Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stitching through fusible web

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • SewingBuddy
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    Try Titanium coated needles. The coating keeps the needle cooler and this helps to keep the adhesive from softening and sticking to the needle and thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • Iris Girl
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I also use steam a seam 2 and never have an issue. It never gums up my needle. I personally do not like heat and bond products.

    Leave a comment:


  • RiverMomm
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    Originally posted by toggpine View Post
    The WonderUnder fusible web will work too. The web will allow your machine needle to pass through. I can find it more easily around here and at a better price than some of the other fusible web options.
    If I can find it in my area, I would like to try out WonderUnder fusible web. I like the paper back fusibles a bit more than Misty Fuse but only because that is the type of product I started out using and am used to using.

    I was using the Heat n Bond lite when I had my quilting issues. I COULD quilt through it but my thread would break and my machine basically acted up. I was using a different machine than I am now and maybe it just wasn't strong enough. Maybe I didn't heat the Heat and Bond up enough to totally fuse it. Maybe is was all user error because I was a brand spanking new quilter trying out applique. Or maybe I got a bad batch of Heat and Bond Lite.

    However, I switched to Steam a Seam Lite 2 on the very next quilt and no issues at all-even using the same needle and thread (cause, well, I didn't change my needle all the often back then LOL). I'll never go back to something that has the potential of ruining my quilt or making the process harder than another product. I can never recommend Heat and Bond for quilts. For crafts, Heat and Bond is great. I recommend Steam a Seam 2 Lite or Misty Fuse especially if you are new to applique.

    Leave a comment:


  • toggpine
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    Yeah, the regular Heat N Bond was designed for no sew applique and craft bonding. We would bond the fabric to the Heat N Bond, cut out the bits we wanted to applique, iron them onto the shirt/sweatshirt, then use fabric paint to seal around the raw edges. If you got fancy, you could add glitter or other sparkles while the paint was wet.

    The WonderUnder fusible web will work too. The web will allow your machine needle to pass through. I can find it more easily around here and at a better price than some of the other fusible web options.

    Leave a comment:


  • cpwagner78
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    Thanks for the tips. I will post a picture of the the finished product. It might take a little while.

    Leave a comment:


  • bakermom
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I would try a larger needle. Since it is already applied it's too late to change, but, are you sure you used the right Heat and Bond? As Hulamoon said, the ultralite works fine-at least it has for me- but if you don't use the one made for sewing you will have trouble. I know, I've made that mistake

    Leave a comment:


  • Peggi
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I know you said you switched needles, but have you tried a larger needle?

    Leave a comment:


  • Sewbusy1
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I agree with RiverMomm. I have developed a very strong dislike for Heat n Bond. Had problems sewing it. I now use Steam a Seam Lite II, love this stuff. Never have problems of any kind. And I like to machine applique, so do quite a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I like Heat & Bond ultra lite. I never had a problem with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • cpwagner78
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    Thanks for the tips. I've been practicing my stitch length while fmq. If I go at snail's pace it seems to work a lot easier, too. I have learned my lesson with heat n bond.

    Leave a comment:


  • RiverMomm
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    I used Heat and Bond for my first applique quilt and finally had to rethink how to quilt it. I hate Heat and Bond for this very reason. In the future, Steam a Seam II lite or Misty Fuse are much more quilt applique friendly.

    For my quilt, I ended up FMQ around and up to the edges of appliques. And then changed to a heavy duty needle and stitched around the outside edge of the applique (not FMQ but regular stitching) -getting very close to the edging. Then I did minimal stitching inside each applique. Sometimes I did an echo stitch inside if the applique were small. Other times I would do some stitching that went through the whole picture of the applique. And in the end, the quilt looked pretty good. When I finished that quilt, I promised myself never to use Heat and Bond again.

    I think your quilt will work out great! It will look like you planned it that way the entire time. Good luck.
    Last edited by RiverMomm; August 20, 2016, 05:42 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • cpwagner78
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    It's thermo web heat n bond. If it is too heavy, I've already appliqued everything. So is there a solution other than hand quilting?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Stitching through fusible web

    What kind of fusible are you using? It might be too heavy.

    Leave a comment:


  • cpwagner78
    started a topic Stitching through fusible web

    Stitching through fusible web

    I have been fmq on a crib size project with appliqued strawberries. Every time I try to quilt over the fusible web, these things happen. 1st the machine skips stitches. Then the thread gets tangled and breaks. Every time. I've tried changing the needle. I've cleaned the bobbin case. The machine is a brother cs6000i. It performs great otherwise, and I have completed many large and small projects on this machine.
Working...
X