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    Newbie Question

    Okay, so what is bias or bias binding or binding biased, or is it biased. and why/what are you biased about when you quilt?! Your fabric colours or something?! *snort* Anyways, if this is something I'm supposed to be doing when I quilt, well then ... OOPS!

    *HUGS* and Alohas, Bridgette

    "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." ~Unknown

    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW--What a Ride!" - Unknown

    Blog
    http://hapamomquilts.blogspot.com

    #2
    Re: Newbie Question

    Anything called bias means that it's cut at an angle rather than straight acorss the width or straight down the fabric. It's usually when you cut fabric so the grain goes at 45 degrees (have you seen the new tutorial on your tube - that's probably the best way to understand it).

    When you cut fabric at an angle it is stretchier and moves differently so drapy clothes are generally cut on the bias.

    You can get different effects - your stripes become diagonals - which can make really cute bindings.
    Quilting through the dull times
    northstarquilting.blogspot.com

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Newbie Question

      Alot of quilters insist that if you don't cut your binding on the bias, then your quilt won't hold up. I for one have never cut binding on the bias. (Oh, do you hear the sirens???)

      I think it's becoming more acceptable not to, as Moda promotes using jelly roles for binding.

      I can't get the tool now, but I will in the future just to see the difference it makes. (Stupid empty pockets.)

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Newbie Question

        I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

        I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.
        Quilting through the dull times
        northstarquilting.blogspot.com

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Newbie Question

          Originally posted by jrchapman View Post
          I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

          I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.
          What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)
          Home, where each lives for the others and all live for God! ><(((((o>

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Newbie Question

            Originally posted by jrchapman View Post
            I know that bias bindings are very good for curves so if you have a scalloped edge or you're doing round placemats I would cut on the bias.

            I generally do a double binding which I believe is stronger anyway so I can't be faffed with bias strips.
            I do double as well. I am getting ready to do a scalloped edge quilt. I didn't even think about that! Maybe I should attempt to squeeze the piggy bank for today's deal!

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Newbie Question

              Originally posted by janluna View Post
              What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)
              I tried to find a video for this...never mind, all I found was how to tie people up!!

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Newbie Question

                Originally posted by janluna View Post
                What is a double binding? Forgive another newbie question? {:-)
                double binding is when you have two layers of fabric that fold over the edge of the quilt sandwich. A single binding only has one layer of fabric. Double bindings are, in my opinion, better on a quilt that will be used and washed a lot, since you have better coverage on the edge of the quilt. single layers are fine for wall hangings, etc. that don't get much use.

                double bindings start with one strip of fabric which is folded in half lengthwise before it's sewn onto the quilt.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Newbie Question

                  Originally posted by hillbilly View Post
                  I tried to find a video for this...never mind, all I found was how to tie people up!!
                  HA HA HA HA Wait til your husband sees your browsing history!!!
                  Quilting through the dull times
                  northstarquilting.blogspot.com

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Newbie Question

                    I compromise . . . use a bias binding on my quilts because they will be washed and have to hold up. I use a straight binding on wallhangings. I've always used a double binding . . . didn't even know it was acceptable to use a single!

                    LOL to hillbilly . . . hope you remember your Girl Scout knots!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Newbie Question

                      Originally posted by jrchapman View Post
                      Anything called bias means that it's cut at an angle rather than straight acorss the width or straight down the fabric. It's usually when you cut fabric so the grain goes at 45 degrees (have you seen the new tutorial on your tube - that's probably the best way to understand it).

                      When you cut fabric at an angle it is stretchier and moves differently so drapy clothes are generally cut on the bias.

                      You can get different effects - your stripes become diagonals - which can make really cute bindings.
                      Uhhhhhhhhh ... okay I still don't get it ... I hate being stupid! Going to go find that video, just hope it's one of Jenny's!
                      *HUGS* and Alohas, Bridgette

                      "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." ~Unknown

                      "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW--What a Ride!" - Unknown

                      Blog
                      http://hapamomquilts.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Newbie Question

                        Originally posted by hillbilly View Post
                        Alot of quilters insist that if you don't cut your binding on the bias, then your quilt won't hold up. I for one have never cut binding on the bias. (Oh, do you hear the sirens???)

                        I think it's becoming more acceptable not to, as Moda promotes using jelly roles for binding.

                        I can't get the tool now, but I will in the future just to see the difference it makes. (Stupid empty pockets.)
                        OH THANK GAWAD! Well, we'll see if mine hold up, if I EVER get one qulited!
                        *HUGS* and Alohas, Bridgette

                        "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." ~Unknown

                        "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW--What a Ride!" - Unknown

                        Blog
                        http://hapamomquilts.blogspot.com

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Newbie Question

                          Originally posted by ktbb View Post
                          double binding is when you have two layers of fabric that fold over the edge of the quilt sandwich. A single binding only has one layer of fabric. Double bindings are, in my opinion, better on a quilt that will be used and washed a lot, since you have better coverage on the edge of the quilt. single layers are fine for wall hangings, etc. that don't get much use.

                          double bindings start with one strip of fabric which is folded in half lengthwise before it's sewn onto the quilt.
                          Okay, I know what binding is, and since Jenny taught me, I've been doing it doubled.
                          *HUGS* and Alohas, Bridgette

                          "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." ~Unknown

                          "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW--What a Ride!" - Unknown

                          Blog
                          http://hapamomquilts.blogspot.com

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Newbie Question

                            Originally posted by RockyMountainHorseMama View Post
                            Uhhhhhhhhh ... okay I still don't get it ... I hate being stupid! Going to go find that video, just hope it's one of Jenny's!


                            Sorry
                            Last edited by Texsam; September 2, 2010, 09:52 PM. Reason: Be nice
                            Shelia

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Newbie Question

                              And you're not stupid.


                              I used that thick packaged binding on the first quilts I made. Man that stuff was hard to sew down and I had to do it all by hand because the machine I had at the time wouldn't sew it. I had some sore fingers after that.
                              Shelia

                              Comment

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