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A Word About Batting

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    A Word About Batting

    If you can tear batting by pulling on it with your hands, it will tear after it is quilted. Stitching acts as a perforating factor. I always thought my Grandmother didn't like people sitting on her beds because it would mess up the bed. Actually, she realized that sitting on a quilt would pull the batting away from the stitching causing the batting to make lumps in the quilt. Pulling a quilt up over your body will do the same thing. I work too hard piecing my quilts to take a chance on the batting causing lumps or thin places in the quilt where it has come apart. Please, before you use a batting in your quilt, try tearing it apart with your hands. If you can tear it, reconsider using it. Many longarm quilters use batting that tears easily. Try the tear test on their batting before allowing them to quilt for you.

    #2
    Interesting. Never thought of this but I will try it. I am always pulling and tugging quilts up when I go to bed, now that will be a hard habit to break but I haven't noticed any thinning or bunching of the quilts around the edges. So far!!

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      #3
      Adequate quilting will not allow that to happen. If you aren't close enough or the top is not flat as sandwiched, or the batt is stretched tight when sandwiched, all bets are off. `To reduce the "tearing" select a batt with scrim. Some quilters don't like using a batt with scrim. Poor quality batting will stretch and tear easily, and thickness throughout will be affected. If you aren't happy with the batt supplied by the quilter, bring your own.

      Also janbee, in your grandmothers day the quilts were probably not machine stitched or "longarmed," so stiching density was probably less than desired.
      You gots to risk it to gets the biscuit-

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      • janbee
        janbee commented
        Editing a comment
        Not to argue, but I am a longarm quilter. Batting with scrim will tear and come apart. Hobbs 80/20 tears easily and will come apart over time and use. Many quilters have never pulled on the batting they are using and are surprised when they see how easily it will tear and come apart. I show this in the quilting classes I teach. I show several different brands of batting so that they can tell which batting will tear apart and which brands will not. All batting has directions of how far apart it should be quilted. It really does not make a difference if batting is quilted closely or not. Stitching acts as a perforation for batting that tears easily. My grandmother was an excellent hand quilter and she got cotton from the gin and combed it into bats which of course was the only method available at the time.

      #4
      Most of the batting sold today also has scrim, which allows it not to be torn.
      K is for Karen 😊​..................
      Cremation - My last hope for a smokin' hot body.


      Before you speak,
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      • janbee
        janbee commented
        Editing a comment
        Not to argue but batting with scrim will tear. If you don't believe me, try pulling on a piece of Hobbs 80/20.

      #5
      Except hand quilters deliberately buy batting without scrim.

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      • K. McEuen
        K. McEuen commented
        Editing a comment
        Not all of them. When I hand quilted I used Warm & Natural or Warm & White. They have scrim and I had no isues quilting them

      #6
      Am interested to know which batting you recommend. There are so many types brands these days in the world.
      Am of the opinion everything has an limit, if keep within the safe working loads ect. failure will not occur prematurely.
      Edit to add more info
      pulling at batting on own will prematurely make it fail
      fabric on top and bottom does add strength, sure there is stitching through but that makes pockets to retain heat,
      Most probably a calculation somewhere that can calculate the failure of a quilt with the variables, but life's to short, and much quilting to be done,
      I do not expect the quilt to last more than needed.
      The oldest quilt that I know of, is in York UK, made 1718 Coverlet, a few years back now was on show at the festival of quilts before being put away for 10 years. The link shows the book, all about it. wonder what batting was used.
      certainly a subject not really thought about, thank you for bringing to attention.
      Last edited by 201 Treadler; April 22, 2020, 12:59 PM. Reason: added more info

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