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  • katier825
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    I find it easier to handle if I "scrunch" it up rather than roll it. Make sure you support the weight of the rest of the quilt. Just allow enough free movement for the area you are quilting and a foot or so around it. When you finish that area, readjust the quilt and do the next section. It's good to start at the middle and get the worst of it over with first.

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  • MaryB
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    I'm a puddler too, Alana. No matter how hard I tried that rolling stuff just didn't work for me. I would really love a new machine with a wider throat.

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  • cyndiofthevortex
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    Hi aunteeviv!

    All the advice you've been given is great! Aren't you glad to have the forum to get such wisdom from so many? I know I am.

    I'm writing to give you encouragement! You can do it! Just a small bit at a time and it will get done!

    I quilted a king-sized quilt on my little machine and I still wonder at how I ever did it. It's beautiful though and I'm happy it's done. Go to my album and see it! (Yes, I'm a show-off. But it might inspire you!) It's called "Move Along, Nothing to See Here" and if I can do it, you can too! I'm sure you can! I used to set little goals for myself, like "I'm going to quilt two blocks today." Then when those two were finished I would be encouraged to keep going and quilt a little bit more. Every quilt is quilted one little bit at a time.

    Cyndi

    ps Two more tips not yet mentioned: use quality thread and dust out your bobbin case whenever you change bobbins to keep the lint to a minimum. Threads breaking or the machine getting sluggish are so frustrating, don't you think?

    Leave a comment:


  • Alana
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    Depending on how "large" is large...I have done a double and found if I kinda rolled it in the throat of the machine and puddled the fabric around the area I was quilting, it gave me better control. As the others have said...work only one area at a time starting in the centre, usually about a six to ten inch area. A smooth surface under the quilt and grabby gloves are most helpful at moving your fabric around while quilting. And as already said lots of support on the left hand side and back for your quilt. If you can spread it out on the left side and back, it makes it much easier to handle.

    Most important though....you must take frequent breaks!!!! If you don't you begin to tighten up in your neck and shoulders, then the back starts to hurt and you begin to rush...that is when mistakes are made....There is no hurry so relax, do some, stop and rest a bit, then go back and do a little more. If you take your time you will end up with a gorgeous quilted quilt. And you did it all yourself!!!!

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  • AnotherMadQuilter
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    Everyone has their favorite way that works for them. There are some great youtube videos showing ways to do this. I always smush and push my quilt around rather than rolling as it makes it more manageable for "me". I also take a piece of heavy clear plastic with a section cut out for needle area and tape that to my quilting machine and tables so it is REALLY slippery. This helps a lot as does wearing gloves as mentioned in a previous post. If I plan ahead, I can usually divide my quilt into 3 sections. I quilt a section leaving 1 inch unquilted where I will join the next section of quilt top and the next section of backing. I press those seams smooth and starch the heck out of it so it all lies smooth then add the batting between the top and backing. I then pin it and quilt the next section and repeat until all sections are quilted. That leaves two seams that "may" be visible on the backing depending on your backing fabric but it is pretty well hidden when you machine quilt over those seams. I try to pick up my quilting pattern where I left off on the first section and carry it forward into the next over the seams. Works for me. I've heard others mention they just leave the top and backing in 1 piece but don't add the batting until they are ready to quilt that section thus reducing the bulk of the quilt. Try a few ways and you will find what works best for "you". Good luck and happy quilting!

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  • shell.scraps
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    For larger quilts in a standard machine you need to get comfortable with rolling and working with the rolled quilt. you have to work from the center out if you are doing anything other than straight line quilting. if you are doing straight line quilting you still want to start in the center but from the center edge rather than the center center. good luck!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Onetiredmomma
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    I've got a few things Ive read, but I've not yet tried myself:
    Lines and diagonal lines are easier than any free motion pattern when working with that size.
    Wear gloves
    Roll your quilt
    Have a large extension table behind and to the left of your machine to help support the weight of the quilt
    Use some kind of clips to grab the quilt with to get a better grip.

    Leave a comment:


  • quiltingtrish
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    I've struggled with a large quilt too. I start in the middle - roll up the one side that you shove through the machine and just try to concentrate on a small area at a time. It is hard. Make sure the left side of the quilt is supported too. I usually fold it up the best I can onto the table. That's all I do - just a small area and then move on to the next. Of course I don't do anything like those fancy, smanzy designs - usually just a free motion. Definately wear gloves - it helps tremendously in moving the quilt around. And take your time. I've been known to get frustrated just cause I was in a hurry to get done and not take frequent breaks.

    Hugs,

    Leave a comment:


  • Sandy Navas
    replied
    Re: large quilts

    The only thing I can impart on this topic is to start in the middle and work your way out. Sometimes, if the quilt is too large and the 'throat' on the machine too shallow, it is recommended to do the quilting in strips. For instance, one of my huge UFOs is a king-size that I've parceled into three separate pieces to quilt. Hope someone with more experience with chime in and direct you to some tried and true assistance.

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  • aunteeviv
    started a topic large quilts

    large quilts

    Can anybody give me any hints on how to manage a large quilt in an ordinary size machine. the bulk is hard to manage...
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