Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

sit down quilting machines

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    sit down quilting machines

    Sit down quilting machines have two orientations. Either the mid-arm machine orientation presents like a domestic machine with the harp going side to side or it presents like a long arm machine with the harp going front to back. When quilting a twin bed top, which orientation requires less arm strength? Which one is more natural for sit-down quilting? Any thoughts about your experience would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

    #2
    Re: sit down quilting machines

    Have you thought about a long arm and frame and sitting on a bar stool that has wheels on it? Or some type of high chair.

    I joined QNNTV a while back so I could watch Quilt It, the Longarm Quilting Show. One of the guests on there said she sits down to quilt on her longarm and frame.

    I know it's a whole lot easier to load a large quilt on a frame than it is to try to make a quilt sandwich on the floor. I have high blood pressure and bad knees so it really is painful to do it that way.
    Vonnie

    Comment


      #3
      Re: sit down quilting machines

      I cannot get down on the floor to make my "quilt" sandwiches so this is how I do it. I have the craft/cutting table from Hancocks. The height is perfect and it has 2 leaves, which can be opened if needed for a bigger quilt. I lay the backing on table wrong side up with center back lined up with a penny I've taped to the table. I smooth out the back and start on one side pulling slightly taught. I then attach tablecloth clips like you would use when camping. They work perfect and hold the fabric in place. I then do the other side, top, and then bottom. This keeps my quilt completely smooth and then I pin baste. I then add the batting, removing the clips and then replacing over the 2 layers all the way around. Lastly I put the quilt top wrong side down and repeat. This will do the majority of the quilt and since I'm working out from the center I get a smooth non wonky sandwich. If my quilt is larger then the table, I simply remove all the clips and move the quilt and do each side. It actually goes fast and I never get ripples in my quilts. I have used spray basting and pins on really large quilts, but honestly I prefer to just pin. It works great and my knees are grateful.
      Keep the Faith

      dizzyLiz

      http://soundclick.com/share.cfm?id=1196342

      Comment


        #4
        Re: sit down quilting machines

        Martelli makes a longarm that you can use standing or sitting. It is the machine of my dreams, and it will stay that way because it is more than I can afford at present time.
        pat.

        No rain....no rainbows!


        sigpic

        If you can't be nice.....BE QUIET!

        Comment


          #5
          Re: sit down quilting machines

          I tried the drafting chair with the long arm while at a retreat last year. It was great. So much better on the back after long periods.
          Karen
          Spring, TX

          Comment


            #6
            Re: sit down quilting machines

            Originally posted by icthus View Post
            Either the mid-arm machine orientation presents like a domestic machine with the harp going side to side or it presents like a long arm machine with the harp going front to back. When quilting a twin bed top, which orientation requires less arm strength?
            For a twin either one would do. My preference is the long-arm orientation (harp front to back.) I like quilting from one side to the other - much like a long arm. The part that's already been quilted would then be rolled under the harp.

            If I wanted to quilt side to side with the harp set like a standard domestic machine I would be constantly rolling and unrolling the portion under the harp. (If someone knows of a different way please let me know! )

            Comment


              #7
              Re: sit down quilting machines

              I tried the long-arm orientation on the last big quilt I did. It seemed to be easier to maneuver the quilt side to side like Judy said. It was a bit different because I usually start in the middle and work in sections but once I got started I liked it.
              “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

              ― Albert Pine

              Comment


                #8
                Re: sit down quilting machines

                I will have to try the long arm orientation... It does seem easier/simpler now that I visualized it. Thanks for the question..
                Judy

                Click HERE to find me and My imagination
                :icon_wave:

                Comment

                Working...
                X