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  • KarenC
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    While I don't run to the doctor right away when feeling under the weather, I am faithful about my annual GYN exams, mammos, and physicals. I currently have good insurance that pays 100% for these preventive measures, and dentist 3 times/yr. These routine exams (and suggested colonoscopy) helped me detect some things I may not have otherwise (high cholesterol, pollups, fibrous-cystic breasts, etc.). I try to eat healthy, but am not always great about it. Will I continue this so faithfully, once I am retired and don't have as good of an insurance policy? I don't know the answer to that question. Meanwhile, I am thankful and blessed to be in basically good health.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Health exam question

    As JCY said, many symptoms are silent. I didn't go to the doctor, until I had a odd pain in my side. I had a tumor the size of a football on my right ovary in my early 30's. Pap smear could have caught it. I'd rather have been inconvenienced by an annual appointment & the brief moments of discomfort during the exam than major invasive surgery, hospitalization, chemo, ER visits, meds, bills, dealing with disability, insurance and on and on. Luckily I can say live and learn.
    So, if you are able, I would say go to your doctor, and be your own best health advocate.
    But I still loathe the dentist.

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  • Cokie
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I will agree with Joy on this one. For years, we did not have insurance or had minimal insurance and only went to the doctor or dentist when we had an illness. Now I have good insurance, and most of my regular check-ups are covered at 100% - yearly physical exam, pap, mammogram, bone density, routine bloodwork, immunizations/vaccines (such as flu shots), dental exam every 6 months, annual eye exam - maybe a couple of other things. I have some minor health issues that are monitored at that exam and in between when needed. I avoided going to the doctor for years, and I have a great fear of the dentist, but I make myself go because in the long run, it's better to do the preventive care. And, there are some health conditions that run in my family that I like to keep tabs on, in case I would develop any of those. I am fortunate to have a great doctor and a couple of specialists that I see as needed, and I have faith in them and how they work with me to manage my health.

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  • cashs mom
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    Originally posted by Vonnie View Post
    My mother died at a very young age of uterine cancer. Before she was diagnosed, no one in our extended family had any major health problems. After my mothers diagnosis all our female relatives of a certain age had checkups. Two had breast cancer and another three had to have hysterectomy's. My mother's tragedy actually saved their lives because they caught it in the early stages. Scary. This was 50 years ago. One of those relatives just passed away, she was in her ninety's.

    As much as I don't like to get poked and prodded, I get the checkups when recommended. If my mother had, she might still be alive. She was younger than the aunt who just passed away. Mom was only 36.
    I agree, Vonnie. I've lost several friends to cancer. In most cases, had they talked to their doctors at regular checkups it might have been caught earlier. The signs are often different than what you might think so waiting "until you feel bad" is often too late.

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  • Midge
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    As a retired advanced practice nurse I guess I really have no excuse for not adhering to guidelines, but I confess I don't always do the exams. At 69 I am healthier since I lost weight, I exercise regularly and have always had great blood pressure. When I gained weight my blood sugar rose a bit, but it's back down now, so no medical measures needed.

    Screening tests are not necessarily hard and fast rules one size fits all. It depends on your risk factors and medical history and are based on research. There is a tremendous amount of money wasted on screening tests for rare events in individuals with no risk factors. I try not to do that.

    For example, the pap smear. Judging by what others have written some of you might not be aware of current guidelines. Here is a link to the standards - American Cancer Society guidelines. I would encourage you to think these through and how they apply to you. Print them out and take them to your next appointment. Why pay for nothing and go through that with no basis in science?

    http://www.cancer.org/cancer/news/ne...ervical-cancer

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  • QuiltingRN
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I go for yearly checkup but I have some medical conditions. I just need follow up with specialists. Recently I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis so another specialist! I don't go very often for simple things!

    I am a 59 year old nurse so I do all the regular checkups.
    I also do dental cleaning/checkups every 6 months. DIL is a dental assistant so she makes sure I go!
    Last edited by QuiltingRN; November 7, 2016, 08:30 PM.

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  • JCY
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I'm a 74 y.o. retired nurse, so yes, I get regular check-ups. I think everyone should...

    1) Get an annual physical with the necessary lab tests -- other check-ups as needed
    2) Dental cleanings & checks every 6 mos.
    3) Vision exams yearly
    4) Both men & women should do self breast exams (Yes, men do get breast cancer as well as women!)
    5) Baseline colonoscopy at age 50, then as recommended
    6) Annual mammograms for women
    7) Annual pelvic exams for women
    8) Skin checks by a dermatologist annually -- esp. if you live at a higher altitude where the skin cancer rate is higher. All those lovely tans we wanted to have when we were younger come back to bite you in your older years.

    Many symptoms are "silent". As was mentioned, one may not realize they have high B/P or high glucose readings. The rate of pre-diabetes & diabetes is sky rocketing. Both hypertension & diabetes are risk factors for stroke & heart disease. No matter how healthy your lifestyle, you still need to have regular check-ups.

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  • Navy Wife
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I'm just the opposite of most of you. I go for a check up once a year. I got used to that while DH was in the Navy. I don't need the yearly female exam since I had a hysterectomy 20 years ago. I have had colonoscopies every 10 years. The last one was a few months ago. Dr. said I'll see you in 10 years. I laughed and told him I would be 89 by then, and I was not planning to waste time on a routine exam. I have mammograms every year. My mother and father both died earlier than necessary because they put off regular exams. I intend to live a long, long time! I have many quilts to make!

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  • Bubby
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    My philosophy is that I want this phase of my life (65+) to be as organic as possible. I have discussed this with my physician and he seems to trust my judgment and he supports me. I'm diabetic, but I control it by eating well and keeping active. I also have other autoimmune issues that I see the doctors for when necessary. I have an annual mammogram only because I have a history of benign breast lumps.

    I eat right, get a LOT of exercise, drink lots of water, get plenty of sleep, have never smoked and I don't like alcohol or coffee. I do get regular A1C tests for the diabetes and take care of my teeth.

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  • Carlie Wolf
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    As a general rule I've always only gone to the doctor on an as needed basis. I was pretty good about pap smears during my child bearing years. I'm almost 69 and I take no meds, aspirin type products rarely although I do take Melatonin as a sleep aid occasionally. When I came here 4 years ago I was under mega stress with elevated blood pressure so I was put on BP meds. That went ok the first two years and then I discovered, in order to get the meds, I suddenly had to have "the annual" every 6 months. If you don't go every 6 months then you don't get the meds and also you then are considered to no longer be the doctors patient and have to do the whole total first patient BS. Since my BP was now down because the stressors are gone I took myself off the BP and I only go to a doctor on an as needed basis again. There is a clinic at the hospital I can go to for emergencies so that's fine with me.

    I never liked going to doctors and I certainly don't have the extra dollars laying around for appointments I don't really need. :-)

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  • CraftyJnet
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I just postponed my obgyn appt. I'm a big person and the gowns are too small and the whole experience is unpleasant. I am curious if other countries mandate yearly testing, even after a "certain age."

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  • Hulamoon
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    I don't go to annuals either. One of the reasons is my primary doc's meddling. My dh and I both see her. I went one time and she asked if he was still surfing and I said I'm sure he is, but we are separated. I talk to him awhile later and found she complains to him that I don't come in and it's hurting her quota or losing patients. Next time I go in I said I told you we were separated and you have no right to talk about me to him. She apologized, but that whole thing turned me off.

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  • quiltingaway
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    Originally posted by Vonnie View Post
    My mother died at a very young age of uterine cancer. Before she was diagnosed, no one in our extended family had any major health problems. After my mothers diagnosis all our female relatives of a certain age had checkups. Two had breast cancer and another three had to have hysterectomy's. My mother's tragedy actually saved their lives because they caught it in the early stages. Scary. This was 50 years ago. One of those relatives just passed away, she was in her ninety's.

    As much as I don't like to get poked and prodded, I get the checkups when recommended. If my mother had, she might still be alive. She was younger than the aunt who just passed away. Mom was only 36.
    And this is why I go for a yearly check up. I know too many people recently that died way before their time and they all had a fear of doctors and hated going. I'm so thankful my Mom was a nurse and I feel totally comfortable in a medical environment. Even though it can be a pain to go and schedule appts. I'd rather be on the preventative side.

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  • auntiemern
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    Unfortunately, due to many health issues, I see several docs. Rheumatologist, (arthritis, lupus, fibro). Pulmanologist ( lung cancer, copd) Dermatologist (bulous lupus, skin issues). Then I have my primary, who treats me for everything else.
    So to your question, I thoroughly believe in preventative, and early screening tests. I know to many loved ones that didn't get 'little' things checked out until it was to late. Because of my medical history the proper tests were done, and my cancer was found in its very early stage. Go get your routine testing done. You can't 'feel' diabetes, or high blood pressure. By the time you do feel something, it could be really bad.
    Wasn't it Benjamin Franklin that said " an ounce of prevention, is worth a pound of cure" Wise advice. Serious medical issues cost much more, than having annual tests and check ups.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vonnie
    replied
    Re: Health exam question

    My mother died at a very young age of uterine cancer. Before she was diagnosed, no one in our extended family had any major health problems. After my mothers diagnosis all our female relatives of a certain age had checkups. Two had breast cancer and another three had to have hysterectomy's. My mother's tragedy actually saved their lives because they caught it in the early stages. Scary. This was 50 years ago. One of those relatives just passed away, she was in her ninety's.

    As much as I don't like to get poked and prodded, I get the checkups when recommended. If my mother had, she might still be alive. She was younger than the aunt who just passed away. Mom was only 36.

    Leave a comment:

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