Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Saving the quilting industry article

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

    I have not read the article yet but it was interesting to read everyone's reaction to it. I find it also interesting that some people consider 30-40 min drive so far. LOL I don't have a quilt shop even that close. We have a sewing center who also carries some fabric, notions, and other items. They do machine repair, have classes, and monthly meetings. They are also very nice and welcoming but $$. I took a class and had a lot of fun but I doubt I can afford to take many more. I will be making most of my quilts by you tube with jenny or others. I will have to drive an hour away to a joan's or order fabric online.

    I have been looking at today's deal and trying to decide if it is better to get the kit or slowly buy the pieces needed to make the quilt. I love the fabric and got to see this quilt made. It was very pretty. But again, I will be ordering it online.

    Comment


      #17
      Re: Saving the quilting industry article

      Originally posted by tsladaritz View Post
      I find it also interesting that some people consider 30-40 min drive so far. LOL








      Me too. I'm always wondering why that seems far.
      🌺 Lorie

      Comment


        #18
        Re: Saving the quilting industry article

        I can drive for 30 - 40 minutes in one direction and still be in town. Albuquerque is spread out.
        K is for Karen 😊​ Albuquerque, NM..................
        Cremation - My last hope for a smokin' hot body.


        Before you speak,
        T - is it TRUE?
        H - is it HELPFUL?
        I - is it INSPIRING?
        N - is it NECESSARY?
        K - is it KIND?

        Comment


          #19
          Re: Saving the quilting industry article

          I didn't mean to sound offended. I just gave my opinion. I thought it was interesting too, thank you for posting it.
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/quiltsbytrish
          http://quiltdreaming.blogspot.com
          http://pinterest.com/TrishLapp


          What if you woke up today and the only things you had were the things you thanked God for yesterday? :icon_hug:quilting trish

          Comment


            #20
            Re: Saving the quilting industry article

            This article was very informative. I have resolved that if I buy a quilting book, I will go to the author's web site and purchase there. But - full disclosure - I don't buy too many books!

            Two of my favorite LQS closed a few years ago. There are two others which are within a 20 minute drive, and several more that are at a longer distance. I also have the Lancaster area quilt shops if I want to go a further distance. When I am able, I supported the LQS. I still try to buy some of my fabric from those remaining. But, when I go there, I go to their sales area first! It is very hard for my budget to buy fabric at $13/yd when I can get lovely fabric, on sale, on line, for $4/yd.

            My experience with LQS has also been iffy. Early on in my quilting life, I was shopping for a variety of blue and brown threads for FMQ. At one LQS, I saw a wonderful display of Isacord threads. BUT - the very young, and, as I now know, inexperienced, clerk, told me that those threads were for embroidery. So, I didn't buy any. I later learned that those threads were perfect for FMQ. They lost a sale that day because their sales staff did not have enough education.

            Another problem I had with a LQS, which I felt is totally unacceptable, is when the shop owner "helped" me pin baste a quilt. This was my first large quilt - king size. The owner did not make sure the backing was secured. Fortunately, I followed the rule of quilting out from the center. I had to rearrange the basting after every block I quilted. And, as I got to the borders, I ended up with not enough backing on one side and too much on the other. I was able to fix the problem and the final results were lovely - but it was through no help of the quilt shop owner.

            Because of these negative experiences with LQS, I can not fully support them. Sure, I can say, check with your LQS - but if you are inexperienced, how do you know if they are experienced - or not? Everyone provides advice from their own level of experience. That may be enough, or it may not. This forum is very helpful in this regard, as we have so many with many levels of experience.

            I will continue to purchase from a LQS when I can, and I will also continue to purchase from online sources. I don't take classes any more, mostly because I can't afford them, and secondarily, because I can either figure it out for myself, or find the same information on the internet.
            If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.- Zig Ziglar

            Comment


              #21
              Re: Saving the quilting industry article

              I do not believe there is a shortage of crafters, sewers, quilters, stamp collectors, etc. The difference is how and where they buy their supplies. Paradigms are shifting and businesses need to shift as well. Social media and other online presences are more important. Americans, starting with x-gen, earn less than than their parents and have less to spend. Coupled with record-level rents and mortgages, having to keep two jobs and still not earning any extra money, then Amazon becomes much easier than driving around to different shops, and it saves money.

              It's sad that so many stores (of all kinds, not just quilting) are closing, but unfortunately people aren't going to bypass Walmart or Starbucks or Amazon to shop locally. My area doesn't have many craft stores anyway - I guess big city people aren't into it. I lived here for a few years in the 80's as well and it was the same back then too, so it isn't like anything has changed here. Though maybe twenty or 50 years before that it was different.

              The town I grew up in had a big crafting presence that still survives today. One small business is still around - and it's one of only two shops still open in a large empty shopping center. The owners are getting on in years, so who knows how much longer it will be around. It has shifted it's product line though. Once only discount fabrics, it now has a wide array of quilting fabrics and supplies. Perhaps that has kept them going (the ability to adapt). I visited them last month (while visiting relatives) and it was fun to look and I'd like to go back and buy a few things (kind of pressed for time on that trip unfortunately). I'm hoping to move back there next year - would be fun to have fabric stores to shop at again.

              Comment


                #22
                Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                This is what I have experienced. I live in rural Texas where a 40 minute drive is normal. I am used to that so I am okay with it. When I worked outside the home (which I hated, I am a home body), I spent some of my salary on fabric so I would have fabric when I retired. I am now enjoying that stash as I do not have near as much to spend on garment and sewing fabric as I did when I worked. Personally, I have always sewed and I sewed with what I could afford at that time. I bought several BOM quilts that I loved when I worked because I could pay a little each month and have a large quilt at the end of that BOM, Most of these came from The Fat Quarter Shop. I still have some of those that I have not started but they are complete with all the fabric I need to make the quilt. As far as LQS, I love, love, love them especially for matching thread for FMQ and I do buy some of their fabric occasionally. Jenny introduced me to precuts which I love. I have learned to buy border and backing fabric that goes with my precut because by the time I get around to piecing it that particular collection is often no longer available so I always buy 2-1/2 yds of border/binding fabric when I buy the precut. I truly believe that some LQS have not adjusted their business plan to today's quilters. Quilters today often work outside the home which means that their hours have to cater to that quilter because that quilter often has more money to spend. Being open one night a week until 8 or 9 o'clock, being open all day on Saturday and not just until 2 p.m. is crucial as is being open on Sunday afternoon. I realize this is a lot of hours but the quilt shops that do this seem to be flourishing. I believe the secret to a successful business is to find your clientele's needs and fill those needs whether it be stocking more precuts or adjusting store hours so those customers can purchase merchandise from you.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                  There is just so much "stuff" out there - I think one of the issues is that a lot of quilt projects these days are all about fast, easy projects. This is all well and good, but paying retail for a quilt project that can be finished in a few days - that is where things get so expensive for us serial quilters, and leads to seriously bargain shop. If I have a retail fabric line, I'm looking for a challenging project that will allow me to handle this fabric for a while - more bang for the buck in my way of rationalizing the cost. I have a few fat quarter bundles just sitting around waiting for that perfect project, but I'll whip out a scrap quilt without a thought.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                    I guess this is what a free market economy is like. If you can't give the customer what the want at a price they can live with, then you will probably lose your business. It all balances itself out. If the authors of the books don't like the profit they achieve from Amazon, perhaps they should sell their products as exclusives in other venues.
                    success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiam
                    Terry of NC

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                      I support two shops in Florida often. One has a weekly sit and sew that's free. We bring a lunch or go to the great little bakery next door for take out. I seldom leave without buying something at that shop. Their classes are extremely well priced and everyone there is very friendly and helpful. I do visit other shops when we travel. Here in Maine, I shop around since there aren't many shops where I live here. I also have a friend with an online business that I support. She always has great, new stuff. Then, there are also M* and some other online businesses that I buy from.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                        I want to agree with the writer, but can't. The second you put the burden of the success of your business on the consumers shoulders, you lose. It all sounds good in theory, but like a lot of things in life (um, all, actually) reality wins every time.

                        The Doan family is a prime example. They are all inclusive, unlike other well known online quilt shops that make me feel like I have to love only floral appliqué or be a cutesy sorority girl to find things in their store I like (exaggerating, of course, but I'm talking about appeal). They don't just hope we will buy from them, they work themselves to the brink studying other businesses and are constantly improving and growing. They want to know what we all want -- very unlike my LQS that sells what they like and think every customer must love it. M* also makes me feel super welcome from half a country away, something local shops almost never have a clue how to do. I do have one LQS I like, but they sell mostly blenders and display sharp pointy quilts, totally not my thing so there isn't often much I need from that shop.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                          I agree with you stitchwishes. Like I said...the free market wins every time.
                          success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiam
                          Terry of NC

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Re: Saving the quilting industry article

                            I enjoyed the article and want to say thank you for sharing. I dont support the localquilt ahop too often for several reasons. Hours are mostly outside my work hours except weekends when I have many things to do. I get there once every several months. Their prices are just too high for me. Their classes are almost all during the week during the day, I cannot take off work.

                            However I highly support several on line shops that also employ people obviously in the industry. I work long hours so I am able to spend a bit on my craft. I do not want to even think about how many dollars I have spent in the last couple years. Ugh. Trust me, I have truly done my part in supporting the craft. I teach my granddaughter, and share with anyone I meet my craft and how I oove it. Thats how we keep it alive.

                            I am not saying authors, designers and shop owners do not deserve their take, but I cannot justify spending over 10 a yard on fbric I cn get for half that price online. Have I, yes, when I really wanted something then and there. Or when I do stop in the LQS, I buy a couple things. But I would have very little stash if I piirchased that way all the time. I know when I retire my money will be almost all for overhead. I will be greatful for all I have stashed.

                            Again great article, but I think we are supporting the industry, all of us, whether its online or in person.
                            Karen
                            Life is short - Live everyday to the fullest

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X