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    Long Arm rental from a local quilter

    Lets say there is a long arm quilter in your area, not associated with a local fabric shop.
    She does not want to quilt for others but is willing to rent use of her home machine. The machine is on a 100" wide frame and would require that you quilt your item at her house.

    I don't want to quilt for others but I think I'm open to renting time on my machine. I'd like input on what people here think is fair. Here's some of the things I'm thinking about. You may think of more.

    First time users to the machine require my time, lesson time. Includes setting up quilt on frame. Machine oiling, needle change, how to use the bobbin gauge, setting stitch regulator etc. You supply all your own quilting materials. Cost of lesson? Does it also include cost of use of the machine by the day? hour? First time with lesson you get to quilt your item for free. Should a limit be placed on the size of the item for the first lesson?

    Subsequent uses of the machine after having a lesson. Rental by the hour? day? Cost?

    Anyway what would you think is fair and light to see if you were renting someone elses machine? Any thoughts?
    https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
    Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

    #2
    Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

    I would have no idea. I would be afraid to use someone elses equipment but then, I'm mechanically challenged. (lol)
    Walk in peace with the Lord by your side.
    Terry

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      #3
      Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

      There are a couple shops here that rent their LAs. You take a 2-3 hour class for around $65. One place allows an hour practice time where you can practice on your own quilt or one of their charity quilts. After that it is $15-18 per hour. I believe that would be a fair amount for a private individual.
      I haven't taken a class, although I plan on it this Fall. Either place I will have a 30/45 minute drive each way.

      Also wanted to add, one shop charges extra if you need an employees assistance. I would think that would be a good idea for you to consider so you aren't being interrupted constantly
      Last edited by bakermom; August 30, 2016, 09:26 AM. Reason: doublechecked cost
      β€œWhat we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

      ― Albert Pine

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        #4
        Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

        My opinion, having taken the classes & renting the long arm @ several of my LQS's...

        Having someone readily available (not busy with other customers) if I run into problems, and not having the interruptions of other customers coming over to see what I'm working on and asking me half a dozen questions (what pattern is that, what fabric collection, who's it for, etc) would be worth paying more than what the shops charge.

        So I would suggest finding out what your local shops charge, if it's by the hour, jack it up another $5 (or more), if it's by the square inch, jack that up another penny or two psi.

        Heck, I would actually end up saving money in the long run, as I wouldn't end up also "shopping" before and after my quilting session!

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          #5
          Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

          There is a in-the-basement-of-a-house shop near Chicago that does this - their machine is not computerized. There is an initial charge for a class to learn about the machine. The hourly charge is really reasonable. The owner does all the machine maintenance (oiling, etc.) And I believe the owner also loads the quilt on the LA.

          I'll pm the link when I find it.

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            #6
            Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

            Here's the link to a shop near me:

            http://www.quiltingonthesquare.com/longarmrental.aspx

            I've thought about taking their class, but the times haven't worked out so far.
            Lori

            http://sewtimeforme.blogspot.com/

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              #7
              Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

              I think the first thing you'll need to do is guage what the going rate is in your area, if you can find others doing this. I own my own machine, but because I created a quilt that is 2 inches too wide for my frame (yeah, I know that was dumb, won't do that again), I had to look for a place with a larger frame to rent. I have found various rates for rental and the required training. Even though I own a longarm, the shop still required that I go for an evaluation to make sure I really do know what I'm doing. Remember that their end product is a reflection of your business. The shop I am going to for a rental does not require you to know how to thread the machine. They help you with getting the tension correct, etc. I will PM you with details from my local area.

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                #8
                Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                I figure with the fair coming up mid Sept that I could have some handouts there for local quilters. There are quite a few around here but no quiliting machines for rent locally. The closest that I know of is about an hour or so away. I think there are enough quilters around that a rental might fill a nitch. I think there may also be an interest from some of the shops to refer people who are interested in leasing time.

                The down side is that it can be hard on a machine if the people don't really know what they are doing. So although I can do most of the maintenance mechanics myself, I'd probably still want to get a mechanic in once or twice a year and that is around 70-90 dollars a pop. Basically, I'd love to be able to bring in around $200 a month if I can. I don't want an eventual full time business but just make a little extra to supplement the social security.

                So maybe $50 that includes a basic how to do the setting up lesson (using their quilting supplies) and one hour free quilting practice time. Then $18 per hr for quilting time after. After they've completed one project, they can call and lease time without the lesson at $18 per hr. I'd like people to be able to enjoy quilting themselves at a reasonable price but not cheat myself or sell myself short. It probably means I'd also have to set up a free for hourly lessons. Last year at the fair two people asked me if I'd teach them how to quilt and I hadn't given it any thought so lost those two. :-/ So I guess $18 an hour for quilt related lessons would be a fair price too?
                Judy and Caroline that is good information :-)
                https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
                Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

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                  #9
                  Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                  Another thing to think about - having people come into your home to do this is a business and you would be required to have additional insurance to cover anything that might happen while they are there. Some communities have different regulations about foot traffic for businesses located in residential areas. Be sure and check into all of that as well. It's sort of a CYOA type deal.
                  K is for Karen πŸ˜Šβ€‹..................
                  Cremation - My last hope for a smokin' hot body.


                  Before you speak,
                  T - is it TRUE?
                  H - is it HELPFUL?
                  I - is it INSPIRING?
                  N - is it NECESSARY?
                  K - is it KIND?

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                    #10
                    Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                    Lori that info is good stuff. I'd probably make a few adjustments since this is in house and not a shop. I like the way their information page is and I think I'd design my handout with a lot of that type of information. I couldn't bring myself to charge $150 for certification on the machine. I want it to be set up so most people can save a little, see if they like using the machine before they consider investing all that money themselves. So more for convenience locally.

                    There are no shops locally that do this so there are no going rates locally Karen :-)
                    https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
                    Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

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                      #11
                      Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                      Keep in mind the the $150 for certification is a one time fee. That's what my local shop charges for a 3 hour certification class. Don't undersell yourself. A little income is great, but you want to make sure you cover your expenses. Remember, you paid for the machine, you pay for repairs, electricity, AC/heat, insurance, etc. Those are all worth something. I sent you some links for my area. It ranges 15- 32.50 per hour.

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                        #12
                        Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                        The two LQS I use, I paid
                        Shop #1
                        $100 for the class, and $15 per hour of use on the machine. I also was required to purchase my zipper leader and bobbins from that shop.

                        Shop #2
                        $90 for the class, and $20 per hour of use on the machine, and was required to purchase my needles from that shop.

                        Of course both shops required me to provide my own thread, backing, and batting (or they would sell it to me), as well as pins/scissors/seam ripper/screw driver/band-aids (yeah I go thru a lot of those when I sew - pesky pins).

                        I think the prices you are thinking are very reasonable, and if anything, a little low, especially since it sounds like you have no competition at this time, and as K.McEuen pointed out, you will have additional expenses such as extra maintenance on the machine and liability insurance just to name a few.

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                          #13
                          Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                          Yes, good mentioning the liability insurance. I currently have a renters insurance that I can tack on to. I don't have a problem with my landlord approving me doing this. I think at this point it is more about putting out feelers in the community to see if it's wanted/needed and at the point. My main contact I believe at the fair will be from local quilters for the handouts. I believe we have about two guilds in the area. If there is interest I'd probably do two or three to make sure that it's something that could work for me and that they might be happy with. Then I'd check out about town requirements etc. There was some talk among some of the local quilters last year at the fair as to starting up a co op to promote the sale of local's quilts. Nothing has happened on that yet but wouldn't that be nice!
                          https://forum.missouriquiltco.com/co.../icon_wave.gif
                          Women are Angels. When someone break's our wings we will continue to fly-usually on a broomstick.We're flexible like that.

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                            #14
                            Re: Long Arm rental from a local quilter

                            Peggy Anne quilted one of her quilts that way. It turned out awesome.

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