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    Heating Pad

    Not about quilting per-say but about sewing, does this count? Years and years ago a friend game me a pad you can put in the microwave and heat up. We used that thing all the time. It's in this house somewhere but we can't seem to find it. I'm sure it would be a quick project to make another one but wondering if anyone has hints. I think the one we had was filled with beans perhaps? Anyone know if rice or beans is better? Also, suggestion for material? Ours was almost like an upholstery fabric. I'm reading tutorials online and they all suggest something different from fleece to flannel to pretty quilted ones.

    #2
    Re: Heating Pad

    One of the easiest nonsewing ways to make a microwave heat pad is to fill about 1/2 to 2/3 full a new men's tube sock with rice. Then you just tie a knot in the end.

    Fabric choice when you sew can be anything that you feel like using. Except stay away from a really loose weave as it could get holes in it easily. As far as filling, between rice or beans, I would think rice would be a better choice. Although I have seen heating pads done with rice, soybeans or corn.

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      #3
      Re: Heating Pad

      The first thing I think about rice is that if it gets wet, even a little, it gets moldy. There is a lot of rice in Hawaii.lol Check out this article.

      http://www.sew4home.com/tips-resourc...n-and-flaxseed
      🌺 Lorie

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        #4
        Re: Heating Pad

        I make these all of the time and I use flax seed - since flax seeds are mostly oil they hold the heat a long time. I usually use flannel, just because it is snuggly, but regular cotton would work too. Just make sure to use all cotton (including thread), since it is going in the microwave and could melt.
        Lisa

        M*QC forum is full of the best people!

        I'm not just buying fabric, I am supporting the economy...

        A bad day in the sewing room is better than a good day at the office.

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          #5
          Re: Heating Pad

          My doctor swears by the rice-in-a-tube sock method!

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            #6
            Re: Heating Pad

            They sell walnut shells here. I think it would work great. I have some and they are small just like rice.

            https://www.missouriquiltco.com/shop...tin-tree-farms
            Last edited by Hulamoon; January 18, 2017, 04:20 PM.
            🌺 Lorie

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              #7
              Re: Heating Pad

              Idk, just don't use popcorn

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                #8
                Re: Heating Pad

                When I attended my first retreat at M* I won a great heat bag made by Kensington (Gloria). It has some type of corn in it that stays hot for quite some time. Maybe she will come online with some help.
                Robin
                My Pinterest Page of the Quilts I've Made: http://www.pinterest.com/rwmomto3/quilts-ive-made/

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                  #9
                  Re: Heating Pad

                  Gloria used feed corn to fill hers. As for the tube socks, the elastic in the tops may pose a fire hazard since it is rubber or nylon or something not cotton.
                  K is for Karen 😊​..................
                  Cremation - My last hope for a smokin' hot body.


                  Before you speak,
                  T - is it TRUE?
                  H - is it HELPFUL?
                  I - is it INSPIRING?
                  N - is it NECESSARY?
                  K - is it KIND?

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                    #10
                    Re: Heating Pad

                    Originally posted by jjkaiser View Post
                    Idk, just don't use popcorn
                    LOL. Okay that made me laugh!

                    I've made several and always used rice. Just make sure you don't leave them on the bed after you've heated them up. My dogs chewed mine open to get the rice and ate it. What a mess! Rice everywhere and dog's with upset tummies
                    Patrice S

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                      #11
                      Re: Heating Pad

                      We use flax seeds from the feed store (better price). Flannel is our usual choice for the bags.
                      You can also sew channels into the bag to keep the filling from shifting. (Make bag. Turn out, then sew the channels like top stitching.)
                      I have made slippers using both cotton flannel and polyester fleece.
                      As long as you only zap them for 30 to 60 seconds, you are pretty safe. We usually go for 30, shake up the filling and go for another 30. If I shimmy the seeds around, I seem to get a more even heating and haven't had any burnt issues.
                      I have also added lavender in with the flax.
                      Be who you are and say what you feel
                      because those who mind don't matter,
                      and those who matter don't mind. - Dr. Seuss

                      http://www.toggpine.wordpress.com

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                        #12
                        Re: Heating Pad

                        I usually use low talc rice, cotton fabric and cotton thread. For a 3 compartment heat bag I'll cut a strip 40" x 7". Fold in half to measure 20" x 7" and sew up both sides using a 3/8" seam allowance. Pour in about 3/4 cup of rice and sew across at approximately 6". Do that again to make the second compartment. After pouring in the last 3/4 cup I tuck the cut ends in and double sew the opening closed.

                        The hardest part is trying to keep the rice from shifting when you are sewing across the bag. I usually use a square chopstick and use it as a guide to sew. PM if you'd like to do it that way and I can get more detailed.

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                          #13
                          Re: Heating Pad

                          Throw in some dried lavender with whatever filling you use.
                          "Never stop believing that fighting for what is right is worth it"
                          Hillary Clinton

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                            #14
                            Re: Heating Pad

                            I use muslin for the interior, make it about 12 inches square, or whatever size you want, divide into pockets, add rice or whatever to each pocket. I usually make a removable cover out of flannel. I have also used buck wheat.
                            Blessed are the children of the piecemakers for they shall inherit the quilts!

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                              #15
                              Re: Heating Pad

                              I have two. One is filled with corn. The other with herbs.
                              Have a blessed day
                              Pam[/I]
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