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Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

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    Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

    So... Let's say I decide to use my fancy decorative stitches on the top quilt squares only.

    Some of them do use a lot of thread, and I wondered if they could potentially have enough impact on the squares to change the size and make the various squares uneven in size. Does this question make sense?

    If the decorative stitches prove to be too cumbersome for layers and I want to apply them to just certain top squares - could that throw things off? Sorry I am very new to sewing!

    #2
    Re: Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

    This is Not a dumb question and it does make sense. I've never tried it, but will be interested to see what "sewing gurus" say. I have used the decorative stitches for the borders. The one thing I learned was to use my walking foot, keeps things moving together. I'll be watching for answers.

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      #3
      Re: Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

      There is a wonderful project out there done by "The Hoop Sisters" that is done on embroidery machines (sorry, can't actually be replicated on a domestic machine, or even one with a multitude of decorative stitches). It is VERY stitch intensive and is made to be done through several layers of fabric, the batting, and backing. I say this because it is designed specifically to hold the fabrics together and does not change the size of the blocks in doing the stitch out.

      Since embroidery machines typically stitch out with the fabric pieces locked into a frame that is held on the embroidery machine, I would think that if you were to layer your fabrics in an embroidery hoop (thinking the old fashioned wooden ones that you tighten with a screw) you could prevent any distortion of your block.

      Several years ago I purchased a large hoop at either Michaels or Hobby Lobby that was designed to be used with a layers quilt or quilt block and slipped under the presser foot on your sewing machine so you could hold the fabrics together and have control over your free-motion quilting or, in your case, using decorative stitches. I wound up returning the hoop because it would not fit under the shank on my machine. This, however, may be something you could look into.

      Also, as I think about this, be aware that you should definitely allow extra fabric for your block and stitch away. Later all your blocks can be trimmed to be the correct size for your project.

      I believe in your first post someone suggested that you prepare a quilt sandwich sample and try various methods. That would be the best start for your project. When in doubt give yourself time enough to run a few tests. Success is always borne from trial and error. New ideas create masterpieces.
      Last edited by Sandy Navas; October 26, 2016, 05:59 PM.
      Sometimes, when there's a raging fire,
      it's best not to try to put it out with gasoline.

      "...pal carajo con la negatividad..."

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        #4
        Re: Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

        Thank you for your replies! I think that is a good idea to just use extra fabric just in case! I may refrain from doing this for the first baby quilt project but

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          #5
          Re: Decorative stitches - Part 2 Questions

          Welcome to the forum! I agree with everyone else who says to do a test block first. This is why it's smart to get more fabric than you think you'll need for your project (not a ton; but maybe 1/4 yard or so). That way you'll have an idea as to how your blocks will turn out, and how long it takes to make each one. Have fun, and don't forget to post pics so we can see what you come up with!

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