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    FMQ on a machine

    Since I am new to this, here is something I can't seem to figure out. I have read in many another posts that when you use your machine to free motion quilt like meandering (I think that's the term rather than stippling which would be a tighter pattern), one should always start in the middle of the quilt so as not to have it pucker and allow for shifting. I understand that - it makes sense, but is that true when meandering too? Every time I try to eye the back of a meandered quilt, granted it is a hard pattern to follow with your eyes but it never shows that any are started towards the middle.

    #2
    Re: FMQ on a machine

    It is true with any pattern. Starting in the middle allows you to be able to work all the wrinkles out toward the edges.
    K is for Karen 😊​..................
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      #3
      Re: FMQ on a machine

      As above, usually as with a bigger quilt you would only need to fit half under machine max. Guess on a smaller table runner/baby quilt you could start one side/corner and work across, 'smoothing' if necessary the fabric out.The point is not to work from both sides inwards. Good luck

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        #4
        Re: FMQ on a machine

        [QUOTE=KerryA;507685]Since I am new to this, here is something I can't seem to figure out. I have read in many another posts that when you use your machine to free motion quilt like meandering (I think that's the term rather than stippling which would be a tighter pattern), one should always start in the middle of the quilt so as not to have it pucker and allow for shifting. I understand that - it makes sense, but is that true when meandering too? Every time I try to eye the back of a meandered quilt, granted it is a hard pattern to follow with your eyes but it never shows that any are started towards the middle.[/QUOTE

        Stippling is really meandering where the lines do not cross. You can have tight or open stippling. Both are forms of continuous line FMQ. It is hard to tell where the FMQ starts because you should draw up your bobbin thread to the top before beginning to FMQ. But starting in the center and working your way out is best because it does help to eliminate puckers and also keeps you from sewing and sewing and then getting stuck in the middle to stop and bury your thread, which makes it more obvious than starting.
        My soul is fed with needle and thread, my body with chocolate!

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          #5
          Re: FMQ on a machine

          No matter the size of the quilt, always start in the middle & work out toward the sides. The only time I don't do this, is if I'm cross hatching. Then I start in one corner, sew to the opposite corner (on the diagonal), then work out on either side of the middle line. JCY

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            #6
            Re: FMQ on a machine

            It may not be easy to see. I mark mine and end on the same line. I kind of go in a circular pattern. You should start in the middle. I don't always if there aren't going to b any crossed lines, if doing a smaller quilt.
            Blankets wrap you in warmth, quilts wrap you in love

            Marilyn......
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