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    The actual quilting of the quilt.

    The binding I was concerned about, actually looks easy, I hope. The part I don't know anything about is the quilting. Where do I start to learn that? I haven't seen any MSQC tutorial on that. Except the quilt as you go. Should I try that on a table runner?

    #2
    Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

    Are you hand or machine quilting?
    Lin

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      #3
      Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

      I guess machine. I would love to hand quilt. I have tried before it didn't go to well. Trying to learn alone. So for now, machine quilting. I did quilt the two baby quilts that I did. It was just squares sewn together. I just followed the line of squares and went up and down and across. It puckered horribly.

      The machine I have is just the lowest cost (I think) Brother that walmart carried a couple years back.
      It's the VX-1120

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        #4
        Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

        I'm in the same situation! I am just thinking of either doing 2in lines or maybe the stitch in the ditch....can't wait to hear what other people say as to how to do it. A little nerve wrecking!!

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          #5
          Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

          Lay your backing out totally smooth.
          Then your batting - totally smooth.
          Then your top - totally smooth. Your backing and batting should be about 2" or more larger than your top on all sides.
          You should either baste with thread to keep the layers together or pin about every fist apart - going up and down and across. Start in the middle and smooth it as you go. That should keep it from puckering. You should also start your quilting in the middle and work your way to the outside. That helps too.
          Don't take your basting stitches out until you are done quilting it. If you are using safety pins - they have bent ones that are easier to pin and unpin (and don't get really cheap ones like 2 packs for $1. - ask me how I know!) - take your pins out as you get closer to them. I do try to look at my top to see where I might machine quilt and try to not put pins right there where my quilting will be going.

          They also say to let your batting sit out loose for a few hours if it's all wadded up from being in the package. And make sure your backing and top are pressed.
          Remember, when you are pressing - you aren't pushing on the iron hard. That can stretch the material. Just easy and preferably up and down.

          Hope this helps!

          Hugs,
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/quiltsbytrish
          http://quiltdreaming.blogspot.com
          http://pinterest.com/TrishLapp


          What if you woke up today and the only things you had were the things you thanked God for yesterday? :icon_hug:quilting trish

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            #6
            Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

            Thanks, So what have some of you done on quilting a D9 table runner. Have you quilted in a design ( not sure I can even do that on my machine) I don't know how to lower feed dogs. Sorry if my terms are not correct. Thats a lot of little square and rectangles to go around.

            When I cut my borders, does it matter if I cut from the side where I trimmed off the salvage or should I cut them from the ends?

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              #7
              Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

              I'm having the same issue.
              I'm going to make a mini square. Kind of a giant 4 patch or 9 patch and then layer it etc and then practice quilting it to get a feel for it. Before I start on my actual quilt.

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                #8
                Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                Misty do you have a "walking foot" attachment for your machine? I could not believe how much easier and better looking my straight line quilting got once I used one of those. You don't lower the feed dogs with one. It is like having top and bottom feed dogs to pull your layers through evenly.
                If you want to try free motioning quilting you would use the darning foot and lower the feed dogs. That takes alot of practice. I am still not very good but with each quilt I get alittle better!
                Good luck!
                Patti
                "Like" me on Facebook @ Sweet Cherry Quilting to help spread the love of all things crafty and quilted!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                  This lady does straight line quilting....dont know if thats what you had in mind....I've yet to try it!!! I'm almost done with my first quilt top.
                  http://tallgrassprairiestudio.blogsp...-and-tips.html
                  http://www.ideas-for-quilting.com/ea...equilting.html

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                    I'm a VERY new quilter (less then 4 months), but I've punched off about 6 quilts of varying sizes already. I'm sort of obsessed once I start one.....which is why they get done so fast (staying up until 6am also helps with 'total focused quilting time'....lol).

                    Yes, a proper basting of the 3 layers will help with the puckering. Her is my experience in a nutshell.

                    1st quilt - pinned with cheap pins (purchase the curved ones as a previous poster mentioned!!!!) - and I got lots of puckers on the back only, but in the end, it looks sort of nice. I 'stitched in the ditch' on all the horizontal lines only....turned out nice in the end.

                    2nd quilt - NO measuring (prior to all my new quilting tools)......total mess, but LOVE the quilt. I practiced with my 'fancy stitches' and did some random designes with my machine, but not free motion quilting at that point. I ended up getting super creative and was able to cover all my major mistakes, so the quilt looks really nice - also only pinned - but used the curved pins - and LOTS of them, was much easier.

                    3rd quilt - tried basting spray and LOVE it! I used the spray AND pins, but the quilt held together totally with NO shifting and NO puckering AT ALL. I still did stitch in the ditch for this one too, but had to get it done fast for my daughter.

                    All 3 quilts above were for 'double size beds'.

                    4th quilt - queen size - tried LOTS Of new things. I used basting spray and pins, and tried my hand at free motion. Squiggles mainly just to get the hang of it, and although I can see my mistakes and faults, I needed to learn somewhere. Much of the rest of the quilt is in the ditch. This was the first quilt I did a proper binding for too...all others were done with the backing wrapping around the sides and ironed then folded over to make a nice edge.

                    5th quilt (lap quilt) - basting spray ONLY and free motion quilting all over. I got it done in a day!!!! With a little practice, it goes a long way!

                    6th quilt (lap quilt for grandma) - very little basting spray and needed a couple of pins - free motion all over again. No fancy designs yet - still just squiggles and stipple quilting for design, but my best one for the time.

                    7th quilt (my lap quilt) - best yet. Tons of patchwork designs and color co-ordinating, and then free motion all over - only 2 small mistakes!

                    8th quilt - a 'quilt as you go' and I HATE this technique. Maybe because I'm new to it all still, but I found it to be so darn difficult to align and get straight and flat, although all the practice for free motion quilting designs on all the smaller squares was worth the trouble in the end - I'm now starting on designs.....

                    9th quilt - a duvet cover for my king sized bed.......I will NOT attempt to quilt this size. So a duvet cover it is....but I don't know how to finish it (do I enforce the backing or leave it?).

                    Anyway, as you can see, I've evolved over the last few months and with practice, you'll get it. My quilts really do get better as I do them, and with the extra practice it is very worth it - very rewarding!

                    Chrina2

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                      Wow - you have really been busy! I totally agree with you - we get much better with practice. I remember making a million (well it seemed like it) potholders when I was working on binding. The first ones were pretty iffy, but by the end I had it pretty much figured out. Now if only my memory could remember all of the "right" ways!!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                        I struggled with basting on my first couple of quilts. I was using safety pins but was having problems because they only space I had to lay it out was on the living room floor and I kept pinning it to the carpet!

                        When I was layering the double quilt I made out of silk, I took it to my LQS because I was really worried about doing it. The lady there showed me how to layer up over a table (much easier on your back) and sold me a microstitch gun for basting. It shoots out little plastic tags, like the ones you find on clothes tags but shorter. It's really quick and easy to use and keeps the quilt really well basted.
                        Quilting through the dull times
                        northstarquilting.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                          Chrina, what a lot you've accomplished in 4 months!! Good for you!

                          Now, take some pictures of you work, girlfriend... we'd love to see it.
                          There's still time to change the road you're on - Led Zeppelin, "Stairway to Heaven"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                            Misty, I have just started doing FQM in the last month or so, I have NO depth perception, yet I have taught my self how to. I am using small dog coats my DW and I are making to teach my self. I would suggest you start with a small item then work up to a quilt. I took this advice and it is working for me.

                            Good luck
                            Chris
                            <a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y64/RagamuffinsCottage/signature_1.gif" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: The actual quilting of the quilt.

                              Originally posted by chrina2 View Post
                              I'm a VERY new quilter (less then 4 months), but I've punched off about 6 quilts of varying sizes already. I'm sort of obsessed once I start one.....which is why they get done so fast (staying up until 6am also helps with 'total focused quilting time'....lol).

                              Yes, a proper basting of the 3 layers will help with the puckering. Her is my experience in a nutshell.

                              1st quilt - pinned with cheap pins (purchase the curved ones as a previous poster mentioned!!!!) - and I got lots of puckers on the back only, but in the end, it looks sort of nice. I 'stitched in the ditch' on all the horizontal lines only....turned out nice in the end.

                              2nd quilt - NO measuring (prior to all my new quilting tools)......total mess, but LOVE the quilt. I practiced with my 'fancy stitches' and did some random designes with my machine, but not free motion quilting at that point. I ended up getting super creative and was able to cover all my major mistakes, so the quilt looks really nice - also only pinned - but used the curved pins - and LOTS of them, was much easier.

                              3rd quilt - tried basting spray and LOVE it! I used the spray AND pins, but the quilt held together totally with NO shifting and NO puckering AT ALL. I still did stitch in the ditch for this one too, but had to get it done fast for my daughter.

                              All 3 quilts above were for 'double size beds'.

                              4th quilt - queen size - tried LOTS Of new things. I used basting spray and pins, and tried my hand at free motion. Squiggles mainly just to get the hang of it, and although I can see my mistakes and faults, I needed to learn somewhere. Much of the rest of the quilt is in the ditch. This was the first quilt I did a proper binding for too...all others were done with the backing wrapping around the sides and ironed then folded over to make a nice edge.

                              5th quilt (lap quilt) - basting spray ONLY and free motion quilting all over. I got it done in a day!!!! With a little practice, it goes a long way!

                              6th quilt (lap quilt for grandma) - very little basting spray and needed a couple of pins - free motion all over again. No fancy designs yet - still just squiggles and stipple quilting for design, but my best one for the time.

                              7th quilt (my lap quilt) - best yet. Tons of patchwork designs and color co-ordinating, and then free motion all over - only 2 small mistakes!

                              8th quilt - a 'quilt as you go' and I HATE this technique. Maybe because I'm new to it all still, but I found it to be so darn difficult to align and get straight and flat, although all the practice for free motion quilting designs on all the smaller squares was worth the trouble in the end - I'm now starting on designs.....

                              9th quilt - a duvet cover for my king sized bed.......I will NOT attempt to quilt this size. So a duvet cover it is....but I don't know how to finish it (do I enforce the backing or leave it?).

                              Anyway, as you can see, I've evolved over the last few months and with practice, you'll get it. My quilts really do get better as I do them, and with the extra practice it is very worth it - very rewarding!

                              Chrina2
                              will you pass some of that energy to me. maybe I would get more done
                              Patrice

                              Comment

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