Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Machine lifespan

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Machine lifespan

    How long should I expect my modern sewing machine to last? I sew 2-3 hours per day.

    #2
    Re: Machine lifespan

    What's the machine you're sewing on? What fabrics (strictly quilting cottons, or thicker stuff, like denim) are you usually sewing? Are you mostly using a straight stitch, or also more elaborate stitches?

    Comment


      #3
      Re: Machine lifespan

      I have a Brother machine. Sew mostly quilting cottons with straight stitch. A plastic/rubber washer thing just broke and I can't plug in my foot pedal. The machine was about $1000 new 6 years ago. Worth paying to get fixed or get a new one??

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Machine lifespan

        Originally posted by NikiL View Post
        I have a Brother machine. Sew mostly quilting cottons with straight stitch. A plastic/rubber washer thing just broke and I can't plug in my foot pedal. The machine was about $1000 new 6 years ago. Worth paying to get fixed or get a new one??
        Do you invest to have the machine serviced regularly? If the answer is yes, then the answer is yes keep it. If you have never serviced the machine, it may be worth it to see if it is in need and while it is there fix the broken components.
        Blogging ahead.....research in quilting and sewing with a dab of cooking/recipes too.

        https://myquiltprojects.wordpress.com/

        https://thecookbookproject.wordpress.com/

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Machine lifespan

          It does get serviced regularly. Just didn't know if this was a "throw away" product like so many things these days! How much do repairs cost?

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Machine lifespan

            Six years ago when your new Brother was $1000 it was a mid range machine and is probably worth repairing. The older mid range Brothers (six years is old) were very sturdy. The new Brothers (less than four years old) under $400 are throw away machines IMHO.

            You should be able to get a repair estimate from a reputable shop for free. Please be aware that the good shops have a long waiting list and it may be weeks before they can get to your repair. It is not that the repair itself takes a long time, just there is a line ahead of you.

            If it can be repaired for under $80 go for it. If the repair is more than $200 I would be looking for another machine.
            Stash Treasure Acquisitions Beyond Life Expectancy. My stash keeps me STABLE, oh yeah.... and dark chocolate.

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Machine lifespan

              I would not consider that a throw away machine. Take it to an authorized Brother repairman though to have it serviced and repaired. My guy charges $150 just to look at it, to clean and for general service. Parts that may need to be replaced are extra.
              Blankets wrap you in warmth, quilts wrap you in love

              Marilyn......
              sigpic

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Machine lifespan

                Throw away machines.

                Sad

                SMH......
                Donna

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Machine lifespan

                  Originally posted by dwil23 View Post
                  Throw away machines.

                  Sad

                  SMH......
                  IMHO there is a place in every quilters life journey for a throw away machine. I started on a $120 Brother machine that I bought at a big box store. I made every newbie mistake you can make. Installing the bobbin upside down, breaking needles, you name it. I learned something important about machine maintenance for every mistake I made. Two years later when I made the final mistake that broke it so bad I had to bring it in for repairs I learned that they wanted $180 to repair a machine I had purchased two years ago for $120. Nope, bought a better Brother for $200. Wore the plastic gears out in four years but never had to have it serviced once in four years. If it costs $150 dollars a year to clean and service a machine, there is definitely a place for throw away machines while you are learning.
                  Stash Treasure Acquisitions Beyond Life Expectancy. My stash keeps me STABLE, oh yeah.... and dark chocolate.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Machine lifespan

                    Thanks for all the suggestions!!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Machine lifespan

                      Originally posted by DeniseSm View Post
                      IMHO there is a place in every quilters life journey for a throw away machine. I started on a $120 Brother machine that I bought at a big box store. I made every newbie mistake you can make. Installing the bobbin upside down, breaking needles, you name it. I learned something important about machine maintenance for every mistake I made. Two years later when I made the final mistake that broke it so bad I had to bring it in for repairs I learned that they wanted $180 to repair a machine I had purchased two years ago for $120. Nope, bought a better Brother for $200. Wore the plastic gears out in four years but never had to have it serviced once in four years. If it costs $150 dollars a year to clean and service a machine, there is definitely a place for throw away machines while you are learning.

                      Sorry, not at all what I was saying. I am totally disgusted by throw away everything. We claim to be worried about the environment, but yet pitch tons and tons of plastic machines of every kind into landfills every year. I bought a Canon printer with refillable ink cartridges. Guess what? The lifespan of the printer is designed to be less than the time it would take to use the ink in the cartridges. Just throw it away and buy another one.

                      As for sewing machines - all metal machines made in the late 1800's and all the way into the 1950's that have not been left outside to rust, are still usable and serviceable. If it could be done then, it could be done now. That is my point. But, as long as they can convince us consumers that we need to replace our plastic machines with new plastic machines and toss the old ones into a landfill, then they will continue to keep us spending big bucks on the plastic. I will keep my money and my vintage machines, thank you.
                      Donna

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: Machine lifespan

                        The sewing machine store near me will sell you extended warranties on machines. I'm sure most stores do. When I bought my class machine, which I paid $300 for several years ago, I bought that warranty which cost $100 and was good for four years. It covered repairs and cleanings for those four years and I could take in to be cleaned whenever I wanted.

                        The cost for taking it in for maintenance/cleaning was $150, so it was well worth it.
                        pat.

                        No rain....no rainbows!


                        sigpic

                        If you can't be nice.....BE QUIET!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Re: Machine lifespan

                          Sewing machines can last a long time or a really short time. I have found that regular maintenance and cleaning make them last. Learn how to clean areas such as bobbin case, any open crevices that might accumulate fibers. Oil, if you machine requires this. Check your manual.

                          My DD has had a Husquarvana 400 for over 25 years, used extensively by both of us and I used daily when I had a sewing business. Cleaned it myself regularly and brought it in for service. In this time, it's probably been serviced 5 times and runs like a charm. I have had my Husky for over 8 years and it's only been serviced once for a recall item. I clean it myself, using pipe cleaners, brushes and small thingy item sold by various LQS and use a mini vaccum. Never use canned air in electronic machines.

                          I have a 1925 Singer which works like a charm. I oil, clean and maintain myself. On mechanical machines, you can use canned air I expect this one to work for a long time.

                          Enjoy life and do what makes you happy. Everything else will follow.

                          Every day I try to do one thing that challenges my comfort zone.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Re: Machine lifespan

                            I'm a big proponent of repair, too, specially if it means that machine won't be thrown away.

                            But people aren't literally throwing away machines (like taking them to the dump) , are they? I mean, they'd see about giving them to a repair place, for parts, at least, yes?

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Re: Machine lifespan

                              Originally posted by Thayer Abaigael View Post
                              I'm a big proponent of repair, too, specially if it means that machine won't be thrown away.

                              But people aren't literally throwing away machines (like taking them to the dump) , are they? I mean, they'd see about giving them to a repair place, for parts, at least, yes?
                              Unfortunately, we live in a throw away society, so sadly many do end up in landfills. I personally would not spend $150 to repair a machine that only cost $200 to begin with. If everyone with broken machines, turned them in to repair shops to 'recylce', they would be overflowing with broken, unusable machines.
                              Blankets wrap you in warmth, quilts wrap you in love

                              Marilyn......
                              sigpic

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X