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    Foreign Language

    Have any of you taught English to a non-English speaking person?

    A Polish woman I work with has asked me to help her learn some basic English. She is not worried about being a fluent speaker, just a basic understanding. I agreed and in exchange, she will help me learn Polish. Our mutual language is Icelandic.

    My question is, where do I start with what to teach her? I know I can find some things online to print but I just am wondering where to start.

    Input??

    #2
    Re: Foreign Language

    I'd start with phrases that you commonly need. Back in the dark ages when the Spanish teacher came twice a week to my classroom she started with the weather, and those nicety phrases- How are you? I hope you're well? It's sunny today, or It's going to rain. etc.
    Katrina


    “Nothing can dim the light which shines from within.”
    ― Maya Angelou

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      #3
      Re: Foreign Language

      Start with the basics. Where is my phone? Here is my phone. What time is it? My name is Carol. What is your name? Do you want a glass of wine? Do you have identification? Does the bus stop here? The post office is on the next street.
      Take a walk, point out things and make statements. This is my car. Those are birds. The trash cans go at the curb. That lady is pregnant.

      Use hand gestures, lots of facial expression and make it fun.
      :icon_happy:


      sigpic

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        #4
        Re: Foreign Language

        When I was working at one hotel a lot of Japanese tour groups would be bused over to go to the buffets. You needed to learn to answer to 'where is the restroom'. That's pretty universal. lol

        It sounds kind of fun and I hope you keep us updated on how it's going.
        🌺 Lorie

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          #5
          Re: Foreign Language

          I agree ^.
          I did a mission trip several years ago teaching English to Russian and Romanian speakers. We taught mostly phrases and then advanced to actual conversational words, then to Bible verses as it was a mission trip. I had the advanced English class so they already knew enough to say their name, their work/school level, some basics. So I would go with those concepts- your name, your life activities you want to share with a new aquaintance, your basic questions. My name, your name, I work __, Where is the bathroom, how much, etc.

          Once you get past those I would go with common items like car, door, window, maybe colors, numbers, common terms- boy, girl, dog, cat, etc.

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            #6
            Re: Foreign Language

            Thanks. I thought about using my beginning Icelandic workbook (which starts with the above stuff) and just substitute English for Icelandic.

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              #7
              Re: Foreign Language

              If you cam still find them, childrens basic readers are a big help.
              TRUTH is seldom appreciated, unless you happen to agree with it. When you don't agree, you just call it rude.

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                #8
                Re: Foreign Language

                Good for you and what a fun project!! I have to admit I am so ignorant, I did not even know Icelandic was a language! Does that mean you are from Iceland?? Is it always freezing cold there or is that a myth??

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                  #9
                  Re: Foreign Language

                  I've found phrases will come naturally in time. Learning names of items/actions is the easiest way to start. Sit, go, stay. Like in the grocery store ... if you want to find out where something is all you have to really say is the item or action. Bread? milk? cereal? The "Where is" is usually implied and will easily come in time along with "This is ..." "That is a ..." Numbers will be important, too.

                  Sentence structure is a challenge. We have so many verb tenses that they really don't in Polish. Stick to simple future "will" and past "went. " A sentence like "It's going to rain" is simply "It will rain." or "Rain tomorrow."

                  We lived in the top floor of a 2-flat. From 1st to 3rd grade I did my reading and writing homework downstairs at my grandma & grandpa's house. I never realized until much later that they were learning along with me. Unfortunately it never really worked out to where I was really taught Polish or Ukranian. Their education ended when we moved. They never did get past the broken English stage but did learn enough to get along. Hope that helps.
                  Last edited by Judy, USMC; June 22nd, 2018, 06:51 PM.

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                    #10
                    Re: Foreign Language

                    Originally posted by jjkaiser View Post
                    Good for you and what a fun project!! I have to admit I am so ignorant, I did not even know Icelandic was a language! Does that mean you are from Iceland?? Is it always freezing cold there or is that a myth??
                    It has been a virtually unchanged language for almost 1000 years. Most of the sagas from the first days can still be read by speakers of Icelandic. I am from the US but moved here 11 years ago, so I have learned the language. And, it is a myth. It is not always cold here. Quite nice actually, especially in the summer. We can get a lot of snow and have a short (this year nonexistent) summer. I love it here. No mosquitos, no humidity, no nasty spiders and no snakes.

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