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Should I purchase a long arm?

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    Should I purchase a long arm?

    I am sure this has been visited over and over. I am thinking very serious about purchasing a Babylock Coronet. I don't really have the room for a 10 foot table. Most of my quilts are at least 75 inches wide and 80 long. I have a Bernina 750 that I have stipples four quilts on. My question is does a stand up and long arm machine make it that much easier to quilt. When quilting I gat so much tent ion and strain on my me know and shoulders. Will this get any better?

    I appreciate any advice. I don't want to make the purchase of I will continue to have the pain.

    Thank you in advance,

    Shauna

    #2
    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

    With a longarm machine you are standing up when quilting and running the machine over the fabric. With a sit down mid arm machine you are pushing the fabric around under the needle and sitting down. I have a Handi Quilter Sweet 16 that I love very much works for me and the table is only 36" wide by 30" deep so no problem with space. I did look at the Block Rocket machine at Road to California you might look into that machine it was about $3,900, sweet 16 was $5,100.

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      #3
      Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

      It would be really great if you could go to a quilt show and take different ones for a test drive.

      The reason I think you need to take different brands for a test drive is because I took a sit down for a test drive and did not like how they did the stitch regulator. It was cumbersome. So get one that is comfortable to you. Are there any stores near you where you can test drive a machine?
      Vonnie

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        #4
        Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

        There is a lot to consider before making an investment in a long arm. You need to consider your age, physical condition and how many more years you realistically think you would be able to use the machine versus sending your quilts out to a longarmer. You can send a LOT of quilts out for what you would pay even for a lower end longarm. If you plan to make more small items you may be able to quilt them on your domestic machine that you piece with.

        In my case, we would have to add a room or remodel the garage to have room for a full-size longarm machine.

        I'm sure you will get loads of sound advice here. I have quilty friends who have bought longarms and the new little quilting machines and love them, but some regret spending the money. Take your time, weigh all your options and don't make a hasty decision you may regret later.
        sigpicwww.whisperofrose.blogspot.com


        Scottie Mom Barb

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          #5
          Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

          Ask yourself....why do you think you want to own a long arm machine? Do you have the room for one? Do you have the funds for one?

          Regardless of how you quilt (hand quilting, tie quilting, or machine quilting), there is many variations to consider. But the one constant? You will have to practice to acquire the technique. I have hand quilted for many years (since 1992) due to the fact of not enough time, space and money.

          I recently took a class on how to quilt with my home sewing machine and it has brought me more confidence than I had. But, I still need to practice and make my technique more effortless. And then, you also have to consider your endurance. I agree with Vonnie...for test drive one for a while and see how effects you.
          Sherri

          "Don't let someone else's ugly spoil your beautiful. " Thanks, Bubby!!!!!!

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            #6
            Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

            Originally posted by Bubby View Post
            There is a lot to consider before making an investment in a long arm. You need to consider your age, physical condition and how many more years you realistically think you would be able to use the machine versus sending your quilts out to a longarmer. You can send a LOT of quilts out for what you would pay even for a lower end longarm. If you plan to make more small items you may be able to quilt them on your domestic machine that you piece with.

            In my case, we would have to add a room or remodel the garage to have room for a full-size longarm machine.

            I'm sure you will get loads of sound advice here. I have quilty friends who have bought longarms and the new little quilting machines and love them, but some regret spending the money. Take your time, weigh all your options and don't make a hasty decision you may regret later.
            Bubby I think it you hit this head on. At 69 I have arthritis in my neck from a car accident at 17. If I remain in the same position to long especially bending over looking down it becomes painful. 2 weeks ago I had to go into the ER with muscle spasms generating from my neck and was out of it for about 4 days to recover. The cost of a long arm is so much it is better and easier on me to have them quilted by someone else. I will still do baby quilts on my machine but nothing bigger. And then not all at one time. I even have to change out my beloved Juki portable to a Janome 3128 due to the weight when I go to QOV to sew.
            sigpic my goal is to be as good a person as my dogs already think I am

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              #7
              Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

              I have been looking at the Handy Quilter simply sweet sixteen and the Baby lock Coronet. They are the Same machine. My thought is I would not be pulling and tugging on the machine. I figure with a sit down only machine I would still have to pull around. I also thought about the block rockit but don't want the 10 foot table taking up so much space???? Don't know.

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                #8
                Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                I will have a lot of years ahead of me as I am 43. Yes it is a lot of money. I am trying to justify to myself. I hate being pulled up with to do quilts and just dread them on my Bernina. I get so much pain in my shoulders a beck daily. I want to buy a machine that will last for a long time. Boron ably would not buy another. As my husband says "you don't go to bars!" LOL

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                  #9
                  Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                  I just watched a couple of videos on the Coronet and it looks like a wonderful machine. The price is close to $6,000. I paid ( rather am paying) $5,000 for my Cresendo. If that helps any.
                  🌺 Lorie

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                    #10
                    Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                    I don't have a long-arm, but I have a Juki TL2010Q on a queen sized Grace frame. I bought them because I didn't like quilting on a domestic sewing machine. I also had lots of tension in my neck, shoulders and back. With the frame, I can move the machine instead of the quilt and it's much easier on my neck and shoulders. I stand on a fatigue mat which helps my back, hips and legs. I'm also walking some when I'm rolling the quilt on the frame. I don't have room for a long-arm, but I hope up upgrade to a Q'nique or BlockRockit mid-arm in the future.
                    *~* Myrna *~*
                    *~* Quilters lead pieceful lives *~*

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                      #11
                      Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                      Unless you are going into business, personally I don't think
                      You would quilt enough quilts to pay for the expense of a
                      Long arm machine. I pay $35-50 dollars to have a lap quilt,
                      50 x65 inches quilted. A long arm machine is $5000-8000.
                      Plus they take up a lot of room.
                      I can take a lot of quilts to someone else to quilt for that price.

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                        #12
                        Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                        Originally posted by MRoy View Post
                        I don't have a long-arm, but I have a Juki TL2010Q on a queen sized Grace frame. I bought them because I didn't like quilting on a domestic sewing machine. I also had lots of tension in my neck, shoulders and back. With the frame, I can move the machine instead of the quilt and it's much easier on my neck and shoulders. I stand on a fatigue mat which helps my back, hips and legs. I'm also walking some when I'm rolling the quilt on the frame. I don't have room for a long-arm, but I hope up upgrade to a Q'nique or BlockRockit mid-arm in the future.
                        I had this combination at one time and it worked well. I had to sell it because the area we had it in flooded and it took us a while to find the problem. Also even though it is slim line it takes up a lot of space if you extend it for a queen or king and I did not have the room.
                        sigpic my goal is to be as good a person as my dogs already think I am

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                          #13
                          Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                          I just bought the Baby Lock Tiara III sit down long arm (the same machine as the Sweet 16. I'm told Baby Lock makes it). I find it very easy to use so far. Yes, it is an investment ($4700) show price, but I think for me it's going to be worth it. I want to do QOV and Linus Project quilts, as well as family quilts. I have had four quilts professionally quilted by LA and they turned out beautiful, but DH decided I should have my own machine.
                          A day patched with quilting Seldom unravels Sharon

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                            #14
                            Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                            I have a long arm. It's not fancy but it gets the job done. The way I figure it, quilting is a hobby. I know many people who have fancy wood working shops, big fishing boats, numerous fancy and Expensive cameras that they use for their hobby! These tools cost way more than my longarm did! I think we need to stop figuring out if it will pay for itself and figure out if we are worth it to continue our hobby and finish our quilts without putting undue stress on our bodies to quilt on a domestic machine. Just know, it's a learning curve and you will need to learn your machine and the techniques before you feel completely comfortable quilting on your longarm. But quilting on a longarm is more intuitive than quilting on a domestic, because it is like drawing with a pencil.

                            Good luck with your decision.

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                              #15
                              Re: Should I purchase a long arm?

                              I became enamoured with a HandiQuilter Simply Sixteen with the little foot frame at the recent Quilt Canada. I also tried the HQ Sweet Sixteen sit down. IMHO only, I much prefer the stand up and the little foot frame is adjustable for height. Quilting on the Simply Sixteen is like driving and quilting on the Sweet Sixteen is like FMQ on my domestic Janome.

                              If you have a dealer close by where you can go and play for a couple of hours you might get a good idea of how your body will handle it. Good luck.

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