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Should I purchase a long arm?

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  • ediane
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by Bubby View Post
    There is a lot to consider before making an investment in a long arm. You need to consider your age, physical condition and how many more years you realistically think you would be able to use the machine versus sending your quilts out to a longarmer. You can send a LOT of quilts out for what you would pay even for a lower end longarm. If you plan to make more small items you may be able to quilt them on your domestic machine that you piece with.

    In my case, we would have to add a room or remodel the garage to have room for a full-size longarm machine.

    I'm sure you will get loads of sound advice here. I have quilty friends who have bought longarms and the new little quilting machines and love them, but some regret spending the money. Take your time, weigh all your options and don't make a hasty decision you may regret later.
    Bubby I think it you hit this head on. At 69 I have arthritis in my neck from a car accident at 17. If I remain in the same position to long especially bending over looking down it becomes painful. 2 weeks ago I had to go into the ER with muscle spasms generating from my neck and was out of it for about 4 days to recover. The cost of a long arm is so much it is better and easier on me to have them quilted by someone else. I will still do baby quilts on my machine but nothing bigger. And then not all at one time. I even have to change out my beloved Juki portable to a Janome 3128 due to the weight when I go to QOV to sew.

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  • shermur
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Ask yourself....why do you think you want to own a long arm machine? Do you have the room for one? Do you have the funds for one?

    Regardless of how you quilt (hand quilting, tie quilting, or machine quilting), there is many variations to consider. But the one constant? You will have to practice to acquire the technique. I have hand quilted for many years (since 1992) due to the fact of not enough time, space and money.

    I recently took a class on how to quilt with my home sewing machine and it has brought me more confidence than I had. But, I still need to practice and make my technique more effortless. And then, you also have to consider your endurance. I agree with Vonnie...for test drive one for a while and see how effects you.

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  • Bubby
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    There is a lot to consider before making an investment in a long arm. You need to consider your age, physical condition and how many more years you realistically think you would be able to use the machine versus sending your quilts out to a longarmer. You can send a LOT of quilts out for what you would pay even for a lower end longarm. If you plan to make more small items you may be able to quilt them on your domestic machine that you piece with.

    In my case, we would have to add a room or remodel the garage to have room for a full-size longarm machine.

    I'm sure you will get loads of sound advice here. I have quilty friends who have bought longarms and the new little quilting machines and love them, but some regret spending the money. Take your time, weigh all your options and don't make a hasty decision you may regret later.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vonnie
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    It would be really great if you could go to a quilt show and take different ones for a test drive.

    The reason I think you need to take different brands for a test drive is because I took a sit down for a test drive and did not like how they did the stitch regulator. It was cumbersome. So get one that is comfortable to you. Are there any stores near you where you can test drive a machine?

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  • surfergirl
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    With a longarm machine you are standing up when quilting and running the machine over the fabric. With a sit down mid arm machine you are pushing the fabric around under the needle and sitting down. I have a Handi Quilter Sweet 16 that I love very much works for me and the table is only 36" wide by 30" deep so no problem with space. I did look at the Block Rocket machine at Road to California you might look into that machine it was about $3,900, sweet 16 was $5,100.

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  • Teacherbarber4
    started a topic Should I purchase a long arm?

    Should I purchase a long arm?

    I am sure this has been visited over and over. I am thinking very serious about purchasing a Babylock Coronet. I don't really have the room for a 10 foot table. Most of my quilts are at least 75 inches wide and 80 long. I have a Bernina 750 that I have stipples four quilts on. My question is does a stand up and long arm machine make it that much easier to quilt. When quilting I gat so much tent ion and strain on my me know and shoulders. Will this get any better?

    I appreciate any advice. I don't want to make the purchase of I will continue to have the pain.

    Thank you in advance,

    Shauna
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