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  • quiltingaway
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I thought it was very good article and had some good points. I try to shop locally as often as possible. I feel compelled to support the LQS. I want them to stay in business and be there when I need them. When I first moved here there were no local shops and I remember that all too well. My exception to that is I do try to buy directly from some authors and pattern designers, the ones whose blogs I follow. I think we all shop differently at different stages of our lives. When I was a young Mother there wasn't alot of money for my quilting or crafting. I am now an empty nester, working full time with less money restraints. In a few years I will be retired and my spending habits will change yet again. Hopefully I will have enough in my stash to see me through

    Leave a comment:


  • bec
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Originally posted by quiltingtrish View Post
    I for one cannot justify purchasing a book for $30. when I can probably get the same one for $5. or less at a library sale or guild sale. I also cannot justify paying $11. or $12. a yard when I can go to fabric stores and get the same (yes, the same fabric) for $6. or less. Yes, I look for bargin's and that is how I built my stash over the years. I am fortunate that I can hit good fabric shops that are about an hour of my home and it is a good day when I can take off for the day and hit 4 or 5 in one day. The local LQS offer classes when I am working and charge about $45. a class so I don't do those.
    She said the older people have their stashes and the younger ones can only buy a few fat quarters at a time. With the economy the way it is - kids can't get a job, have student loans, and move home or get a job that doesn't pay much. Well, their goes the parent's money and for me, as much as I love quilting I can't put fabric first at $11 or 12 a yard if I've got monthly bills to pay first. If you are one of the lucky ones and have the money - go for it. But the majority these days don't. It is what floats your boat too. Some people have the campers - well, they cost money. Some people love to shop - I don't know how retail stores stay in business - yes, I know a lot are closing. I can't tell you the last time I stepped into a Kohl's or Sears or whatever - as much as I don't like Walmart that is usually where I go to get the staple stuff for food and household and do use coupons. I'm lucky I work in town so hardly use any gas - there are about 4/5 of my town people that drive an hour to get to a job.

    I also got 6 people involved in quilting over the years so they have supported the industry. A few of them have the money to pay the higher end for the price of fabrics and some of us don't. The ones that I know that do supposedly have the money and spend also complain how broke they are. I guess I might be getting off the topic a little but it all comes down to what people want to spend the money they have on and where they have to cut. I am lucky that I find the local sales - be it yard sales selling fabric or wait until business's going out to slash their prices. When I get emails from a business with the headlines yelling BIG SALE and I read to find out I will get 10% off, I move along. Business' get offended when we don't want their kits, prices at $11 or 12 a yard, then they need to keep finding those people that can afford it. Yay for MSQ who figured out how to sell to the public and make the money back and more - the local LQS that cater to the usually local people will never compete with that.
    I put my opinion out there whether you agree or not.
    I didn't share this article to offend anyone. I just thought she had some ideas and insight that I hadn't thought of before and were interesting...for instance about how the author didn't get as much from his/her book if it was bought on Amazon. Not everyone or maybe anyone can follow all the things that she suggested. They are just suggestions.

    Leave a comment:


  • The_Last_Unicorn
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I think the quilt industry is already adapting to younger consumers who mainly shop online. They offer sales, services, and exclusive products. Fat Quarter Shop and others offer specially curated fabric collections that give you a color coordinated sampler that goes across fabric lines. Many offer Birch Box-like subscriptions that send you a box of fabric and notions every month, or they host BOMs. Now, MSQC offers their own line of thread which has (at least from looks) comparable quality to brands like Aurifil for a fair price. Craftsy provides a platform for quilting teachers to reach customers who are too busy to attend a class in person.

    The weekly tutorials have been a great way to keep the MSQC brand present in quilters' minds, offer inspiration, and promote new fabric lines. Designer fabric lines often have limited runs, so there's an incentive to buy a bundle of it while it's still readily available. After that, there are third party sellers who offer fabric from discontinued lines - sometimes for more, sometimes for less than the original price. Bloggers also post their creations using the latest fabric lines, and that definitely helps create an almost cult following for certain designers.

    It's interesting to see how small quilting companies are innovating and connecting to their customers. It's a refreshing change from big-box fabric stores that inflate prices up to 200% the going price, then turn around and offer you 50% off coupons to try to whip you into a buying frenzy because you're getting such a "good deal."

    Leave a comment:


  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Originally posted by bec View Post
    I don't think that was her intention. There's always exceptions, as in your case, and some others. I order from Amazon a lot myself, but I know that I could buy the same book directly from the author on their website. I didn't realize that the author's got a lot less of the money if it was bought on Amazon. I'm going to start buying directly from the author when possible.
    I don't think it as either, it was just a knee jerk reaction. It's from being on an island too long. lol

    Leave a comment:


  • quiltingtrish
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I for one cannot justify purchasing a book for $30. when I can probably get the same one for $5. or less at a library sale or guild sale. I also cannot justify paying $11. or $12. a yard when I can go to fabric stores and get the same (yes, the same fabric) for $6. or less. Yes, I look for bargin's and that is how I built my stash over the years. I am fortunate that I can hit good fabric shops that are about an hour of my home and it is a good day when I can take off for the day and hit 4 or 5 in one day. The local LQS offer classes when I am working and charge about $45. a class so I don't do those.
    She said the older people have their stashes and the younger ones can only buy a few fat quarters at a time. With the economy the way it is - kids can't get a job, have student loans, and move home or get a job that doesn't pay much. Well, their goes the parent's money and for me, as much as I love quilting I can't put fabric first at $11 or 12 a yard if I've got monthly bills to pay first. If you are one of the lucky ones and have the money - go for it. But the majority these days don't. It is what floats your boat too. Some people have the campers - well, they cost money. Some people love to shop - I don't know how retail stores stay in business - yes, I know a lot are closing. I can't tell you the last time I stepped into a Kohl's or Sears or whatever - as much as I don't like Walmart that is usually where I go to get the staple stuff for food and household and do use coupons. I'm lucky I work in town so hardly use any gas - there are about 4/5 of my town people that drive an hour to get to a job.

    I also got 6 people involved in quilting over the years so they have supported the industry. A few of them have the money to pay the higher end for the price of fabrics and some of us don't. The ones that I know that do supposedly have the money and spend also complain how broke they are. I guess I might be getting off the topic a little but it all comes down to what people want to spend the money they have on and where they have to cut. I am lucky that I find the local sales - be it yard sales selling fabric or wait until business's going out to slash their prices. When I get emails from a business with the headlines yelling BIG SALE and I read to find out I will get 10% off, I move along. Business' get offended when we don't want their kits, prices at $11 or 12 a yard, then they need to keep finding those people that can afford it. Yay for MSQ who figured out how to sell to the public and make the money back and more - the local LQS that cater to the usually local people will never compete with that.
    I put my opinion out there whether you agree or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • bec
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Originally posted by Hulamoon View Post
    It's a nice thought to not use Massdrop etc or Amazon to help out fabric and book sellers. I live on an island with limited resources. Since our Borders shut down, Amazon is the only place to get books. I have to use them to order children's books for my grandchild. Maybe that's why I thought it came across as a little preachy. Just a tiny bit.
    I don't think that was her intention. There's always exceptions, as in your case, and some others. I order from Amazon a lot myself, but I know that I could buy the same book directly from the author on their website. I didn't realize that the author's got a lot less of the money if it was bought on Amazon. I'm going to start buying directly from the author when possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • bec
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Originally posted by Alpha O View Post
    Some of us try to. But the stores simply can't carry all the books you want, and what they do have is not to your taste.
    You have to order from Amazon to get. I don't like this years colors and won't buy.

    Whoever wrote this letter is definitely urban. If you get to the middle of the country, including Nevada, a quilter may have to travel over 100+ miles to a store. They make it an occasion and enjoy themselves, but if the store is depending on weekly, it might be a no-go. The store could have a well designed web page and offer shipping. Those who know the store's honesty and quality will buy.

    Even then, there might not be a reliable internet connection for a website.

    Since millenials seem to purchase fat quarters, feature quilts that can be made from many color and style fat quarters so they can buy as they need and have a nice finished quilt.

    I do buy quilting fabric locally, but our local fabric stores do not or will not sell sweatshirt fleece or good knit fabric.
    I have to order from elsewhere. I prefer to make my own sweatshirts.
    I think she's saying to buy locally if you can, but if you shop the internet, try to stay away from the big sites like fabric.com ( which is actually a part of amazon, I think). I know that there are only a couple of quilt stores convenient to me and they are very limited in their variety. Etsy has a lot of small business quilt shops and I buy from them often as well as from M*.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squeaky
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I try to shop at my LQS but I was very put-off when I wanted to order two Deb Tucker rulers from them instead of from the web and they "held" my order until they got more requests. They didn't tell me this, they only told me they'd order them and let me know when they came in. A month later I called to ask how much longer it would be and they told me they just order from the same place I would order from on the web but they wait until they have more to lower the shipping cost.

    If they aren't going to even offer the hands-on service that I can't get from the web, then I will move on to another store. They also closed @ 5pm on weekdays and didn't have any weekend classes or meet-ups. Not all of us are retired or stay-at-home types, so being more accommodating of the hours some of us work might help them out too.

    I have to try to get to the next-closest LQS but it's about 35-45 min from me and not as easy to make time for. They do offer some better afternoon/evening hours and are open on Sundays so it sounds like I just need to make a date and go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    It's a nice thought to not use Massdrop etc or Amazon to help out fabric and book sellers. I live on an island with limited resources. Since our Borders shut down, Amazon is the only place to get books. I have to use them to order children's books for my grandchild. Maybe that's why I thought it came across as a little preachy. Just a tiny bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • shirleyknot
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I support my LQS. Its cheaper than shopping on line in most cases (don't forget to add shipping), AND I get to feel the fabric before I buy. Probably should factor in the cost of your internet too, since without it, you wouldn't be shopping on line, right?
    If everyone spent only $10 a month at a local shop, there would be a big improvement in the quilting society.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alpha O
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Originally posted by bec View Post
    We are seeing quilt stores close by the scores and I thought this article had a lot of good points about how quilters as individuals can help the industry.https://craftnectar.com/2016/08/08/united-we-stand/

    Some of us try to. But the stores simply can't carry all the books you want, and what they do have is not to your taste.
    You have to order from Amazon to get. I don't like this years colors and won't buy.

    Whoever wrote this letter is definitely urban. If you get to the middle of the country, including Nevada, a quilter may have to travel over 100+ miles to a store. They make it an occasion and enjoy themselves, but if the store is depending on weekly, it might be a no-go. The store could have a well designed web page and offer shipping. Those who know the store's honesty and quality will buy.

    Even then, there might not be a reliable internet connection for a website.

    Since millenials seem to purchase fat quarters, feature quilts that can be made from many color and style fat quarters so they can buy as they need and have a nice finished quilt.

    I do buy quilting fabric locally, but our local fabric stores do not or will not sell sweatshirt fleece or good knit fabric.
    I have to order from elsewhere. I prefer to make my own sweatshirts.
    Last edited by Alpha O; August 8, 2016, 07:50 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bakermom
    replied
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    Makes some good points, but we all have to do what's best for ourselves. What is affordable to one may make this hobby out of reach for another.

    Leave a comment:


  • bec
    started a topic Saving the quilting industry article

    Saving the quilting industry article

    We are seeing quilt stores close by the scores and I thought this article had a lot of good points about how quilters as individuals can help the industry.https://craftnectar.com/2016/08/08/united-we-stand/
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