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  • Nylon Thread

    I have acquired a box of pre-wound bobbins that are filled with nylon thread. Have any of you used nylon thread to quilt with? If you have, how did you like it? Does anyone recommend using it? All I've been able to find out about nylon thread is that it can melt, but surely that wouldn't happen with ordinary ironing or drying in a clothes dryer.

  • #2
    Re: Nylon Thread

    That is a tough one. Do you have any idea how old the thread is? My MIL was quite a good machine quilter, taught classes, belonged to several guilds and had her own quilt shop. She made us many quilts in tge 70's and 80's and quilted them with what she called "invisible thread." To me it kind of looked like fishing line, sort of blueish on the spool but invisible if you cut a piece off. Those quilts are now disintegrating along the quilting lines as though the thread eventually cut through the fabric, and beyond repair. She was very knowledgeable about quilting and would not have used it had she known her quilts would not hold up over time. I can only guess that that kind of thread was popular at the time. I washed the quilts many times and never noticed any melting but never needed to iron them so I can't speak to that. Betty died about 10 years ago so I never asked her if the thread she used was nylon or something else. I had just gotten back into quilting when she passed and I did take all of her cotton quilting thread but threw the invisible thread out without thinking to look at the label first or keep a spool to look it up later. Maybe someone else will have more up to date info for you. But because I can see the results of using this many years later I would not want to use any kind of invisible thread myself.

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    • #3
      Re: Nylon Thread

      I have heard that nylon thread will stretch if it is in the bottom portion of the stitch and will cause problems. Make a small quilt sandwich and see if it can be successful.
      Blogging ahead.....research in quilting and sewing with a dab of cooking/recipes too.

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      • #4
        Re: Nylon Thread

        JJKaiser, there's nothing on the box that indicates how old the thread is.

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        • #5
          Re: Nylon Thread

          I don't have any experience with nylon thread but some research indicates it is mainly used in heavy duty applications such as auto interiors, etc.

          This site has as much info as I've seen published- https://www.thethreadexchange.com/mi...ad-Information

          If I were you and didn't have any info on the thread type you received I'd pass, or maybe do some prototyping on some bags, or something more heavy duty than quilting.
          You gots to risk it to gets the biscuit-

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          • #6
            Re: Nylon Thread

            Originally posted by oldmanquilts View Post
            I don't have any experience with nylon thread but some research indicates it is mainly used in heavy duty applications such as auto interiors, etc.

            This site has as much info as I've seen published- https://www.thethreadexchange.com/mi...ad-Information

            If I were you and didn't have any info on the thread type you received I'd pass, or maybe do some prototyping on some bags, or something more heavy duty than quilting.
            Oldmanquilts, Thank you for the link to a very informative article. I read on it that one of the sizes of nylon thread is Size 33. The box of bobbins does say 33 in large numbers, so that is probably the size. Here's what the article says: "Size 33 (Tex 30) nylon is a lightweight thread used on home and commercial machines with a size 80/12 to 90/14 needle. Its stitch appearance is inconspicuous. Most colors are on clearance, but black and white are standard."

            The box also says "Continuous Filament Nylon." The color is Wolf Grey which would be perfect for a quilt I'm piecing, but I'm undecided, so far, as to whether to use it. I sew small quilts, such as baby quilts, lap robes, and wall hangings. Nothing made of heavy-duty materials. I'll probably pass, or I may do a sample of something to see if my domestic machine would use it, but I don't want to make something that wouldn't last a long time. I do have some friends who make bags, so I may offer the bobbins to them.

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            • #7
              Re: Nylon Thread

              I have used "invisible" thread but the nylon thread of early days was terrible. As mentioned above like fishing line. I hadn't heard of this being used as a bobbin thread, only top thread. And I have never heard anyone using it for piecing, only quilting. The kind of invisible I have used is a Sulky 100% polyester and is not stiff at all. Although I only use it occasionally I have had no problems with it. I just use a 100% cotton in the bobbin and the invisible on top. I would be very hesitant to use the nylon as a bobbin thread.

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              • #8
                Re: Nylon Thread

                Originally posted by quiltingaway View Post
                I have used "invisible" thread but the nylon thread of early days was terrible. As mentioned above like fishing line. I hadn't heard of this being used as a bobbin thread, only top thread. And I have never heard anyone using it for piecing, only quilting. The kind of invisible I have used is a Sulky 100% polyester and is not stiff at all. Although I only use it occasionally I have had no problems with it. I just use a 100% cotton in the bobbin and the invisible on top. I would be very hesitant to use the nylon as a bobbin thread.
                This thread is pre-wound on bobbins. It is not invisible. I unwound a piece of it and it is grey when placed on a white surface. I don't think it would become invisible when sewn, unless it was sewn on grey fabric.

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                • #9
                  Re: Nylon Thread

                  Originally posted by am2901 View Post
                  All I've been able to find out about nylon thread is that it can melt, but surely that wouldn't happen with ordinary ironing or drying in a clothes dryer.
                  I doubt that a clothes dryer would cause problems, unless it's one of those laundromat/industrial ones that scorches everything. But I think a hot iron could easily melt this thread. Personally, I wouldn't risk it, because I hate having to clean goo off my iron.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Nylon Thread

                    Originally posted by am2901 View Post
                    This thread is pre-wound on bobbins. It is not invisible. I unwound a piece of it and it is grey when placed on a white surface. I don't think it would become invisible when sewn, unless it was sewn on grey fabric.
                    I realize you were talking about pre-wound bobbins. I was using the term "invisible" because the nylon thread was often referred to as that. It usually comes in either clear or grey. The grey is usually referred to as smoke. The clear works well on lighter colors and the grey works on darker colors.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Nylon Thread

                      I wouldn't trust nylon thread to quilt anything I took the time to make. Just my personal opinion.
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                      Scottie Mom Barb

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