Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about quilt show classes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Question about quilt show classes

    I'm going to my first quilt show and Mom's flying up to join me! I'm so excited I can hardly think straight and I need to register and pick out our classes. Looking online at the classes I'm confused about the prices. They all have a price listed, say $70, for a full day. But, in the class description it will list class supplies and they all have kits for $35 payable to the teacher. So, the class is really $105. Do I have that right?

    We're going to be there 2 full days but are the full day classes worth all that time? Would anyone suggest spending an entire day in class or would you want to shop and look at all the quilts and demonstrations? There are also lectures and something called Quilt-O that I want to play.

    #2
    Re: Question about quilt show classes

    If you want to buy the kit it's the extra money (or you can make up your own from the supply list). Sometimes it's worth the class. Save time for the show and vendors too.
    SandyWhite
    Ocala, Florida
    http://handpiecing.blogspot.com


    Comment


      #3
      Re: Question about quilt show classes

      I found I learned more visiting vendors. However we did take a couple short classes over the two days. They were fun but if I had to choose, I would skip the classes
      Karen
      Life is short - Live everyday to the fullest

      Comment


        #4
        Re: Question about quilt show classes

        I have been to the Rocky Mountain Quilt Festival the past 3 years. Usually there are free demo's, but you need to sign up for them so they know how many hand-outs to have ready. The classes depend on what you want to learn. You'll want to find out if sewing machines/supplies are provided or if you are expected to bring your own. Most classes require a fee to the teacher in addition to the cost of the class. The Hoffman Challenge items are on display at the RM quilt show, so I allow most of my time to browse all the vendors. You can learn a lot from viewing all the displays & talking to people. I personally wouldn't take an all-day class, unless it was something really special. You can take classes at home from your LQS or watch web tutorials. Have fun! JCY

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Question about quilt show classes

          How Lucky you are to be going with your Mum... It's gonna be a great time for the both of you.. I've not been to any really large shows , but I get excited over going to our local Guild Show in the Fall. I learn so much and enjoy the vendors with their booths and information.
          Judy

          Click HERE to find me and My imagination
          :icon_wave:

          Comment


            #6
            Re: Question about quilt show classes

            I would suggest you only take an all day class if its something you really, really want to learn or a technique you want to try. Otherwise why bother? I agree you can learn a lot from the vendors & from talking to people, I learn a lot just by looking at the quilts on display too. The local guild puts on a show in March & they often have vendors that demonstrate new techniques & gadgets & they do it for free..
            Have fun
            May the road rise up to meet you...
            May the wind be always at your back...
            May you be in Heaven a half hour before the Devil knows you're dead...
            Patt :icon_wave:

            Comment


              #7
              Re: Question about quilt show classes

              I probably would not take an all day class, because I love roaming around, looking at everything.

              There are very few instructors that I would spend money on, anyway... I. Would probably pay go see Mark Lipinski, though... But not all day....unless I had at least one or two more days to explore....


              Sandy from Cincinnati


              AKA Kermit

              Comment


                #8
                Re: Question about quilt show classes

                When I go to quilt shows I don't take classes I love to just walk around and look at all the stuff see the demos and shop. depending on the size of the show it could take 3 or 4 or more passes to see and take in everything. I also never buy on the first couple passes through, as some vendors have the same things at different prices.
                sigpic:icon_hug: Iris Girl = April = fabric, Fabric FABRIC!!
                Time spent with cats is never wasted.
                Sigmund Freud

                Comment


                  #9
                  Re: Question about quilt show classes

                  Thank you all for the pointers. We're going to skip the classes.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Re: Question about quilt show classes

                    My opinion is to take a class, even though you've just said you're not going to. It is usually the funnest part of a quilt show for me if I find one I really like. There are usually nationally recognized quilters teaching at quilt shows, experts in whatever specialty they teach. I meet new friends and always come away with a new technique and a class sample that can often be finished in the class or in a little while at home. It expands my knowledge of my craft. I also always buy the teacher's kit. She knows what she's doing and wants to make the most of your time.

                    I'm a quilt class junkie and love them. I take them every chance I get. There is always something new to learn.
                    Cyndi


                    “Have courage for the great sorrows of life and patience for the small ones; and when you have laboriously accomplished your daily task, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.” - Victor Hugo

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: Question about quilt show classes

                      In October my mother and I went to MQX in Portland. It was awesome. My mom does long-arm quilting for herself and for hire in AK. I mostly do the applique wall hangings (McKenna Ryan, Toni Whitney).

                      Together we perused the class list and she helped me decide what classes to take because she had taken classes from some of the teachers previously and based on what she knew of my abilities or lack thereof, she knew what to recommend.

                      We took a full day class with Jamie Wallen. It was spendy. And there was a class fee in addition to the registration fee. BUT---that class was so worth it. If I had only taken that one class, I would have been happy. Jamie really explained some things and caused me to believe that I could do more than just sew around the edges of the pieces.

                      As a result of the classes I took that weekend, I purchased a Janome 8900 (at a killer price!) and have done fmq (gasp) on a couple of quilts and have gone back and added border quilting to several of my wall hangings.

                      I also took a full day class from Jerry Granata and two half day classes from other teachers.

                      These teachers all gave me the confidence to try something more than straight lines with clear thread. And I am enjoying it. I didn't think I would because when I helped Mom quilt my 50th birthday quilt on her long-arm, I didn't enjoy it and felt incompetent and out of my depth. I still would feel reluctant on a long-arm, but I am gaining confidence with the Janome.

                      So I would recommend taking some classes if there is a teacher/pattern/technique you really want to learn.

                      Plus I had a great visit with my Mom.
                      The trail is the thing----Louis L'Amour

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X