Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Batting for quilts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Batting for quilts

    I've been making regular blankets for awhile now and I'm just beginning to make quilts. My question: I love soft quilts and the quilt I'm making right now I plan on layering with cotton batting and a layer of high loft polyester. Is there an alternative way to do this because it can get quite expensive on a king size quilt? Thanks for any help in this. Katherine

    #2
    Re: Batting for quilts

    Dream Puff batting is poly and pretty high loft. Makes a very soft and chunky quilt bc the batting is so thick. Also is very warm. Why do you want to put 2 layers of batting in? To make a thicker quilt or you are trying to make something warmer? I have never heard of double batting a quilt. Hope you aren't planning on hand quilting it. Can u share more details

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Batting for quilts

      I asked this question a while back here : http://forum.missouriquiltco.com/qui...s-batting.html

      I've decided to use 2 layers of 100% wool batting & cotton backing fabric. I haven't gotten to the quilting stage yet so can't tell you how that's going to go. I have confidence

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Batting for quilts

        Okay! But may I strongly suggest you make a little sample piece of all your layers and try quilting it before you put your entire quilt together. If you decide to use all that many layers, basting it is gonna be a beast. Good luck. Hope it all turns out great for you.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Batting for quilts

          I have to agree with jjkaiser. It sounds to me like you're trying to get the loft of a comforter in a quilt. I would just go with one layer of higher loft batting. Do some research to see which battings provide the most warmth, otherwise, I would probably buy a down comforter and make a pretty cover for it. A really great way to get that soft and puffy look is to insert the comforter inside the cover and then hand stitch or machine stitch it closed. Pin it every six inches or so across and down the quilt. This will hold the layers together and act as a marker when you're ready to tie it. Take a long needle with heavy duty thread, yarn or a full skein of embroidery floss and tie it with a square knot at each place where you've placed a pin. I've done this as have others here on the Forum. I did this with an old quilt that was in bad shape. I didn't want to toss it so I changed it by covering it. It is super warm. I've had it for over thirty years and it's still being used. It's heavy and therefore it is quite warm.
          Last edited by rebeccas-sewing; May 7th, 2015, 02:16 AM.
          Goodbye Europe! Hello California! Home sweet home.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Batting for quilts

            If you want loft, use high-loft polyester batting.
            If you want warmth, use wool batting and flannel backing.

            If you use two layers of batting, and quilt it yourself, it will hurt your back and neck and will be a beast to maneuver!!!
            Yes, you can always tie the quilt instead of quilting it, like Rebecca said.

            Minky/Fleece backing will give you a very soft/cuddly quilt.
            Preeti
            http://sewpreetiquilts.blogspot.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Batting for quilts

              Last week I took a quilt top, backing, and batting to my local long arm quilt lady. I gave her a Warm and Plush, which is a cotton batting that is twice as thick as normal. It looks and feels noticeably thicker. Maybe try that.

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Batting for quilts

                If you want something high loft, I very much recommend The Warm Company's Soft Soft High Loft batting which has a 3/4 inch loft (I believe is that highest you can get). I recently used it for a quilt for our bed and absolutely love how warm, light and snuggly it is. It feels like a cross between a comforter and a quilt. Since I only have a small home sewing machine, I kept the quilting very simple, using straight lines that are 10 inches apart and tied it in between so that it would stay super-soft.
                Attached Files

                Comment

                Working...
                X