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    Border quilting

    Has anyone ever made a quilt panel but quilted just the borders?

    #2
    I haven't but thought about it. I'll add that my MIL made lot's of full size 'summer' quilts with no batting or quilting and they all were loved and washed forever. I'm only mentioning that because you'll get those I don't think you should do that answers. 🙃
    🌺 Lorie

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      #3
      Hulamoon, Thanks for that. I'm asking because I've made a panel for my granddaughter's birthday. Other than stitch in the ditch, and straight and wavy lines on table runners, I've never quilted anything larger. I'm afraid I'll ruin the panel if I try to quilt it.

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        #4
        Nope. I've made many panel quilts to which I've added a border of some sort. I've always quilted the entire quilt. If you don't feel expert enough to quilt it, you could always tie it.

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          #5
          JCY, that's a great suggestion! I have ties a couple small quilts, but I don't think it would work with this panel. The panel is of 2 wolves with mountains and trees below and in the background. The rectangular panel with 2 borders measures 51w x 38h.

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            #6
            You could do grid quilting on the panel. I like to use wavy lines for grid quilting. When I try straight lines, it's really hard to make them straight without any "oops" movements. I have done several panel quilts this way. Some people like to outline the main subjects, in your case, the wolves. I use a neutral thread color that does not detract from the panel.

            Good luck whichever way you go.

            Oh, just a thought, you could also do a tacking stitch over the panel. But that's a lot of stopping and starting and hiding the thread ends.
            Vonnie

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              #7
              To add what Vonnie suggested, you can do the grid far apart depending. Battings have a width suggestion on the pkg.
              https://www.generations-quilt-patter...distances.html
              🌺 Lorie

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                #8
                More often than not, traditional all-over design quilting will "ruin" a panel's design. I stitch the outlines of the designs in the panels. This is for all designs- landscape, wildlife, and baby styles. I run a topstitch 1/4" inside the border to panel joint to define the panel. Then quilt the borders in an appropriate pattern. I do this also on pieced panels- sometimes called medallions.
                You gots to risk it to gets the biscuit-

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                • misstrixella
                  misstrixella commented
                  Editing a comment
                  oldmanquilts, that's exactly what I'm concerned about...ruining the panel itself with quilting. I think, at least in this case, I'll try thhe topstitching, then quilting the borders.

                #9
                I would think it would just depend. I did the grands a panel and quilted just like sid because I figure they may drag it around and do much better with it well quilted

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                • misstrixella
                  misstrixella commented
                  Editing a comment
                  tsladaritz, I see your point. In this case, thought, the quilted panel will be on the wall.

                #10
                If you do decide to quilt, use a thinner needle. Panels are only printed on one side and sometimes the color of the backs of the panels (usually white) will poke thru to the front. I haven't made many panel quilts but, when I do, I quilt over them.
                "You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                • misstrixella
                  misstrixella commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Teen, Thanks for the thinner needle tip!

                #11
                Outlining the panel's design will not really suffer if you're not exactly on the "line" in all places. Use the right color thread in a thin gauge and it won't even show in the finish. You could use a clear poly as well to hide the thread showing. If you can stitch following a straight line, you can follow the curves. If you can't...well. I adjust the presser foot presser about half normal- just enough to feed the fabric, but allow some movement of the fabric without raising the presser foot.
                You gots to risk it to gets the biscuit-

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