly see any distortion. Make sure you get the right open toe walking foot for your machine.

        https://www.amazon.com/Distinctive-P...ing+foot&psc=1
        Stash Treasure Acquisitions Beyond Life Expectancy. My stash keeps me STABLE, oh yeah.... and dark chocolate.

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          #5
          Re: Quilting a Bargello

          Ugh, I hadn't given a thought to which foot would be needed. I don't have a walking foot for my Singer S16, which has the large harp necessary to quilt this baby. Maybe time to buy one.
          I kinda like the idea of changing the color of the top thread to match the strips. There are 22 colors, but in actuality, probably only about 8 different thread colors would be needed, as some of the colors are very close in hue.
          And I'm also thinking it might be OK to end the quilting early on about every other color strip, as they get very narrow with those 1/2" (after seams) pieces. Then start the line of quilting again after the pieces get larger. Maybe that would alleviate the drawing up issue. ??

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            #6
            Re: Quilting a Bargello

            Do you think it would work to stitch every other one? Or would that be too far apart? Or just not look right?
            Lori

            http://sewtimeforme.blogspot.com/

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              #7
              Re: Quilting a Bargello

              It might work. I don't think it would look weird.

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                #8
                Re: Quilting a Bargello

                1. Just4me - your bargello is BEAUTIFUL! I like the idea of monofliament thread. (However, I was unsuccessful the time I tried to use it. I'll give it another try, though.)

                2. I have several bargellos on my to do list - but I haven't made any as of now. However, I did study how to quilt one of my future bargellos. The pattern shows quilting designs on the sections that are similarly colored. So, if you have a wave that is made of three different light blue fabrics, you do a design within that wave. In this way, you do not have to quilt within each block. (Hope that makes sense.)
                If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.- Zig Ziglar

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                  #9
                  Re: Quilting a Bargello

                  I actually did try using several different threads....had picked out about 6 that would cover all the different shades but the stitches still stood out too much for me. And due to my wonky vision it was near impossible for me to line up the end of one colour thread with the start of the next colour. In retrospect, perhaps I could've opted for a thinner cotton thread I guess.

                  And yep, used my good old trusty walking foot. Perhaps the top being constructed in 4 panels could lend itself to skewing if in the hands of a novice like me? Here's a couple more pics of it completed that show the quilting a bit easier.
                  Attached Files

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                    #10
                    Re: Quilting a Bargello

                    Skewed or not, just4me, it's a beautiful quilt.

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                      #11
                      Re: Quilting a Bargello

                      I must say snip snip, that if your quilt is already quilted in the photos you show of it laid out on the floor I don't see how it is skewed. It looks beautiful to me.

                      Sue

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                        #12
                        Re: Quilting a Bargello

                        Snipsnip, all the best with your Bargello...I look forward to seeing pictures when it is finished. I'm sure however you decide to quilt it, it will look terrific. Keep us posted!!!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Quilting a Bargello

                          Originally posted by wildernessquilter View Post
                          I must say snip snip, that if your quilt is already quilted in the photos you show of it laid out on the floor I don't see how it is skewed. It looks beautiful to me.

                          Sue
                          Thank you, but that is not mine. It is very pretty, isn't it? I hope I can post a photo of mine when it is finished. I am highly tech challenged.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Quilting a Bargello

                            Originally posted by just4me View Post
                            I have just finished a wavy Bargello doing exactly as you have suggested............
                            The first 2 pics are of the quilt after quilting and the last one is the top draped on my bed before sandwiching.
                            I don't have anything to add about quilting one of these but just had to say that this quilt is GORGEOUS!

                            I've been considering adding a wave bargello to my "bucket list" for a while now, but wasn't sure if I wanted to do one or not. I love blue quilts/fabric (right now I find myself with two (2!) plastic storage boxes of blue fabrics), and these pictures did it for me - definitely doing one someday!

                            I always thought they were very complicated to make, but last month I took a class at my LQS and one of the ladies in the class who's made several convinced me that they're really not hard.

                            Anyway, GREAT JOB!
                            Last edited by SherylM; October 30, 2016, 10:09 AM.
                            Sheryl

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                              #15
                              Re: Quilting a Bargello

                              I did it through the waves on the Bargello at uneven widths- this fitted the uneven sweeps of the pattern and looked a bit different . No problem from squewing because the quilting was not overly dance .

                              Best of luck

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