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    sergers

    Forgive a newbie with 2 questions in one day.

    Do any of you serge your quilt tops? I inherited a very nice serger (Babylock Evolve). I has only been used once before my mother in law passed away. I have never used a serger before. I don't sew clothing very often. I mostly make quilts and bags. I thought about trading it in for a nicer sewing machine. When I called the dealer, they told me that I should really try to learn how to use it because I would probably love it, so I am signed up to take a class next week. However, since then, we were talking about quilting at church last week and several people told me you shouldn't serge a quilt top. These are very experienced quilters. Now, I'm wondering if the dealer was just trying to sell me classes to make more money and not have to deal with trading it in. I really don't know that many quilters, except those few women at church.

    #2
    Re: sergers

    I've never heard of serging on a quilt before either. You use a serger, I believe, for finishing a seam much nicer or for more reinforcement. Such as on a garment (look at your t'shirts and they have more than just a regular sewing stitch on them). Or they use sergers I believe on such things as pillowcases.
    I don't think that the quilt shop is trying to 'get your money for classes' - they are probably thinking that once you get into the hobby of quilting more, that perhaps you will be making things like bags and possibly clothing items that you could use a serger on and then you wouldn't have one to use if you traded it in.
    I personally am not into making clothes and have never have had the need for a serger. I do know though that there are lots of quilters out there that have one and love it. I'm sure they'll chime in here to tell you what they use theirs for.
    Hugs,
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/quiltsbytrish
    http://quiltdreaming.blogspot.com
    http://pinterest.com/TrishLapp


    What if you woke up today and the only things you had were the things you thanked God for yesterday? :icon_hug:quilting trish

    Comment


      #3
      Re: sergers

      I have a serger - actually bought one years ago that was a waste of money . . . before they were truly perfected. I can't even give that one away.

      At the quilt expo this past fall I succumbed and bought a Huskylock s25 probably more because my daughter kept saying she'd like to use one and I knew she couldn't afford it. I have used it twice since the end of September and tell myself every day that I need to make sure it is threaded correctly and USE IT.

      I, too, have wondered if there would be a use for it in quilting . . . my main objection, I think, would be that it cuts the edges and could result in throwing your pattern out of whack. Another would be it would use about two or three times more thread than necessary and wouldn't allow you to open up the seams to press flat. I don't really think it would be practical unless doing something like a strip quilt.

      Other comments and viewpoints?
      Sometimes, when there's a raging fire,
      it's best not to try to put it out with gasoline.

      "...pal carajo con la negatividad..."

      Comment


        #4
        Re: sergers

        I can promise I'm not going to make clothes. I do make bags, but I think you would have to go back and forth between the serger and the sewing machine too much. There is a lot you can't to on a serger with bags. I've been sewing since I was a child. I"ve made lots of clothes in my life, when I've had to, and I always hate it. Part of it is that my mom was a professional seamstress and was a perfectionist. She made me take out seams if they weren't absolutely perfect, even if it wasn't going to make a difference in how the clothing fit or looked. It left a bad taste in my mouth. I just started quilting and making bags, so I don' t have that negative stigma about those. I occasionally make ties for my boys, but you couldn't use a serger for those either.

        Comment


          #5
          Re: sergers

          If you plan on keeping the serger, it would be best to take classes. However Trish is right, you would use it more often for clothes, and pillowcases and things of that order. The serger has a knife built in that cuts your excess seam allowance right next to the seam you are sewing so that when you are done all you have is a sewn seam with no excess material showing.
          If you did that on a quilt and made a mistake you would be cutting part of your quilt. So classes are in order so they can teach you how to put that blade up out of the way. If you are only into quilting it may be wise to use it towards another sewing machine if you are in the market for one. I have a serger and didn't use it often and so it sat and as with other things "out sight, out of mind" I almost forgot I had one. When I went to sell it, I couldn't. Because it hadn't been used in so long it locked up and I couldn't use it anyway. And it was now useless. It would probably be best to sell it to someone who sews a lot of clothing and really would use it. If you're in the market for a new sewing machine use it as a trade in. That is my opinion, I'm sure people who use them would say learn to use it. Just depends on what you want to sew. Hugs, Jan
          Home, where each lives for the others and all live for God! ><(((((o>

          Comment


            #6
            Re: sergers

            I saw this in a newsletter I get from the shop where I bought my sewing machine. I hadn't ever thought about making a quilt on a serger but maybe this will help you. It's a video by Nancy Zieman-so you know she has experience.

            http://cl.publicaster.com/ClickThru....QuSp1A&sysid=1

            I didn't watch the video all the way thru but it looks like she did some of the quilt with the serger.
            Shelia

            Comment


              #7
              Re: sergers

              Originally posted by Texsam View Post
              I saw this in a newsletter I get from the shop where I bought my sewing machine. I hadn't ever thought about making a quilt on a serger but maybe this will help you. It's a video by Nancy Zieman-so you know she has experience.
              Thanks so much for finding this. It sure gives me a lot of ideas - I really wish I had watched this before I started my current lap quilt.
              Sometimes, when there's a raging fire,
              it's best not to try to put it out with gasoline.

              "...pal carajo con la negatividad..."

              Comment


                #8
                Re: sergers

                I don't have a serger but have heard of quilters using one for piecing. Funny thing is I just saw a video on Eleanor Burns' site yesterday where she was using a serger to piece blocks. I believe I have also seen Nancy Zieman doing the same thing. I like the idea of using a serger as the raveling of fabric drives me so crazy I use pinking blades and pinking shears. A serger would eliminate this issue. On the other hand, I have, on occasion (LOL), been known to have to rip a stich or two and a serged seam might be more work to rip. Don't know, just a thought.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: sergers

                  Originally posted by Lori View Post
                  On the other hand, I have, on occasion (LOL), been known to have to rip a stich or two and a serged seam might be more work to rip. Don't know, just a thought.
                  Depending on the serger you use, ripping seams may, in fact, be much easier. Some use a stitch that is similar to the old sewn bags of rice/sugar, etc. Find the right end and just pull.
                  Sometimes, when there's a raging fire,
                  it's best not to try to put it out with gasoline.

                  "...pal carajo con la negatividad..."

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: sergers

                    there are some patterns out there that you can make with a serger. Google"quilts made with a serger". Some of the ones I've seen have you sew all three layers at once in a quilt as you go type method.
                    HTML Code:
                    http://www.ehow.com/how_6825079_instructions-serger-quilting
                    Haven't tried it myself.


                    I have had one for years, used to use it a lot when I was sewing for my kids. I haven't even had it out of the case in maybe 7-8 years.
                    “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

                    ― Albert Pine

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: sergers

                      I have a Babylock Imagine. I like it. I sew things other than quilts, including some clothes. The gals at the shop told me that they use it for piecing quilts that they know will get a lot of wear. For the most part, you press your seams all to one side anyway. I have used it to construct quilts that have different fabric types mixed together. The swap blocks are often put together with my serger. I use it to make bags and there is some switching from the serger to the machine, but I think the extra strength in the seams is actually worth the switch. Of course my machines are right next to each other, so I only have to swivel the chair, and not hike across the room.
                      I have used it to attach the binding to a quilt before I hand stitch it down. The binding lies more flat when you wrap it around. It is harder to do corners and curves with a serger. You can get some really fun effects with stretch fabrics though. I like to make lettuce edges on my daughter's t-shirts with the rolled hem feature, and have a pattern for a ballerina quilt in my head that would have t-shirt knit tutus.
                      I have some silk that I will eventually make a quilt from, and you had better believe that I will use the serger on that stuff! You can adjust the needle size just like your regular sewing machine to sew any weight of fabric. The blade can be locked down to eliminate the trimming feature.
                      Removing a seam isn't any harder with the serger than the regular machine. Actually, I find it easier to find the stitches with the serger in some cases.
                      I would take the classes and see what you can learn. You might find that you can do more than you thought with it. I did.
                      If it doesn't work for you, I'd certainly trade it in on a machine you WILL use.
                      Best of luck!
                      Cathy
                      Be who you are and say what you feel
                      because those who mind don't matter,
                      and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

                      http://www.toggpine.wordpress.com

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: sergers

                        Thanks everyone. I am taking a class on Wednesday. I figure I will see what it can do then see how often I really use it. I can see where it will be helpful with sewing bags, but the switching back and forth could be a problem for me. I don't have a designated sewing area. I sew a my kitchen table and there isn't enough room to have a serger and a sewing machine out, so it would mean taking one down and putting the other one up. It may mean that I just do as much on the serger as I can, then put it away and do the rest with the machine. If it turns out I don't use it as much, then I'll trade it in. The sewing machine I have is one that I really love, but it isn't really mine. It is my daughters, who will graduate from high school this year. She will be taking it with her when she moved out and I will be left with my 23 year old sewing machine. It works great, but I've gotten used to all the bells and whistles on my daughters (especially the needle threader-darn these 41 year old eyes). This is the biggest reason I'm considering trading the serger in.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: sergers

                          How did your class go? Did you decide to keep the serger or go ahead and trade it in. I'm sure if you're going to be without the newer sewing machine in a few months it will be a tough decision.

                          I received a serger for Christmas and am thoroughly enjoying learning about it. I have dozens of ideas of how I'd like to use it.
                          Nancy

                          Psalm 126:3 The LORD has done great things for us, and we are filled with joy.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: sergers

                            I've decided to keep it. The class just taught me the basics, but it taught me enough that I've been able to play with it more and see what it can do. It can do up to 8 threads although I haven't done that many yet, just played with the 3 and 4 thread settings. I haven't pieced a quilt top yet, but I'm planning on trying one soon. I did decide to try out making a skirt for me and some shorts for my son. The serger made them so easy to make but they were fairly simple. I've also made some bags with the serger. I need a lot more practice at curves on the serger. The deciding factor for keeping it was that they were only going to give me $200 for a trade in. The machine cost a little over $2000 and it had only been used 2 times. My mother in law bought it there, so they were going to make a big profit on it twice. No way was I going to give it to them for that cost. I have a little more time to save up for a machine though. My daughter has decided to go to college close to home and live at home for now to save some money. She is very frugal and doesn't want to graduate from college with a huge debt. I'm going to start selling bags on Etsy and put everything I get from the bags into my sewing machine fund. I want to get a Babylock Melody.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: sergers

                              If they weren't going to make any better offer than that, I can see it was a good decision to keep it. And you now have some time to save for a machine. It should come in handy with making those bags for Etsy.

                              My daughter also went to college close to home, and lived at home to save on expenses.

                              Nancy
                              Nancy

                              Psalm 126:3 The LORD has done great things for us, and we are filled with joy.

                              Comment

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