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  • Featherweight question

    We have a featherweight in our family with a treadle instead of a foot pedal. Is there any way to use the machine with a pedal instead? I've googled and can't find any answers. The machine isn't electic, so probably not. Thanks for any answers!

  • #2
    Re: Featherweight question

    To my knowledge Featherweights were always electric, never treadle. You could have a 201, 15-99 or 66, but i doubt it is a featherweight.

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    • #3
      Re: Featherweight question

      Sure it's a Featherweight? Maybe a homemade conversion? How 'bout a pic of the handwheel end at least.

      If the electrical parts (motors, belts, pedals, cords and plugs) are missing they are available.
      You gots to risk it to gets the biscuit-

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      • #4
        Re: Featherweight question

        There are plenty of treadle machines out there that were converted to electric. You might have to sift through a fair amount of Youtube videos and read lots of vintage machine blogs for info on how to do it, but it's possible. You'd need a Featherweight type motor that drives a belt then figure out how to fit a belt between the machine and the motor.

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        • #5
          Re: Featherweight question

          Maybe a 99, a smaller “3/4” size machine? Easy to convert to electric if it is.
          sigpicIf you can't see the mistake from the back of a galloping horse, nobody is going to notice it.

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          • #6
            Re: Featherweight question

            If you can find the serial number, look it up on ISMACS. http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...-database.html or here https://singer-featherweight.com/blo...weight-machine
            Serial numbers for Singer Featherweights are located on a raised boss on the underside of the machine. Lay your machine on its back and look on the left hand side of the main body (not the folding extension table).

            There is a group which only uses people power to sew (treadles), and they have lots of answers! http://www.treadleon.net/ Doesn't cost to join.
            “Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.” ― John Muir
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            • #7
              Re: Featherweight question

              Hi starlover
              would love to see a picture of this treadling setup,
              there used to be a switch thing that used the treadle set up with an additional motor to drive the belt,
              there is a picture in this blog post
              https://dragonpoodle.blogspot.com/20...c-treadle.html
              other wise its a featherweight motor needed to be bolted on and a pedal, belt,
              https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...eDesc=0&_oac=1
              depending on which pedal style you can still use the treadle pedal to press the electric pedal, specially if get an ache in ankle,
              hope these help
              T
              Last edited by 201 Treadler; January 12th, 2020, 04:19 PM.

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              • #8
                Re: Featherweight question

                Thank you for all your help! The machine is at my mom's house, so I'll get a picture later. I'm thrilled to know there is a way to change to a pedal.

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                • #9
                  Re: Featherweight question

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Here is a picture of one that looks just like my machine.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Featherweight question

                    Ah, I see, what you have there is a 66 (with Red Eye or Red Head decals). Many of these were electrified later on by adding a motor behind the pillar which is driven by a small belt. (Personally I would try treadling - once you get the hang of it you may like it! That's what happened to me, anyway. )

                    Click image for larger version

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                    Last edited by VintageGalAnnie; January 12th, 2020, 06:39 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Featherweight question

                      Hi Starlover
                      https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...ine+221&_oac=1
                      the belt goes into the same grove as the treadle belt on the wheel, you will need to check if the machine has a threaded hole on the pillar for the motor, it is the same one the handcranks bolt onto, some early sewing machines do not have a mounting point and may need, alternative mounting point thinking of.
                      perhaps a bracket making to mount the motor higher then the flywheel, using motor against the treadle belt, the pitman rod from pedal to flywheel, would need disconnecting in that set up. think more modern industrial machines have motors under the table
                      whatever you decide will be alright.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Featherweight question

                        Looks like a 66 to me too. One way to confirm and find out when it was manufactured, is to go to ISMACS http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...-database.html and enter the serial number which is on the bed of the machine on the right hand side. Small metal plate.
                        “Of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt.” ― John Muir
                        “We can be many things in this life, choose to be kind!” ― author unknown

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                        • #13
                          Re: Featherweight question

                          Originally posted by MHG Winnower View Post
                          Looks like a 66 to me too. One way to confirm and find out when it was manufactured, is to go to ISMACS http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_mach...-database.html and enter the serial number which is on the bed of the machine on the right hand side. Small metal plate.
                          Thanks for this site! Mine was apparently from 1910!
                          And thank you all for the advice on adding a motor, we'll get started on this soon. Looking forward to this project and being able to use the machine.

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