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Snowballing Tip

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    #16
    Re: Snowballing Tip

    Yep, I always do them the way you did! works well.

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      #17
      Re: Snowballing Tip

      Since my Bernina lets me shift the position of the needle, I always shift it to the right one step when sewing any kind of bias seam, especially when snowballing. That way I can just follow the line whether pressed or marked. The only drawback is to remember to shift it back to center before stitching straight seams afterwards.

      Another tip is to stitch again about half an inch to the outside of the main stitch line, then cut between the stitching. That gives you a small half-square triangle for every snowball corner. These make great borders and sashing, either as a sawtooth or pinwheels or hourglass blocks.
      Last edited by sottwell; December 18, 2018, 11:04 AM.

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        #18
        Re: Snowballing Tip

        Snowballing is not my favorite thing to do. I figured out on my own, that sewing on the line did not work for me. I sew ~1 needle width off the line. When making flying geese or snowballing, I have used Donna Jordan's tip of leaving the fabric in place to press before trimming off the triangle. That way you know for sure the corner is going to be square. Yes, this is an old tutorial, as you can tell by a younger Jenny & a different studio set-up & equipment. This tutorial was the first pattern I made after joining M*. I used FQs from my stash. In order to get a full 6.5" width on the 3 strips, I found I needed to sew a very scant 1/4".

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          #19
          Re: Snowballing Tip

          I also don't trim off the corners till I have pressed the corner back. I want to make sure I have enough.

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            #20
            Re: Snowballing Tip

            I have recently discovered that my laser beam on my BabyLock Destiny would make it SEW much easier. Oh My, love my LB.
            A day patched with quilting Seldom unravels Sharon

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