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    squaring a hexagon

    I have a quilt top all pieced except for the "corners". I need some instruction as to how to accomplish this "squaring". I didn't find out until after my piecing was done that I should have worked the top in "rows" instead of around the center hex....I have 11 "rounds" done. I hate the idea of dismantling all that I have accomplished....I hand pieced all that I have done.
    Any help will be truly appreciated....thanks, moronquilter

    #2
    Re: squaring a hexagon

    Moronquilter, I LOVE your name LOL :-). That's how I feel MUCH of the time.

    Sadly I can't answer your question, but I'm sure someone here will be able to help, they're a great group.
    There's still time to change the road you're on - Led Zeppelin, "Stairway to Heaven"

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      #3
      Re: squaring a hexagon

      I so can not call you Moronquilter, especially since no such thing exists. There are varying levels of expertise and some of the best and most innovative ideas have come form people who had never been told how it 'should' be done.

      That aside, you have several options for dealing with this case but it would be helpful to know firstly, is the quilt 'out of square' by very much and secondly are you simply looking for methods of 'finishing' the edges. A photo may be helpful as well.

      If the quilt is out of shape you could try blocking it, this involves dampening the fabric and then pinning it out on the floor etc, in the shape you want and letting it dry. This is not as easy with pieced work and I have never done it with hexagons but I don't see why it is not worth a try.

      There are several ways to finish the quilt to 'square it up', mostly by inserting half hexagons or by cutting back that last row and binding or applying a border then trimming excess hexagon material. One that I like is to literally applique the pieced hexagons onto another wholecloth top. This automatically gives you borders without 'piecing' them on, it stabilises the hexagons and continues the hand pieced quality of the quilt. Simply lay the fabric down, lay the pieced hexagons on top, making sure the position is equal all round, pin in place and applique down. I would start the stitching in the middle and work my way out to the edges making sure you are not distorting the quilt. You do not need to stitch all of it, just in enough places to keep it secure and stable, then stitch the entire outer edge so there are no gaps that can snag on anything. This is how the old yoyo/suffolk puff quilts were done and it works well for hexagons as well.

      I hope that is helpful and please let me know if it doesn't make sense.
      Last edited by Dragonfly; December 29, 2010, 03:36 PM.
      Lynn

      "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass....it's about learning to dance in the rain" Anonymous.

      Comment


        #4
        Re: squaring a hexagon

        Dragonfly

        Thanks for the suggestion......I think that I will be able to applique my hexes onto what might end up being the front edges instead of the back of the quilt.

        But .....

        What I really meant by "squaring" is how to make my large "circle" of hexes into a square...hence my original query of "how do I square off" that is literally "how do I make the corners so that the hex becomes a square" I don't know if that makes any more sense than my original question. I also am a novice at using the computer so I don't know if I can post a picture of what I have done, and what I want to know how to do.

        moronquilter

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          #5
          Re: squaring a hexagon

          Ah yes, that makes sense, now I see what you mean, have you searched on the internet for pattern suggestions? I would need to have an idea of what you have done so far to make suggestions. But what you need to do is make a heap more hexagons and simply start building out into the corners, each row as you work out should have one less hexagon on each end of the row which will bring you to a point at the corner, does this make sense. So instead of going around your centre start working into each corner. There would be lots of design option with this, since you are effectively making a triangle you could use bands of colour or chevrons of colour, it would depend on what design you already have done.
          Lynn

          "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass....it's about learning to dance in the rain" Anonymous.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: squaring a hexagon

            Ok Mquilter, if you go to google and put in hexagon quilt designs and select Images from up the top of the page or from the list you will get, there are a multitude of very lovely photos from which you may get some inspiration. Alternatively, or as well, I have included some links to some sites I found that may be helpful.

            http://www.womenfolk.com/quilt_patte...ory/mosaic.htm
            This next one has a free downloadable design book, but note the picture in the top left corner of the page, this shows how they worked the corners after a centre medallion.
            http://www.lindafranz.com/shop/hexag...design-book/84
            This one isn't squaring off but shows how they have built on a centre design.
            http://www.quiltville.com/hexagons.shtml

            I hope there is something there that will help.

            If you have problems getting to images try this link.
            http://www.google.com.au/images?hl=e...ed=0CDIQsAQwAQ
            Lynn

            "Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass....it's about learning to dance in the rain" Anonymous.

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