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  • LorraineRob
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I've done some quilting on a small wall hanger today, SITD and noticed some movement. Now, I'm new to all this so might be my fault anyway, but judging by this, I'm pretty much convinced that starting in the centre is the way to go. Will probably still do my SITD round the blocks on my big quilt though.

    Thanks so much for your input ladies.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lindagie
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I just started that same class and got to the part where she starts on the end and does the borders first. I had always been told to start in the middle and work your way out too. I wasn't convinced, but I will watch that part again before moving on to see what else she does. I could almost see starting on one end and moving over to the other, but wasn't sure that doing all the borders first would be a good thing. I may try this on a baby quilt first and see what happens. I think it might depend on your overall design too? I can see outlining each of your blocks and then doing the inside of each one.

    Leave a comment:


  • katier825
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Originally posted by LorraineRob View Post
    I was looking at something today about quilting in quadrants Sandy. Seemed to make sense.

    Anyway, I've got another idea and would like your opinions. See, my batting arrived today but it's still in the wrapper...I'm terrified of starting to quilt. It's gone together so well, I just know I'm going to ruin it, lol.

    So, I was wondering: as my quilt is a sampler and has 12 inch blocks with sashing..would it be OK to SITD around each block and sashing and THEN work on whichever part I wanted to? I still don't actually know WHAT I'm going to do, probably just straight lines but would still like your thoughts. I figured that everything would be stable if I did this.
    If you are going to SITD the whole quilt first, you can then quilt each block in any order after that. The SITD will hold things in place. Same general guidelines apply, start the SITD at the middle and work your way out. I have even basted a grid with water soluble thread, then quilted with regular thread after that on a quilt that I didn't want SITD. Once washed, the water soluble thread disappears, which is great if you are quilting an overall pattern vs a block by block design.

    Leave a comment:


  • ilive2craft2
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Originally posted by LorraineRob View Post
    Well, before I start anywhere, I have to pluck up the courage to actually start, lolol. I'm scared stiff of mucking my quilt up so have left it and made a small wall hanger. Gutless..that's me!
    You are not gutless - you are being practical. Practicing on a small wall hanging as your first attempt at quilting is a good thing. You will gain confidence on that project. Now, go get started on the quilting of the small wall hanging and remember to breathe. Stop every so often and relax your shoulders. Most importantly, have fun!

    Leave a comment:


  • LorraineRob
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Well, before I start anywhere, I have to pluck up the courage to actually start, lolol. I'm scared stiff of mucking my quilt up so have left it and made a small wall hanger. Gutless..that's me!

    Leave a comment:


  • Annav
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Spray basting is excellent, but a little goes a long way! Too much and it will gunk up your needle. Pin basting is also good, especially for larger quilts, but there is still the chance of the fabric shifting no matter what kind of basting you use.

    when I first learned to sew, it was not by machine, but hand sewing -- needlepoint, crewel, embroidery, cross stitch. In almost every medium, I was taught to start in the middle and work out to the edge, and I do the same with quilting. Start in the center and work mostly in quadrants. If you make a boo boo, you compensate better starting from the center and working out. If you make a booboo on the edge, by the time you get to the middle, you have no room to compensate. This is particularly true with cross stitch and needlepoint. Also, depending on what kind of FMQ or SITD you do, if you start on the edge and work your way to the center, you are now stuck in the center of the quilt with no where to go. You are then forced to break thread and start over again. If you are doing a continuous line FMQ stitch, your line is now broken.

    With that being said, there are no quilt police that will come and arrest you if you start on the edge and work your way to the center or across the quilt. But if it were me, I'd start in the center.

    Just saying.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sheena
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I spray baste to within an inch of its life, then I put pins in. There's no chance of the fabric moving! Then I start at the edges.

    BUT I do use a lot of spray.

    Leave a comment:


  • carolyn125
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I also saw on line a tutorial from a lady who divides her quilts into four quadrants. The lower right quadrant gets quilted first and started at the bottom left of that section. It's quilted going back and forth but it's important that your quilting stops at that section's right upper corner. Turn your quilt a quarter turn and repeat the process. I quilted a queen size quilt using this method and it worked extremely well

    Leave a comment:


  • LorraineRob
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I was looking at something today about quilting in quadrants Sandy. Seemed to make sense.

    Anyway, I've got another idea and would like your opinions. See, my batting arrived today but it's still in the wrapper...I'm terrified of starting to quilt. It's gone together so well, I just know I'm going to ruin it, lol.

    So, I was wondering: as my quilt is a sampler and has 12 inch blocks with sashing..would it be OK to SITD around each block and sashing and THEN work on whichever part I wanted to? I still don't actually know WHAT I'm going to do, probably just straight lines but would still like your thoughts. I figured that everything would be stable if I did this.

    Leave a comment:


  • mommadeb
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    My grandma taught me to ALWAYS start in the center and I do.

    Leave a comment:


  • easyquilts
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I think it would be risky to start with your borders.... The fabrics will be pushed toward the center, and you might end up with a puffy middle... I start as near the center as I can, but if I'm c king S ITD....which I hate....I start at middle of the hop of the quilt, and go straight down... Then work each line from that center.....same with crosshatching.

    Some people start in a too corner, and quilt in a quadrant....

    Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kateskloset
    replied
    Re: Quilting?




    Also, after I stitch around the borders I put a basting stitch at the edge about 1/8" from the edge of the fabric. This has really helped my outside border stay straight and not shift at all.

    That is a great idea! I start in one corner and work on small areas meandering (FMQ) until I get it done. I sometimes have a problem with the backing folding behind itself. I have had to rip out a little quilting several times. I am going to try that basting stitch around the edge, that should remedy that!

    Leave a comment:


  • Lynn Ramsey
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    I have been Machine quilting for over 15 years I am a long arm for customers for 15 years. I would never recommend doing the borders first. If you are using your regular machine at home I would start in the middle. Fabric will shift, it is woven thread, when you have pieced work and your fabric is going in all different direction it will not always lay the same. When start quilting, depending on how much quilting you are going to do it can make you quilt ripple for lack of a better word. So when you get to your borders you can have a real problem. Even on a long arm with mitered corners the border can and does more than not ripple. Hope some of this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ahamblin
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Also, after I stitch around the borders I put a basting stitch at the edge about 1/8" from the edge of the fabric. This has really helped my outside border stay straight and not shift at all.

    I think the other part of starting with the borders is spray basting the quilt. I can see there being a much bigger problem with fabric shifting when it is only pinned but spray basting really seems to hold the quilt sandwich in position. I pinned my first quilt probably every 3 inches and did have problems with the fabric moving slightly. That and it killed my back and knees. After I saw reviews on spray basting I tried it and will never go back to straight pinning again. As I stated I am new to quilting but always looking for new techniques, especially the ones that have valid arguments about why it works.

    I think this is one of the things I love about quilting and this forum. There are numerous ways to do everything and you find the technique that works best for you. No one says "this is the only way" just "this is what works for me".

    Ann

    Leave a comment:


  • Kgrammiecaz
    replied
    Re: Quilting?

    Originally posted by Ahamblin View Post
    I am not an expert quilter. I did take the Quilting Big Quilts on Small Machines on Craftsy. She advised quilting the borders first (straight line) then working your way to the middle. Her explaination was that as you stuffed the quilt into the throat that part was stitched and stabilized. I did try it on my last two and didn't have any puckers and it worked qreat. You might check out her class.
    I took that class, and I think her reasoning was the border was as straight as it ever would be so she tacks it down. I would have to watch the class again to be sure. I use my walking foot and do big stitches around my border, then start from the middle. No problems so far.

    Leave a comment:

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