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    A very newbie question...

    I apologize if this is a dumb question, but I am brand new (am still considering how to make my first project (trying very hard not to feel overwhelmed!)) I started thinking about the quilting part. I have a home machine - that I can get the free motion quilting foot for - but how can I do anything bigger than a small project? I was thinking of perhaps making squares and quilting each piece individually before sewing it together. Is that how it's done? It seems like it might break up the continuity of a full fledged quilt.. but maybe not? Can a full sized quilt be done on a home machine?

    By the way... hello everyone!

    #2
    Re: A very newbie question...

    I had a quilter tell me she FMQ a queen size quilt on her domestic machine. However...I would never attempt that. It's a lot of work just to piece a queen size quilt, let alone quilt it! Anything larger than a lap size I send out to a LAQ. If you just are beginning, I would not recommend quilt as you go. Enjoy learning to piece a simple pattern before attempting to quilt. There are many beginner patterns on this forum with the tutorials & on many web sites. YouTube has many instructional tuts. on how to cut fabric, how to piece, etc. The info. available is vast. Just decide on a simple pattern & go for it! Start small with a baby quilt or a wall hanging. Once the bug has bitten, you'll be hooked! Enjoy! JCY

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      #3
      Re: A very newbie question...

      First, let me welcome you to the forum.

      Next, no question is a dumb question. Ever. Unless I'm asking it

      I have quilted up to a twin size on my machine. Right now I've only stitched in the ditch or done diagonals since I haven't learned the art of FMQ yet. I'm sure others on the forum have done larger quilts and can give advice.

      Many posters here find Leah Day videos to be very helpful in learning techniques to FMQ large quilts on a home machine. And I think there is a way to stitch your blocks together after you FMQ them. It's called the Quilt as you go method. Since I'm a relative newbie myself, I expect other posters will correct me if I'm wrong on that last bit.

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        #4
        Re: A very newbie question...

        I think it's all up to the individual! I quilted a 90x100 quilt on my sewing machine with a 6 in throat space...it wasn't always easy...but it turned out well!
        Mary
        SW Missouri


        Smile and the world smiles with you, frown and you frown alone.

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          #5
          Re: A very newbie question...

          Welcome

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            #6
            Re: A very newbie question...

            Well welcome and don't feel stupid ever! There are some quilt as you go videos that are really good. I have to hunt down some but anyone can chime in. I have some quilt as you go placemats in my user notes (under my profile) .

            I agree to start small. Two charm packs makes a wonderful baby quilt.
            Last edited by Hulamoon; February 25, 2014, 10:10 PM.
            🌺 Lorie

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              #7
              Re: A very newbie question...

              Leah Day has an excellent quilt as you go blocks of the month quilt going on right now. Inexpensive and you learn piecing techniques as well as free motion quilting on a domestic. It is a fairly slow going program good for all. I think you might like it. I have quilted my quilts on my small babylock, an almost queen size, full size and baby quilts. I find it much easier then it looks.

              Welcome to the forum and feel very comfortable bringing all your questions and concerns here.
              Karen
              Life is short - Live everyday to the fullest

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                #8
                Re: A very newbie question...

                I do large quilts on my home machine, but I ALWAYS break them down into smaller parts. The Middle or center, then the borders and I put on a Header. Each section is quilted then put together as if you were using the Quilt as you go method. It isn't easy and takes a bit of time..and NOT for the new quilter, but It can be Done.. I stippled my last center.. good twin size piece.

                Take baby steps and don't be afraid to experiment.. It's creative and good for the inner self.
                Judy

                Click HERE to find me and My imagination
                :icon_wave:

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                  #9
                  Re: A very newbie question...

                  I've been able to sew queen size quilts on a standard machine, but it wasn't easy. If you are new, new to sewing, I wouldn't start with free motion quilting because it takes some getting use to. Straight stitching is a good kind to do and is a lot easier. And if you don't have a "Walking Foot" I would recommend getting that. It helps to move the 3 layers of fabric through without getting puckers.

                  BTW, Welcome! : )
                  :icon_hiya: Coleen

                  "I expect to pass through this world but once. Any good I can do, or any kindness I can show, let me do now, for I will not pass through this way again."

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                    #10
                    Re: A very newbie question...

                    Hi and welcome. I have gotten some very good advice from this forum. Have you heard of Craftsy classes? They are online classes that are very good. Right now they have one on quilting big projects on a home machine. You might want to check it out.

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                      #11
                      Re: A very newbie question...

                      Go to Google and search for quilt on home machine. Lots of good sites with handy tips on how to do it. A little tricky seeming but certainly not impossible.
                      Dorothy in Denver
                      Ring the bells that still can ring. Forget your perfect offering.
                      There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in.
                      -Leonard Cohen

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                        #12
                        Re: A very newbie question...

                        As others have said, Free Motion Quilting on a home machine with a small throat is possible but will be a bit more difficult but there are lots of other ways to do quilting which are a lot easier on a home machine while you get your sea legs. Stitch in the ditch or simple line quilting are both very doable on even very small home machines. My best suggestion would be to start with a baby or lap sized quilt rather than a king or queen size so you aren't so overwhelmed. Once you make one quilt you'll want to make 100 more. Also, welcome to the forums!
                        Loosely based on a true story.

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                          #13
                          Re: A very newbie question...

                          I have quilted a 98x104 on my home machine but I have a11in throat. It was a challenge but doable. I did fmq and straight lines so I used both feet. Welcome, I am new myself.

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                            #14
                            Re: A very newbie question...

                            The first quilt I ever made was a queen sized, and I quilted it on my regular machine with a throat space of 8 or 9 inches. I knew absolutely nothing about quilting, and my husband said I should use two layers of batting to make it thick. So I used two layers of Warm and Natural which made a very heavy quilt. I have a Koala sewing table that I put the quilt on so it wouldn't be falling on the floor and started quilting from the center. I really like Karen McTavish's quilting style and had bought a DVD and book showing how to do it. I used her method on large areas. I'd spent many hours machine embroidering each block, even using metallic thread in some areas, and I did echo and micro quilting in the blocks. It turned out really pretty. But some of it kept falling off the table. I ended up getting my DH to sit and hold the edge of the quilt so it wouldn't fall on the floor. After 3 days of this, DH asked if there wasn't an easier way to quilt, and I said long arms make it much easier. He then asked, "Where can we get one?" Within a week I had a Handiquilter.

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