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    Polycotton

    Cotton fabric in the UK tends to be quite expensive so I was wondering whether polycotton would be an ok substitute (65% polyester 35% cotton). Has anyone tried this with good results?

    #2
    Re: Polycotton

    Poly/cotton blends tend to pill and sometimes allow the batting to come through the needle holes. Personally, I won't use them.
    K is for Karen 😊​..................
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      #3
      Re: Polycotton

      I am a cotton person. I don't like working with any kind of synthetic to start with. I agree with Karen, also, that they will pill. I don't even have poly in my closet nor my linnen closet. Just don't like it.
      Be blessed,
      Sandy

      God has a plan and it is a good plan.

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        #4
        Re: Polycotton

        Good Broadcloth, Batiste, and Shirtings don't pill. I've made clothes that get washed more than a quilt with no pilling. Daughter has some batiste and broadcloth nightgowns that are over 15 years old and have never pilled. However, poly/cotton are lighter weight than good cotton and that could be an issue. I love permaprest Muslin. I've used that for quilt backs, crafts, embroidery, ornaments and clothes.

        Even Martha Pullen had a good poly cotton batiste that was used for heirloom quilts. And by heirloom, I mean pintucked, lace insertion, embroidery, and shadow work.

        People were making quilts from men's shirts.

        top.jpg

        Crazy quilted nightgown bodice. Nightgown is broadcloth and quilting done on broadcloth base using Asian Print cotton.

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          #5
          Re: Polycotton

          I use an 80/20 cotton/poly batting and have had no problems with it.
          Grace-Ann

          What I make with my hands, I give with my heart.

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            #6
            Re: Polycotton

            Surely its not as expensive as Australia ($22 - $25 a metre or £13 - £15) Cotton is so much nicer to work with and lasts forever.
            Jane

            http://jtct-jane.blogspot.com.au

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              #7
              Re: Polycotton

              Originally posted by Poppytree View Post
              Surely its not as expensive as Australia ($22 - $25 a metre or £13 - £15) Cotton is so much nicer to work with and lasts forever.
              Unfortunately yes if I want to buy 'character' fabric eg animals, or some kind of theme fabric. The plain or ginghams are cheaper if buying online in bulk but price increases again when having to pay postage. There isn't a LQS nearby but I may be lucky in that the lady in a small shop selling only curtain material has promised to look for cotton fabric next time she goes to restock, I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I think I would have to win the lottery to live in Australia hope you find some bargains.

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                #8
                Re: Polycotton

                How about shopping at a used clothing store? That's how we made quilts when I was a kid. And you can tell how the fabric behaves because it has already been washed several times.

                Matter of fact, there's been times when I have noticed men wearing shirts that I wished I had it to cut up into a quilt! LOL. Lusting after the shirt and not the man - must be a quilter!

                I also like using old jeans to make quilts. My sons both have quilts that I have made them and last year I made one for myself for the car out of old jeans and leftover minkee.

                Around here people like have yard sales. Do you have something similar in England? Where a family or a group of friends get together and sell items they no longer have a use for. They arrange everything in the yard with pricetags on them.
                Vonnie

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                  #9
                  Re: Polycotton

                  I have a different take on poly cotton. A lot of it used here in Hawaii for clothing. Especially childrens. I was told by a quilt shop owner that it doesn't fade as fast through washings as regular cottons. Hawaiian fabric can be very bright and needs to hold it's color. lol

                  I wouldn't have a problem with it. I was using it to make my little dresses on Etsy.


                  Roxy uses a lot of Hawaiian fabric maybe she will come by.
                  Last edited by Hulamoon; October 17th, 2013, 09:07 AM.
                  🌺 Lorie

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                    #10
                    Re: Polycotton

                    When I used to quilt (albeit not nearly like I do now..just basically used panels and SITD 20 years ago) but when I started back up 2 years ago and learned all the things that were quilting, i was still on a limited budget. I didn't know about the fabric issue and was used to buying 50/50 cotton polyester blend so it was on sale for $2 a yard so I got a ton of it....I still have most of it! I found out that not only does this blend stretch, seemingly just by looking at it, but it also is thin. I would press, starch and then cut squares, and then when I'd go to sew them together, they weren't straight or even and it made me nuts knowing how careful I had been when cutting them, yet here they are not matching. I'd wiggle things around to make them at least kind of match and then when sewn together in a block...still it was all wonky. I'd sew the blocks together best they'd match and by the time my top was done, it was pathetic! I went on to do FMQ...and the needle is hard to get through, it makes visable holes and doesn't have that kind of "soft" appearance that cotton has when FMQ'ed. After my second attempt to doing this and doing research as to why it was doing this...it comes out to the polyester being the problem...it doesn't hold shape, it doesn't work with the needle or the thread and it is to thin. Now, I use it for binding on some things...as long as I need a thin binding..this kind of fabric works well....gives that little bit of stretch to stay even with the quilt as it goes around and since there is no top stitching, the needle hole isn't an issue. But i have learned it isn't good for a larger binding...the stretch is to much from side to side and it ends up with poof bubble things in it...for lack of a better way of describing it! I have used it on bindings for placemats and doll quilts bit those need just thin, exact to the seam allowance it is covering bindings. You might want to grab a yard or two to take home and give it a try so you know if it works for you, next time you have the opportunity to get more, you'll know
                    Cheri

                    www.fabricandmemories.blogspot.com

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                      #11
                      Re: Polycotton

                      I used a blend that I had one hand to start my frog quilt for COC. I've had problems with puckering while machine zig zagging the circles in place. I've never had that problem with 100% cotton. I made try to redo those squares.
                      "I'm putting together a list of 100 reasons why I am NOT relentless!" - Sue Heck, The Middle

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                        #12
                        Re: Polycotton

                        I think I'm a little confused. I never had any pilling or puckering. When I use it I use a sharp needle and a little longer stitch length. Maybe that will help.

                        I wanted to add that the weave is tight so hence the longer stitch.
                        Last edited by Hulamoon; October 17th, 2013, 11:02 AM.
                        🌺 Lorie

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                          #13
                          Re: Polycotton

                          There is also just something special about the beautiful cottons we have now that just are a pleasure to touch, and knowing they are 100%...well, it just makes me happy and we do pay more here in Canada but there are always member day sales etc.

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                            #14
                            Re: Polycotton

                            Hi Vonnie, we don't get many yard sales but do have car-boot sales most of which just finished for the winter. I think more people must have got the quilting bug as there is a general stampede when fabric is spotted. Your suggestion about a used clothing store sounds a good idea to try out. Thanks.

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                              #15
                              Re: Polycotton

                              Cheri, thank you for describing your experience with this fabric, I don't have a lot of patience these days so I definitely won't be using polycotton, I'd be tearing my hair out. I've just found a UK website which sells pure cotton, reasonably priced too but limited choice, but then that's a start.

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