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    free motion quilting question

    So I am finishing up stipple FMQ a king sized quilt and find that I have"pinching" /little folds on my backing. Not sure why this happens as I am careful with putting the sandwich together. Thoughts?

    #2
    Re: free motion quilting question

    What method did you use to baste?

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      #3
      Re: free motion quilting question

      Did you quilt it on a long arm or on a home sewing machine? I fmq on a home sewing machine with an 11" throat. I spray baste my quilt sandwich. I have found with large quilts that I have much better results if I take the time to press the quilt sandwich on both the back and the front with a iron after spray basting. I usually use steam as well in my iron. I know others have said that they do not press their sandwich when using spray baste but that does not work for me. It could be that most of my quilts are bed size. Also I think positioning my hands correctly and moving my hands when I need to makes my quilts free of puckers.

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        #4
        Re: free motion quilting question

        Like janbee, I also use spray baste. I think it makes all the difference for me when I iron the front and back again after the quilt sandwich is spray basted together. I use 505 spray.

        Sometimes I still get some little pin tucks but they are not noticeable after the quilt is washed and dried.

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          #5
          Re: free motion quilting question

          As most of you know, I am really new to this FMQ, but...I've never used spray basting. I sandwich my quilts on a table by laying the backing down...then the batting...I smooth it and fit it to the back...then the top...smooth it with my hands and fit it to the rest. Then I begin pinning. I pin every 6 inches with big pins. THen, I turn it over and make sure that it all held together well and there are no wrinkles...then I take it to the sewing room . I have a Husqvarna with a 7 inch throat and I am doing quilts that are about 80x90 inches. I find the middle and I put the quilt into the machine.
          Next I put on my Fons and Porter quilting gloves and I hold my hands tightly about 4-5 inches apart and make certain that I feel smoothness under my hands and then I begin. I have done about 20 quilts since February and each time I am getting better. The most picking I seem to do comes at the edges when I forget that the excess curls under. I think the issue is in keeping your hands flat and not lifting them up while the machine is running
          Walk in peace with the Lord by your side.
          Terry

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            #6
            Re: free motion quilting question

            I also use spray baste and iron front and back before machine quilting. I straight line quilt never tried to FMQ. I don't get little folds if I iron my work. Give ironing a try, I think you;ll like the outcome.

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              #7
              Re: free motion quilting question

              I have never used the spray. I just use pins. I have an Elna 7200 Quilting machine. I will try the spray baste and iron along with maybe more pins.
              Thanks everyone.

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                #8
                Re: free motion quilting question

                The little tucks could be caused by the backing not being taut enough when basting. I pin baste on a long, narrow table. When I lay my backing down, I find the center of the table, and the center of the backing, then spread out the backing from the center. I clamp the backing to the table, add the batting, reclamp, add the top, reclamp. Then I pin baste from the center. When what is on the table has been basted, I unclamp, and move all three layers so that the unbasted area, next to the basted area, is on the table. I smooth and stretch the backing, clamp, and then go through the clamping process for the other areas. I keep on doing this until the whole quilt is basted.

                It is a good idea to flip it over at this time, and check the back to see if there are any tucks/folds. I don't find any. I also FMQ from the middle out. Usually focusing on 1/4 of the quilt at a time. As grammaterry said, hand placement is important, and rechecking the area to make sure there aren't any shifts to the layers.
                If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.- Zig Ziglar

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                  #9
                  Re: free motion quilting question

                  This is really good information. I was told that you can't iron once you have the batting in. I'll definitely give this a try!!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: free motion quilting question

                    Originally posted by Sylvia H View Post
                    The little tucks could be caused by the backing not being taut enough when basting. I pin baste on a long, narrow table. When I lay my backing down, I find the center of the table, and the center of the backing, then spread out the backing from the center. I clamp the backing to the table, add the batting, reclamp, add the top, reclamp. Then I pin baste from the center. When what is on the table has been basted, I unclamp, and move all three layers so that the unbasted area, next to the basted area, is on the table. I smooth and stretch the backing, clamp, and then go through the clamping process for the other areas. I keep on doing this until the whole quilt is basted.

                    It is a good idea to flip it over at this time, and check the back to see if there are any tucks/folds. I don't find any. I also FMQ from the middle out. Usually focusing on 1/4 of the quilt at a time. As grammaterry said, hand placement is important, and rechecking the area to make sure there aren't any shifts to the layers.
                    Great advise, Sylvia (just love you!).....
                    I spray baste as well.....smooth, smooth, smooth. when I recently took a walking foot quilting class? The instructor demonstrated this method....
                    Backing down, tape (masking or painters tape) the corner down. This will ensure your backing is taut, but don't pull too hard. Spray baste; with your batting rolled; center and gently roll you batting onto you backing, smoothing as you roll the batting on.
                    Spray baste again. The instructor then centered the folded quilt top and applied the top by each row (in folded fashion) while smoothing. This eliminated any puckers or buckles. The neat thing with spray basting? You don't have to remove a lot of pins to adjust!
                    Sherri

                    "Don't let someone else's ugly spoil your beautiful. " Thanks, Bubby!!!!!!

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                      #11
                      Re: free motion quilting question

                      Originally posted by Ericafox14 View Post
                      This is really good information. I was told that you can't iron once you have the batting in. I'll definitely give this a try!!
                      Please, do not iron if you are using polyester batting as it can melt. I only iron 100% cotton or 80/20 blend.

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                        #12
                        Re: free motion quilting question

                        Originally posted by RiverMomm View Post
                        Please, do not iron if you are using polyester batting as it can melt. I only iron 100% cotton or 80/20 blend.
                        Of course you can. Just set your iron for polyester.

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                          #13
                          Re: free motion quilting question

                          I have not quilted anything larger than a lap size quilt on either my DSM or LA. I've never used basting spray. I spread my backing fabric out fairly taut on the carpeted floor & pin the edges with straight quilting pins. Then lay down the batting, smoothing it out, then laying down the top. I smooth everything to get all the wrinkles out, then pin baste ~every 4". I machine baste the edges of the quilt with a long serpentine stitch that curves in & out, which allows fullness to smooth out when one is quilting. After learning the hard way, I now pin baste the extra batting & backing together along the edges to keep it from accidentally getting tucked under & stitched on. Sometimes as I quilt close to the edges, some of those basting stitches need to be removed to allow a smooth edge. One thing that helps is to spray starch the backing when pressing, prior to sandwiching. Some softer fabrics will wrinkle worse. The starching definitely helps.

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                            #14
                            Re: free motion quilting question

                            Originally posted by shirleyknot View Post
                            Of course you can. Just set your iron for polyester.
                            Thanks for the input. The directions on polyester batting says not to iron it.

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                              #15
                              Re: free motion quilting question

                              I only FMQ. At first, I had some tucks, then I began to pin much closer together - 4". I also use smaller pins to avoid having to remove them if my quilting runs near one. When I used larger pins, the length was too much to maneuver around. Hope this helps.
                              Just love everyone. I'll sort them out later. -God

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