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    Don't Wait for a Rainy Day...

    I just was reading Bonnie Hunter's daily blog. She shared a quote from Robyn Quailes-Dillard, who has been sorting through her MIL's sewing stash because the MIL had to move to assisted living. We probably all have fabrics that are special to us that we're waiting for use. Her comment is, "Don't wait for a rainy day to use that yardage that you've been saving for a special occasion. Every day is a special occasion." This challenges me to get busy & use some of those special fabrics in my stash. I have so many patterns on my bucket list, but I'm slow in getting to them. And even when we get that special quilt made, why is it so difficult to give it away? I still have several finished quilts waiting for just the right person to gift it to.

    #2
    Both of my grandmothers and mother, all kept night gowns and robes for just in case. Never worn, never used, just in case.

    Dad's last Christmas gift to mom was never worn. Still had the tags with the price cut off. I cried and cried when I let it go. It was the last shopping trip I had with my Dad. I think it would have hurt him to know that it hung in her closet for all those years, just being saved for just in case.
    Katrina
    “Nothing can dim the light which shines from within.” Maya Angelou

    Comment


      #3
      Why do you have to give it away? You made it. Its yours to keep if you want. And you can keep as MANY as you want.
      TRUTH is seldom appreciated, unless you happen to agree with it. When you don't agree, you just call it rude.

      Comment


      • Hillbillyhike
        Hillbillyhike commented
        Editing a comment
        I make quilts for others, but also for myself. No shame in that.

      • jjkaiser
        jjkaiser commented
        Editing a comment
        I totally agree. Lots of work goes into making a quilt. Might as well keep some of the pretty ones yourself.

      #4
      I don't quite understand this. Yes my Grandma had a dresser full of new nighties in case she went to the hospital. I get that part. But I have never bought fabric that is so special I didn't want to use it. Am I weird or do most people have stuff in their stash they are saving?

      Comment


      • jjkaiser
        jjkaiser commented
        Editing a comment
        Rachel! Seriously? Stash investment $10,000? I can't even imagine that much fabric!

      • SuzanneOrleansOntario
        SuzanneOrleansOntario commented
        Editing a comment
        I remember Erma Bombeck saying about using your good stuff. That has always stuck with me. If I don't use it, it's more than likely that I don't really like it. I use all fabrics, but sometimes the right pattern or inspiration has to hit me.
        Rachel -- I'm up there with you. In my first few years of quilting, I was probably spending 6-8K year, then less about 3k. That might have included batting, rulers and gadgets, but mostly fabric. Since Covid, I have slowed down my buying and try using what I have. I'm sure the LQS are feeling my absence.
        Jocelyn -- our fabrics are much pricier than US. Nowadays, there are some stores that sell quilt cotton between $22-26. I have found a few LQS that still sell at $17-20, a bargain if they are in clearance bin at half price.

      • KarenC
        KarenC commented
        Editing a comment
        I don't want to try to put a dollar value on my stash. Some I purchased, some I received as a supplement for working at quilt festival, and others inherited. I have a goal to sew up the inherited fabric, but feel a need coming to sew something I purchased in the next month or so. I was happy when my quilting expenses were under $1k during 2020. We'll see if I can keep it that way this year.

      #5
      As the mother of 2 sons I am very cognizant that someday my dil’s will be dealing with all my life’s accumulation. My husband has said he will just shut the door to my sewing room when I die, he will not be disposing of my things. I went through a year of stash building & then I stopped that. I like the challenge of using up what I’ve got. I do allow myself to buy needed pieces to finish projects but feel proud of myself when something comes together from my stash. This week I was tempted to buy backing but pieced it out of an extra block, leftover pieces & one piece of stash fabric.

      Comment


      • SuzanneOrleansOntario
        SuzanneOrleansOntario commented
        Editing a comment
        Wow you are showing restraint. I know that my DH will either keep some fabrics for himself, but offer most to my GF for herself or VQC. My DD & DIL sew, but don't quilt. They may want some of my machines and fabric. BUT God willing, I plan on living past 100.

      #6
      Very good point. There are some fabrics or pre cuts I’ve bought and just can’t bring myself to use. Need to rethink that. When my grandmother passed in 2010 I went through her closets and got rid of her clothes at our church thrift store. I’m not kidding that there were at least 50 totes full of beautiful clothes and I would swear that at least half of them still had the tags. I most definitely don’t want to saddle that kind of chore to my daughter.
      Carlie

      Comment


      • KarenC
        KarenC commented
        Editing a comment
        I know what you mean. After clearing out mom's house after a flood, and watching her just buy more stuff and clothes that she won't wear, I definitely don't want my kids to go through that.

      #7
      When I started quilting, I bought fabric and then more fabric. No specific project in mind. Now I tend to buy for a specific project. I am working on using the stash I had accumulated as I don't have the storage I had when I acquired it.

      It may surprise some of you, but I was married for 23 years. My MIL passed away at 95 years old. I got along with her better than most of the her grandchildren and either of her children. (I didn't argue or try to tell her what to do unless she was endangering herself or someone else.) She had 100+ dresses made in 1972 when my FIL retired. She found a pattern she liked and had them all made from the same pattern, just different fabrics. Some were gingham, some were silk or taffeta, some were fancier than others. She would rotate them from time to time and we'd always be surprised by a different dress.

      When she passed away one of her wishes was her clothes were to be destroyed, she didn't want anyone "Pawing" over them (I understood her feelings on the underclothing) at a sale or a thrift shop. I hated to get rid of the dresses by throwing them away. One of the granddaughters secretaries was a quilter, and she took the dresses and made a different pattern for each of the two children and all the grandchildren. They mean so much to us. We all sat and remembered times Grandmother wore this dress or that dress and we even pulled out the photo albums to find pictures of her in the dresses. So there are options when someone passes, rather than just throwing away or disposing of things that have great memories. The quilt I ended up with is the Missouri Star, and who knew all those years ago I would have an attachment not only to the quilt and memories but to Missouri Star Quilt Company.
      Last edited by BobW; April 6, 2021, 10:17 AM.

      Comment


      • Hillbillyhike
        Hillbillyhike commented
        Editing a comment
        What a lovely story. I bet they are beautiful quilts and memories. Thanks for sharing, Bob.

      • Ruthie734
        Ruthie734 commented
        Editing a comment
        I enjoyed your story. Memory quilts like that are a real treasure. They not only keep your body warm, but they warm the heart every time you see them.

      #8
      That's partly what makes our move a little harder. We surely do not want to take everything with us. that includes fabric, lol.

      Comment


        #9
        When my grandmother received gifts she would put them back in the box and store them in her attic for safekeeping and because they were too good to be used. That mentality must have come from living through the depression where she didn't have much of anything and anything "extra" was put away for a rainy day.
        Michele

        to the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world...

        Comment


        • Hillbillyhike
          Hillbillyhike commented
          Editing a comment
          I just cleaned out my parents ' apartment. Lots of items with tags and saved for rainy day. Too good to use, lol.

        #10
        I have just a couple of fabric pieces that are "special" ..I hope that isn't too bad of me. Over the past couple of years I have been weeding out my stuff, passing some on to folks that need it or donate things. It has been a hard slow process.

        Comment


          #11
          I guess Mom was different, because she was brought up during the Depression, but everything in her closet was used. We donated her clothes to Goodwill, which is what she wanted. I'm sure she bought some things that she only wore once or twice, but not that many.

          She didn't have a "stash" to speak of. All the time I was growing up she would either buy what she needed from the local dry goods store (she was very good at figuring out how much she needed and cutting it just right so there wasn't that much waste), or get it from a sister who would go around to yard sales and buy tons of fabric for pennies on the dollar. The year she made the quilts for each of her children was the only time I can remember that she went around the region to buy a lot of fabric (and the only way I knew that was she gave us a letter describing the journey she took to find what she needed), but I don't know if she had any left.

          The only thing we had from her sewing life was the equipment she used. I have her machine, and Cheryl got a pair of her scissors. My Aunt got the quilt frame she used because it belonged to her grandmother. My sister got a couple of Mom's quilts, but no stash was available.

          Rob
          If you like a fabric, buy a yard. If you LOVE a fabric, buy three!
          Anna Bates
          "Quilt Roadies"

          Comment


            #12
            My late husband bought me fabric to make a quilt one year for Christmas. I have never felt my skills were good enough to sew it. I get it down and look at it and it makes me sad. Maybe someday .

            Comment


            • KarenC
              KarenC commented
              Editing a comment
              I hope one day soon that you will have the confidence to make something with that fabric and think of fond memories of him each time you use it.

            #13
            A girlfriend once remarked of me when we were at an estate sale that I needn't worry about having one because by the time I was ready to get rid of it it was already used up. I took it as a compliment. I figure, If it was good enough for someone else, then it must still be good enough for me. I refuse to go buy more fabric, eventhough that is a lot of fun, because I have lots of ends and pieces that are plenty good enough. I still have the belief that a quilt can be made of leftovers and 40 years ago, I thought that was worn out clothing. Now, not so much....I think I'm rich now that I can use new materials.
            I buy most of my clothing from thrift stores and I admit that when I am gifted something incredibly beautiful I have trouble using it. My DD gave me an Aran sweater two years ago and I only wear it for special occassions. PRobably not a good plan. I only wear cotton nightclothes and preferably Eileen West brand. I wear them until I have mended them so many times that they don't have any recollection of their earlier life. DH just smiles and shakes his head but I am comfortable. I mend his jeans and he remarks that I sure have gotten better at it through the years.
            So, bless all of you that struggle with letting go. It is just who you are. But know that when we pass, nobody really wants our stuff. And if they do, how many familiar family fights have we heard about that the kids fight over who gets what....that is the saddest part I believe.
            Walk in peace with the Lord by your side.
            Terry

            Comment


              #14
              I call this "using the good dishes". Of course fabric is not dishes, but using the phrase from only using the good dishes at holidays. I can't say I am always successful with my fabric though. I am afraid to use my Tula Pink fabrics that I bought right before I got Covid. LOL What if I mess it up. Well, I guess I mess it up.

              Retha

              Comment


              • JCY
                JCY commented
                Editing a comment
                It's been years since I used the "good dishes". They sit in my hutch & look pretty. My china set is one I bought back in the late 1960's from the Speigel catalog. Our "entertaining" days are over to even have an occasion on which to use them. Some of the special dishes are antiques passed down from my mom. I doubt if any of my kids have any interest in any of them.

              #15
              Joy -- I don't like to save stuff for a rainy day. If I bought it, I will use it because I like it, whether it's china or thrift store find. I have some items that were given to me, that I might use on occasion, but if I don't use for a year or so, I will donate it to local thrift store or FB Buy Nothing neighborhood group. I save things that I know I will use, but I don't get attached to <things>. DH on the other hand is more of a challenge. Obviously was raised in poorer days, and likes to keep everything. If he goes first, I will need to plan at least a year to de-clutter and dispose / donate his things.

              Enjoy life and do what makes you happy. Everything else will follow.

              Every day I try to do one thing that challenges my comfort zone.

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