Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

This Wild and Wonderful World of Ours! 🐜

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    This Wild and Wonderful World of Ours! 🐜

    Introducing.......The Panda Ant!


    The Panda Ant forms a rather surprising species of insect and actually is not even an ant. This actually represents a variety of wingless wasp.


    7A249C2B-F7E4-4EAF-804F-5740BFFED710.jpeg

    Their name derives from the obvious resemblance to a panda in its markings and they were first discovered in 1938. We still know very little about this species. They appear to only to exist in coastal regions of Chile, in South America. Interestingly, their sting also remains exceptionally powerful for their size. They have even brought down animals as large as cows with only a few dozen stings.

    The difference in both appearance and behavior remains so pronounced that the two sexes are often mistaken for entirely separate species. Indeed, the male often grows several times larger than the female and may attain a length of roughly 0.3 in (less than a cm).

    Additionally, the panda ant males have wings while the females are wingless. The males are nocturnal while the females are typically active during the day. The Panda Ant feeds primarily on nectar from a variety of plants. After mating, the female cunningly seeks the nest of a ground-dwelling insect, such as a bee or wasp. There she deposits her eggs. When they hatch, they will feed upon the larva present. How parasitic!

    It is considered as one of the nearly extinct species in the world, however, it lays approximately 2000 eggs in a year. Though a considerable amount of eggs to sustain their survival, unfortunately they are prone to predators that eat a good number of the young panda ants after they hatch due to their bright colors. In case these ants survive, they are to live to the ripe old age of 2 years, which is to a certain extent old for an insect as small as an ant.
    💫 Star lover

    #2
    How interesting, especially since I thought females were usually larger in the insect world. I thought you were going to say it's in the spider family!

    You find the most unusual factoids!
    Vonnie

    Comment


      #3
      Yes, I agree. Very interesting. I always enjoy your posts.

      Comment


        #4
        I'm laughing at myself! I've had one horsefly buzzing me most of today and I've been trying to swat him down. So I get to the forum and thought (now that it wasn't moving) I had him. Swatted the computer screen with a rolled up newspaper ... and when it looked like the body was stuck to the screen ... grabbed a kleenex to wipe it off. Took a few seconds to realize you fooled me!

        Interesting factoid and funny looking critter.

        Comment


        • Star lover
          Star lover commented
          Editing a comment
          Now you have me laughing.....quite the visual you gave me!
      Working...
      X