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Cookies! Oatmeal and Sugar.

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    Cookies! Oatmeal and Sugar.

    As promised, here are the two cookie recipes I am making today. The recipe for the sugar cookies is from my grandmother who got it from her sister-in-law's mother, so the recipe is well over 100 years old (my grandmother was born in 1909). Be sure when making these you take them out of the oven when they start showing just a hint of brown (as on the photo) on the edges. When my grandmother made them and they got too “dark” she called them culls and would not serve them to company. Grandpa said, “all the more for me!” The oatmeal cookie recipe, as you can see, is from Trisha Yearwood. I've made it and they are very good, crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside.

    Enjoy!
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    Carlie

    #2
    Carlie, I make your sugar cookies all the time. Mine are called Amish sugar cookies. They are so incredibly light and they make a good amount.
    sigpicwww.whisperofrose.blogspot.com


    Scottie Mom Barb

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    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      They are very light and just fall apart and melt in your mouth . One of may husbands favorite. The other is my grandmother’s roll out cookies. My aunt was from western Minnesota. My grandma’s recipe just noted that the recipe was from her sister-in-law's mother.
      Last edited by CarlieBlilie; October 6, 2020, 03:30 PM.

    #3
    Thank You! I've been trying to stay away from sweets, but sometimes.....you just need cookies!
    cookie-monster-emoji.jpg
    🌺 Lorie

    Comment


    • Bubby
      Bubby commented
      Editing a comment
      Sometimes nothing will do but a homemade cookie.

    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      I’m trying to stay away from sweets too. I do prefer homemade but my favorite are the chocolate chip cookies I make. Didn’t make them. Too tempting.

    #4
    Stay away from temptation? Exactly how does that work?

    Rob
    There's nothing more directly linked to who we are than the fabric that we make.
    --Ken Burns

    Comment


    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      I put the cookies in the freezer and since I don't see them I don't think about them. We but butterbraids from my two granddaughters as a fundraiser for them. I usually buy 4. I think I have about 12 downstairs in the freezer. I just don't think about them. It works for me anyway.

    • auntstuff
      auntstuff commented
      Editing a comment
      Not well, Rob. Not well at all....

    #5
    Thanks for the recipes! Sugar cookies are my all time favorite. I could eat a double recipe all by myself. But I like em with a thin coat of icing. We make them with grandkids at Christmas and I always hide a dozen away for myself cause they put so many dang jimmies, gummy bears, red hots, and colored sugars on them!

    Comment


    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      These won’t work for that. They are so fragile that trying to put icing on will probably break them. I have a different recipe that I use for the icing/decorated cookies.

    #6
    Carlie, I also have been making these for years. But they are, to me, like potato chips. No way I can eat just one and walk away.

    Comment


    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      Exactly! These and the rollout Christmas cookies I make are just exactly like that. I remember the first time I made the rollout cookies after Dave and I married. We were having a cookie exchange at work. I needed to make 12 dozen cookies. My recipe actually made 15 dozen. I was very pleased. I made them on a Friday night if I remember correctly. By Monday morning I believe I only had 6 dozen left. My husband will actually take 12 at a time. I love them too but I have never taken that many at a time. And he was the culprit that day, I did not eat many because I needed them for work. That is the reason they go in the freezer because he doesn't take as many and then they last longer. I ended up making another batch for work. Oh the memories!!

    #7
    Yumm!! Thanks for sharing those recipes Carlie! I have a favourite rolled out sugar cookie recipe as well, but those melty ones sound good!! I will have to try them. Could margarine be substituted for butter do you think?
    Rainy days are for quilting. Thank goodness I live in a rainforest! 😁

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    • Hillbillyhike
      Hillbillyhike commented
      Editing a comment
      Sorry...I meant could butter be substituted for margarine in her recipe. I always use unsalted butter and agree with you Rob...and Julia. Ahhh...Julia. No one beats her! I do think it would alter Carlie's recipe, in flavour for sure. Maybe texture? I don't use margarine any longer as I believe anything hydrogenated isn't good for you.

    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      Hike, yes it does change the cookie. I've tried it with the unsalted butter as I do not use margarine for the most part. I only keep it for these cookies. I didn't care for the way they tasted using the butter. Not sure why there would be such a difference but there is. Sometimes substitutions just don't work. For example, my daughter used butter flavored shortening for the rollouts (should be just regular shortening) and they just didn't taste right. Maybe they taste "off" just because I'm used to the original way. These sugar cookies come out quite light and they are fragile. Maybe you could say crumbly, they just break apart very easily which is the attraction, I think, of these cookies.

    • Hillbillyhike
      Hillbillyhike commented
      Editing a comment
      What brand of margarine do you use Carlie? I do want to make them like the original recipe first. My mama amd aunt used margarine and you're right, it's what flavours we are used to as well. Our memories want that sometimes. Except for my mama's mushed kale. My memories and taste buds want no part of that!! 😂

    #8
    I use Blue Bonnet. I do not remember what my grandpa bought. My grandpa bought all the groceries. Grandma never ever went grocery shopping. Isn’t that funny!
    Carlie

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    • Hillbillyhike
      Hillbillyhike commented
      Editing a comment
      That is funny! My Papa would never have done any "woman's work". That included pushing my baby buggy. Lol. Funny, because I was norn in the 60's and my mama was pretty hip. We don't have Blue Bonnet here, and I can't cross the line right now. I'm sure I can find a good substitute...whenever I get around to making them.

    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      I am a little older, born in 54 but I was around my mom's parents all the time as they lived just across the street from us. Learned to crochet, embroider and bake from my grandma. Mom was definitely not a homemaker. My grandfather was very old fashioned, although my grandmother did work some (her only jobs were for people who requested her to come and work for them) my grandfather never took a penny of her money for household things, he paid for everything. Grandma used her money for her own clothes and probably fabric for clothing as she made a lot of my dresses for school and dances. Oh, and Christmas gifts. If she ran out of money she would borrow from Grandpa and pay him back.

      As far as a substitute I think any margarine will work just fine.

    #9
    Actually I was very surprised when I read your sugar cookie recipe seeing it had margarine in it. I didn't know margarine was even around back then! None of my Grandma's recipes called for margarine, usually lard or butter. Then I remembered why that could be. I live in Wisconsin, the Dairy State. It was illegal (until I'm not sure when 1980-ish?) for grocery stores to sell margarine in Wisconsin. When I was a kid sometimes our neighbor would drive across the state line to Illinois to get it where it was legal. We called it bootleg butter.

    Comment


    • MSN
      MSN commented
      Editing a comment
      I grew up in Minnesota. For years, it was illegal to sell colored margarine. All you could buy was a 1-lb. bag of uncolored margarine. There was an orange color pellet that you would have to break and then knead the pouch until the color was distributed throughout. One of my dad's co-workers was from Iowa, and brought back a case of stick margarine. I remember my dad and I going over to his co-workers house one night after dark. We parked in the alley, next to his car. After checking to make sure no one was looking, we opened both trunks and transferred the margarine from his car to ours. It was like a drug deal.

    • Hillbillyhike
      Hillbillyhike commented
      Editing a comment
      I grew up on margarine. It blows my mind that it was illegal in places..and up to 1980! Wow

    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      I remember those days very well. We always froze our margarine in those bags and when it had to be squeezed to release the color we girls would fight over who got to do it. There were 4 of us total but I think we were getting stick margarine by the time the youngest was old enough to do it. Isn't it silly to think that that was something we would fight over who would get to do that?

    #10
    Your sugar cookie recipe is almost identical to ours except ours calls for "Spry" and butter instead of oil and butter. The second is what we call. " Pride of Iowa" cookies. I love them but DH detects the coconut no matter how hard I try to convince him it's all oatmeal. Both are fantastic cookies.
    “What we do for ourselves dies with us. What we do for others and the world, is and remains immortal.”

    ― Albert Pine

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    • CarlieBlilie
      CarlieBlilie commented
      Editing a comment
      I have been trying to find a good oatmeal cookie for a while. The ones from my mother are too soft. My husband likes them crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside. These truly fit the bill.
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