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    Care To Share

    I have several questions that result from my latest quilt. My quilt had some dark colors and some tan or khaki colors in it. I realized too late that the thread I used to fmq was too light. I know that white has been the color of choice for many years and that some quilters use white on all colors. Do you change thread colors when fmq?

    I think I am tired of Warm N Natural batting. This is all I have ever used except for using polyester batting that bearded and turned into an awful experience. I would like something with more loft but do not want a batting that will beard. Do you have any suggestions?

    When I watch quilting videos, the thread seems to stand out. I am wondering if that is due to enlarging the images so that they can be better seen. Also the thread seems to sink into the quilt sandwich and make a more distinct pattern. Any thoughts on this?

    Does anyone else have problems seeing the design they are quilting when the thread is an exact match to the fabric? How do you handle this?

    You guys are the best.

    Jan

    #2
    Re: Care To Share

    Jan I'm not sure of answers to some of your questions but I can say that I'll often use a color other than white for the quilting. Usually I find a pearl grey or a linen (yellowy gold medium light shade) works well for a lot of the quilts I do. I usually use a white or cream for the bobbin threads because I use a lot of muslin for backing.

    I too have trouble seeing the thread patterns when the quilting thread is too close to the color of the quilt.

    I remember hearing a few times that with the quilting videos the person often uses a contrasting or darker thread so people viewing the video can see the pattern better. It makes sense to me for video tutorials.

    I'm sure other people see and do other things too :-)
    https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
    Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

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      #3
      Re: Care To Share

      Thread color is a choice depending on what you want to accomplish. A neutral or coordinated thread to match you fabrics will not show too much. I use this to quilt if I want the piecing to show most. A contrasting thread would be used if you want the quilt design to show more. As I am not good with FMQ, I opt for the first. Usually I stick with ecru or grey tones that blend well with all the fabrics in my quilt. You can change thread colors as often as you please. Just do what looks best to you.

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        #4
        Re: Care To Share

        One wall hanging I did on my longarm, I think I changed thread colors about 5 times. I also try to use matching thread in the bobbin. The times I don't is when I use a variegated thread on top. Then I try to match the bobbin thread to the backing fabric.

        I still have some trouble getting tension just right when using a different thread color in the bobbin. Little dots of color pops through.

        Like Carly Wolf I like to use a light grey or a light tan color if doing all over quilting going over multiple colors. I'm getting ready to do a quilt for a friend of DH's that has a lot of photos (Spoonflower is great for photos on fabric) I plan on doing grid quilting over the photo's using a light grey - I figure it will show the least especially since there's a lot of sky in some of them.

        Signature has a thread called Mother Goose that is a gold color that looks great against a lot of colors. I know some don't like Signature thread because of the lint, but my machine loves Signature thread - it works better with it than a lot of the other name brands. Have not tried M* thread yet but might if they come out with the big cones for longarm machines.
        Vonnie

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          #5
          Re: Care To Share

          Jan, you might find this article interesting in regard to choosing threads. http://theinboxjaunt.com/2014/11/12/...tion-quilting/

          If I want to see the definition of my designs, I use 40wt. I like the varigated, but some of them have a sheen and I must be careful when I end to make sure my last stitches are very tiny to anchor the thread. I've used some that are slippery and threads will come loose if I don't take care. When I don't necessarily want or need to see the definition, I use Aurifil because I have a lot of it on hand. Of course, there are many other brands of 50wt that are just as nice.

          Sometimes I use Bottomline (60wt) in the bobbin in a silver gray or light tan. The thread is fine and sinks into the backing so I don't notice my mistakes. And, the neutral colors seem to blend in well with most prints. I never have any rules when I fmq. I try out a few threads and different weights until I find the right fit.

          In the past, I used mostly Warm & Natural, mostly because it was readily available. I've been using Hobbs 80/20 for a few years because I like the crinkle effect after laundering. I've tried Quilters Dream battings and I love them but they're considerably more expensive unless on sale. Treat yourself some day. The Quilters Dream has beautiful drape and it handles very well for FMQ.

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            #6
            Re: Care To Share

            Thread color - I'm also in the grey/ecru group, in my case because I'm not the best quilter.... I also have a green/grey/sage color that I like as a neutral. When I'm quilting something with a lot of light/dark contrast I 'audition' various shades of grey to decide whether I prefer the thread to be more noticeable on the dark or on the light fabrics.

            Batting - Quilters Dream when I have the $$ or when it 'matters'. Recently tried Hobbs Heirloom (not sure if that is different from 80/20?) and had problems with bearding - which could also have been user error :-)
            Slainte!

            Liz


            :icon_pcnoob:

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              #7
              Re: Care To Share

              please tell me what bearding is?
              Walk in peace with the Lord by your side.
              Terry

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                #8
                Re: Care To Share

                Originally posted by grammaterry View Post
                please tell me what bearding is?

                It's when the batting comes off in little balls and works its way through the stitch holes to come out on the quilt. Aggravating!

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                  #9
                  Re: Care To Share

                  Originally posted by grammaterry View Post
                  please tell me what bearding is?
                  Batting coming through the fabric, usually at the seams, but not always.

                  e: What Jean said.

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                    #10
                    Re: Care To Share

                    Quote Originally Posted by grammaterry
                    please tell me what bearding is?

                    It's when the batting comes off in little balls and works its way through the stitch holes to come out on the quilt. Aggravating!

                    My experience has been that bearding is caused with some batting when the batting is not layered with the "back" of the batting toward the quilt backing. See this article: http://www.apqs.com/batting-has-an-up-and-down/
                    If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.- Zig Ziglar

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                      #11
                      Re: Care To Share

                      I sometimes change thread when FMQ. I made a king size quilt that had different colored thread in each cut piece. I think it is a design decision, and can be something to consider and even test out before actual quilting. I have never used white for an all over design. I prefer colors like cream, beige, taupe.

                      I don't have much advice about loft and battings, I am still experimenting. I believe, though, that polyester batting has the most loft (and sometimes difficult to machine quilt because of that). But there are 80/20 and 70/30 battings that combine cotton (the higher number) with polyester.

                      When quilting, the weight of the thread affects how well the thread stands out. Usually 50 weight thread, which is a 'go to' thread for piecing, will also sink into the fabric when used for quilting. This is good if you want the design to show, but not necessarily the thread. If you want the thread to show, experiment with the lower weight threads, and also a longer stitch. I personally think that the lower weight cotton threads show up more than the lower weight poly threads, JMO. When I want the thread to really show, I will use a 30 weight cotton thread (#90 needle), and set my stitch length to 3.5 or 4. In my bobbin, I will use a 50 or 60 weight thread (often the 60 weight 'bobbin thread' from Superior Threads). I have a 28 weight cotton that I thought I would use on a past project, but as it was purchased online, I found that the color wasn't right. I am looking forward, though, to using it and seeing how it stands out. I would use a #100 needle with it.

                      I have had to do some quilting with black thread on black fabric - oh - I couldn't see a thing! I try to avoid that now. Yes, it is hard to see the design when the thread absolutely matches the fabric. If you are using a poly thread, it may be easier to see because it has a sheen to it that most cotton threads do not. So poly might help in these instances.
                      If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.- Zig Ziglar

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                        #12
                        Re: Care To Share

                        I always use King Tut 40wt for the top and So Fine 50wt in the bobbin. It's what works best in my long arm. The only time I have used white thread was a design choice where I wanted to emphasize texture in the white background of the quilt. Then I used a variegated thread in the print blocks. So much fun.

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                          #13
                          Re: Care To Share

                          I usually use white or natural for quilting. The exception would be if the backing is dark, then I try to match it. Once in a while I will use a specialty thread for quilting, like variegated.
                          I use Warm and Natural or Warm and White(or a similar type) all the time. I stick with what I know works for me.

                          The attached photo shows one where I used a dk. blue for quilting since the backing was a dk blue. You really can't see it against the prints.
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by bakermom; August 20, 2016, 02:39 PM.
                          “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

                          ― Albert Pine

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                            #14
                            Re: Care To Share

                            HI. I. Have used wool batting for the last few quits. I LOVE IT.
                            Shelley

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                              #15
                              Re: Care To Share

                              I used to be a W&N girl until I tried Quilter's Dream. Haven't looked back since. It is aptly named, a dream to quilt, and dreamy to sleep under.

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