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Should I purchase a long arm?

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  • quiltingaway
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by Jean Sewing Machine View Post
    I have a long arm. It's not fancy but it gets the job done. The way I figure it, quilting is a hobby. I know many people who have fancy wood working shops, big fishing boats, numerous fancy and Expensive cameras that they use for their hobby! These tools cost way more than my longarm did! I think we need to stop figuring out if it will pay for itself and figure out if we are worth it to continue our hobby and finish our quilts without putting undue stress on our bodies to quilt on a domestic machine. Just know, it's a learning curve and you will need to learn your machine and the techniques before you feel completely comfortable quilting on your longarm. But quilting on a longarm is more intuitive than quilting on a domestic, because it is like drawing with a pencil.

    Good luck with your decision.
    I SO agree with all this!

    Leave a comment:


  • rebeccas-sewing
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I agree! It's a purchase made not because it will eventually pay for itself. It's a tool that adds to the pleasure our hobby gives us. If you have the space, the money and are looking for a better way to quilt with less physical strain then go for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jean Sewing Machine
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by Vonnie View Post
    My husband is the one who used this argument to get me to buy a longarm. He knew I wanted one and was hesitant because of the price. He reminded me that he did not "need" a motorcycle but not only did I agree to him buying one but to him having two motorcycles. I also knew how much he enjoyed riding. He knows how much I want to do the entire quilt myself. We are each other's enablers. We should enjoy life. We worked hard and as long as the bills are paid first, why not have fun.
    Amen to that!

    Leave a comment:


  • Vonnie
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by Jean Sewing Machine View Post
    I have a long arm. It's not fancy but it gets the job done. The way I figure it, quilting is a hobby. I know many people who have fancy wood working shops, big fishing boats, numerous fancy and Expensive cameras that they use for their hobby! These tools cost way more than my longarm did! I think we need to stop figuring out if it will pay for itself and figure out if we are worth it to continue our hobby and finish our quilts without putting undue stress on our bodies to quilt on a domestic machine. Just know, it's a learning curve and you will need to learn your machine and the techniques before you feel completely comfortable quilting on your longarm. But quilting on a longarm is more intuitive than quilting on a domestic, because it is like drawing with a pencil.

    Good luck with your decision.
    My husband is the one who used this argument to get me to buy a longarm. He knew I wanted one and was hesitant because of the price. He reminded me that he did not "need" a motorcycle but not only did I agree to him buying one but to him having two motorcycles. I also knew how much he enjoyed riding. He knows how much I want to do the entire quilt myself. We are each other's enablers. We should enjoy life. We worked hard and as long as the bills are paid first, why not have fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • KarenC
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I own a longarm, and agree it would have been cheaper (in dollars) to just have someone else quilt my tops if I just wanted edge to edge patterns. Several factors went into my decision,
    1. I enjoyed the quilting part on a LA, but not on my domestic machine
    2. I can quilt (and practice) when I want to and when I am in the mood (creative juices flowing)
    3. Minimum charge for a quilt in my area is $50.
    4. I work hard for my money and deserve to treat myself to something I enjoy.
    5. Still have the ability to sit on a drafting chair and quilt along with my LA, if I get tired of standing, but this hasn't been an issue yet. I tried it out in a class, and it did get me a lot closer for the micro stippling.

    That being said, I am working on a king size quilt that I may not be able to do on my 10 ft frame, since it is a bit oversized. Decision still to be determined. But happy that when talking to the owner of the shop where I purchased my machine, he suggested that he can set up a 12 ft. frame in the shop and I can just come there to quilt it. He said it is a service he is willing to offer for his customers that have purchased machines from him. . Needless to say, this shop gets most of my LQS business. Yeah for them and yeah for me.

    Each person must first list out your priorities and pros and cons of purchasing, renting time on LA (if available in your area), using home machine, or sending out. Good luck with your decision, and don't second guess yourself once you decide. If you do decide to buy, definitely try out multiple brands and multiple machines within same brand.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jean Sewing Machine
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by Bernina2 View Post
    Unless you are going into business, personally I don't think
    You would quilt enough quilts to pay for the expense of a
    Long arm machine. I pay $35-50 dollars to have a lap quilt,
    50 x65 inches quilted. A long arm machine is $5000-8000.
    Plus they take up a lot of room.
    I can take a lot of quilts to someone else to quilt for that price.
    Finding someone to quilt for that price is rare! You are right, with that kind of service, it doesn't make sense to own an expensive machine. More likely is needing to pay upwards of $100 for that size quilt. I think Missouri Star charges $.02 per square inch. The ones I had them do for me were bed size and cost around $175. That is when owning your own machine makes sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lyndaj
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I became enamoured with a HandiQuilter Simply Sixteen with the little foot frame at the recent Quilt Canada. I also tried the HQ Sweet Sixteen sit down. IMHO only, I much prefer the stand up and the little foot frame is adjustable for height. Quilting on the Simply Sixteen is like driving and quilting on the Sweet Sixteen is like FMQ on my domestic Janome.

    If you have a dealer close by where you can go and play for a couple of hours you might get a good idea of how your body will handle it. Good luck.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jean Sewing Machine
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I have a long arm. It's not fancy but it gets the job done. The way I figure it, quilting is a hobby. I know many people who have fancy wood working shops, big fishing boats, numerous fancy and Expensive cameras that they use for their hobby! These tools cost way more than my longarm did! I think we need to stop figuring out if it will pay for itself and figure out if we are worth it to continue our hobby and finish our quilts without putting undue stress on our bodies to quilt on a domestic machine. Just know, it's a learning curve and you will need to learn your machine and the techniques before you feel completely comfortable quilting on your longarm. But quilting on a longarm is more intuitive than quilting on a domestic, because it is like drawing with a pencil.

    Good luck with your decision.

    Leave a comment:


  • cv quilter
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I just bought the Baby Lock Tiara III sit down long arm (the same machine as the Sweet 16. I'm told Baby Lock makes it). I find it very easy to use so far. Yes, it is an investment ($4700) show price, but I think for me it's going to be worth it. I want to do QOV and Linus Project quilts, as well as family quilts. I have had four quilts professionally quilted by LA and they turned out beautiful, but DH decided I should have my own machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • ediane
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Originally posted by MRoy View Post
    I don't have a long-arm, but I have a Juki TL2010Q on a queen sized Grace frame. I bought them because I didn't like quilting on a domestic sewing machine. I also had lots of tension in my neck, shoulders and back. With the frame, I can move the machine instead of the quilt and it's much easier on my neck and shoulders. I stand on a fatigue mat which helps my back, hips and legs. I'm also walking some when I'm rolling the quilt on the frame. I don't have room for a long-arm, but I hope up upgrade to a Q'nique or BlockRockit mid-arm in the future.
    I had this combination at one time and it worked well. I had to sell it because the area we had it in flooded and it took us a while to find the problem. Also even though it is slim line it takes up a lot of space if you extend it for a queen or king and I did not have the room.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernina2
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    Unless you are going into business, personally I don't think
    You would quilt enough quilts to pay for the expense of a
    Long arm machine. I pay $35-50 dollars to have a lap quilt,
    50 x65 inches quilted. A long arm machine is $5000-8000.
    Plus they take up a lot of room.
    I can take a lot of quilts to someone else to quilt for that price.

    Leave a comment:


  • MRoy
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I don't have a long-arm, but I have a Juki TL2010Q on a queen sized Grace frame. I bought them because I didn't like quilting on a domestic sewing machine. I also had lots of tension in my neck, shoulders and back. With the frame, I can move the machine instead of the quilt and it's much easier on my neck and shoulders. I stand on a fatigue mat which helps my back, hips and legs. I'm also walking some when I'm rolling the quilt on the frame. I don't have room for a long-arm, but I hope up upgrade to a Q'nique or BlockRockit mid-arm in the future.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I just watched a couple of videos on the Coronet and it looks like a wonderful machine. The price is close to $6,000. I paid ( rather am paying) $5,000 for my Cresendo. If that helps any.

    Leave a comment:


  • Teacherbarber4
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I will have a lot of years ahead of me as I am 43. Yes it is a lot of money. I am trying to justify to myself. I hate being pulled up with to do quilts and just dread them on my Bernina. I get so much pain in my shoulders a beck daily. I want to buy a machine that will last for a long time. Boron ably would not buy another. As my husband says "you don't go to bars!" LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Teacherbarber4
    replied
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    I have been looking at the Handy Quilter simply sweet sixteen and the Baby lock Coronet. They are the Same machine. My thought is I would not be pulling and tugging on the machine. I figure with a sit down only machine I would still have to pull around. I also thought about the block rockit but don't want the 10 foot table taking up so much space???? Don't know.

    Leave a comment:

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