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    Wool Ironing Mats

    Seems like some of the big names out there are talking about the wonders of the wool felted ironing mats. They are pricey, so I've got questions.

    Have any of you used them? If so, what are your impressions about them? There are several sizes available......do you see any advantages of one over the other? Do they actually work? The gurus are saying they iron your blocks better, everything better. Wondering if what they say is true or is it all hype!

    Anyway, I was wondering what y'all thought. Thank you!

    #2
    Re: Wool Ironing Mats

    I saw them for the first time on Shabby Fabrics. An instructor was making a project from felted wool and highly recommended the wool pressing mat. They are quite pricey and I'm not ready to try one out until I hear more about them.
    sigpicwww.whisperofrose.blogspot.com


    Scottie Mom Barb

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      #3
      Re: Wool Ironing Mats

      Well, I've never heard of them, but since wool and I don't get along I doubt that I'll ever have one.
      Katrina


      “Nothing can dim the light which shines from within.”
      ― Maya Angelou

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        #4
        Re: Wool Ironing Mats

        I am with Kartina, wool is not my friend either. Used to be the push for the heat reflective material, like heating both sides of material at same time, so maybe wool keeps heat longer and kinda works like a reflective material? I have also read where some like a more hard surface, keeping pieces completely flat, keeping bias pieces from stretching so easily. Of course one needs to remember (and I know this from experience) pressing and ironing is NOT the same. I have managed to skew a few seams here and there by ironing!

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          #5
          Re: Wool Ironing Mats

          I am on a very strict budget so I have not tried a wool pressing mat yet. Here is what I have learned so far

          Wool absorbs the steam when you do steam pressing
          Wool grips the fabric better when pressing seams (more friction)

          So if you press with a dry iron (like I almost always do) and finger press first, you will see almost no advantage to a wool pressing mat. Useless for paper piecing.

          If you love to steam press, and don't have time to finger press open first, a wool pressing mat may be your new best friend. Especially beneficial for pressing seams open.
          Stash Treasure Acquisitions Beyond Life Expectancy. My stash keeps me STABLE, oh yeah.... and dark chocolate.

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            #6
            Re: Wool Ironing Mats

            Thank you all for your input. I'm still investigating, so we'll see.

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              #7
              Re: Wool Ironing Mats

              Lots of reviews for this mat on Amazon with some good feedback. Might be worth looking at to get a better idea if this mat is for you or not.
              Courage is being scared to death, and saddling up anyway. ~John Wayne

              Quilting is my passion . . . chocolate is a close second!

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                #8
                Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                I've read and seen the demo on the wool mats too. I "almost" purchased one but before hitting the "add to cart" button, I recalled I had a 100% wool blanket in storage that we do not use. I decided to test it prior to buying the mat. Yes, there is an amazing difference using the 100% wool as a pressing mat. I was more than pleasantly surprised at how flat the blocks really were. I gave the purchase some major thought after the test and decided to continue to use the wool blanket instead. Why? I saturate my fabric with spray starch prior to cutting and believe the starch probably penetrates the wool as I press the blocks with steam; I can wash the blanket and I am uncertain the mats can be washed plus I imagine there would be shrinkage.

                If you do not have a 100% wool blanket or wool fabric to use, I would consider making the purchase.

                (FYI, I folded the blanket into several layers (approximately >1" thick) for a pressing mat to fit my ironing surface.)

                Hope this info helps.

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                  #9
                  Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                  Thank you sooooo much snowbird....you helped a lot! ....I don't have a wool blanket, but my son does......worth a test drive!

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                    #10
                    Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                    Snowbird, great idea! I have two wool Army blankets, so may have to give this a try. Having seen these wool pressing mats at a recent expo, I can also add, the blankets - purchased at an Army Surplus store, were a lot less expensive than the wool pad. But caution...if you decide to buy the Army blanket, make sure it's 100% wool (some aren't).

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                      #11
                      Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                      How can you be sure it is 100% wool? I have a cedar chest full of Pendleton wools purchased by my mom years ago. She made all our coats and blazers for years. I would love to try some wool as a pressing surface.....thinking I would layer several pieces and serge the edges..... or serge a big piece and fold it to make a pad like surface. Is there a way to tell if any of this is 100 % wool?

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                        #12
                        Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                        Ok.....so I did a little research. I guess you can burn it and look for ash, not melted plastic. Or you can put a scrap into a glass jar of bleach....if it is truly wool, it will completely dissolve. Not sure if I can tell if it is 100% or not, but willing to give it a try. I also looked up Pendleton wools and I guess their claim to fame is virgin wool fabrics. I may give them a call on Monday. Wow! I priced some.....I am sitting on a gold mine! What can I make with wool, besides coats and blazers?

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                          #13
                          Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                          Check out this link to test for 100% wool: http://threesheepstudio.blogspot.com...is-it-100.html

                          I was told many years ago that 100% wool will singe and not ignite with an open flame (at this age memory is questionable - LOL) so if it were me, I'd try a small sample outside; heaven forbid the house go up in flames trying this test inside the house!!!

                          Update:
                          I see you already found information on determining if the fabric is 100% wool.

                          Regarding your question as to what to do with wool. Wool is wonderful for crafting: penny rugs, rug hooking, quilts appliques or even the quilt as a whole). Stacy West of Buttermilk Basin has a website of patterns primarily made of wool. Primitive Gatherings also uses a lot of wools in her patterns.

                          Wool is my favorite fiber. Enjoy the journey into learning about the fiber and uses.
                          Last edited by snowbird; March 9th, 2018, 04:59 PM.

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                            #14
                            Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                            Even cheaper to try, and on my todo list since I have quite a few of these is:
                            100% wool coat that is out of style or not desirable from a thrift store for less than $10. Cut to size, and there ya go.
                            Some are thicker than others, and sometime the id tag [what you look for to be sure it's 100% wool] is inside the pocket.
                            Pieced By Me! :icon_wave:

                            Pre-cut Yardage Chart

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                              #15
                              Re: Wool Ironing Mats

                              I just bought one for 10 percent above wholesale. I have used it a couple of times. It stinks when ironed. I assume the stink is from the chemicals. Another downfall. You would not want to use starch on the mat. It doesn't tell you that, but we all know using starch on a regular ironing board can leave residue. So you would still have to have another ironing surface.

                              I used it several days after starching with no steam and it did well, but stunk. I am not sure is this would be worth full price. You know all this is, is a piece of wool soundproofing insulation that can be purchased at Home Depot or lowes for a fraction of the cost.

                              Another thing I don't understand about it. We iron on cottons on the cotton setting. If you iron wool, it is a lower setting. Wool is hair so overtime I think would burn.
                              Last edited by Deegles; March 10th, 2018, 07:52 PM.
                              Blogging ahead.....research in quilting and sewing with a dab of cooking/recipes too.

                              https://myquiltprojects.wordpress.com/

                              https://thecookbookproject.wordpress.com/

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