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DeniseSm
June 27th, 2019, 05:58 PM
I'm going in for my third colonoscopy on Monday. I checked with my insurance and the assigned anesthesia doctor was not in network. I went to the outpatient office to see what my options were and was told I could switch to sedation from anesthesia.

Anybody done this? How did it go?

pcbatiks
June 27th, 2019, 08:54 PM
My dad did that once without being knocked out. He figured it would be him, the dr & maybe one other person in the room. He was wrong. He said there were more people than we wanted in the room so he was embarrassed and uncomfortable. He never did it that way again!

Can you request another anesthesia dr? Insurance is a dirty word.

SuzanneOrleansOntario
June 27th, 2019, 09:11 PM
My ex frequently had it done with sedation. No issues, except worst than man cold. I'm certain it would be ok, but ask.

DeniseSm
June 27th, 2019, 11:20 PM
Can you request another anesthesia dr? Insurance is a dirty word.

The in network doctor in an in network facility has a contract to use a specific union of anesthesiologists. The insurance company says that entire group of anesthesiologists is not in the network. The in network facility will not allow an in network anesthesiologist
to come in , and I completely understand their position. You don't break up the work harmony because one single patient with crappy insurance will be inconvenienced.

I knew I had crappy insurance and frequently have problems with the anesthesiologist being "out of network" It beats having no insurance. At least this procedure I have the option of not having an anesthesiologist. I just wanted to know what to expect.

I hope I don't cry. The nurse says they will give me a sedative.

minipinlady
June 28th, 2019, 02:08 AM
My aunt had it done 2 weeks ago. The sedative seemed to have been blocked or not given. It was a nightmare for her. Be sure the sedative is working Before they start. Hope yours goes very well.

MSN
June 28th, 2019, 03:53 AM
What exactly do you mean by sedation? I have had several procedures done with conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, and it was a breeze. However, conscious sedation requires a specially trained health care professional to administer and monitor. Typically, that would be done by a nurse anesthetist. Are you talking IV or oral sedation?

Monique
June 28th, 2019, 06:23 AM
I have always been put to sleep for mine but that is here in Canada. I would not want it any other way.

DeniseSm
June 28th, 2019, 08:24 AM
What exactly do you mean by sedation? I have had several procedures done with conscious sedation rather than general anesthesia, and it was a breeze. However, conscious sedation requires a specially trained health care professional to administer and monitor. Typically, that would be done by a nurse anesthetist. Are you talking IV or oral sedation?

I don't know for sure. I am not allowed anything by mouth other than the preparation solution, so I am assuming it would be an IV sedative. Thanks for the information that the sedative would typically be from a nurse anesthetist. Since Blue Cross Blue Shield said the group of anesthetists was "out of network" doesn't that mean the nurse anesthetist would be out of network too? Do I need to do this without even a sedative to avoid being stuck with the full "out of network" costs?

Insurance is such a nightmare. Insurance knows and make the rules. I never find out until I get a surprise bill after the fact.

JCY
June 28th, 2019, 09:15 AM
I've always had "conscious sedation" with my colonoscopies. No anesthesiologist. The medication is given IV either by the nurse under the doctor's supervision, or by the dr. & just makes you sleepy & relaxed. It mostly puts you "out" & you don't feel anything. You'll wake up & be surprised the procedure is over. Make sure you have someone to drive you to & from the procedure. You may not remember what the dr. said after your procedure, so it's important to have someone with you. Good luck!

Claire Hallman
June 28th, 2019, 10:10 AM
It seems like the same thing to me, anesthesia and sedation, they would have to explain it better to me. I have had several but was out each time. I would want to be out.
I also have had a d&c with a spinal block since I had eaten, would not want to do that again. I was so relaxed/nervous I said some really stupid things and still am embarrassed.

TMP
June 28th, 2019, 11:34 AM
Can you call your insurance company and talk to them about where you might have the procedure done that you can have anesthesia ? My husband had this procedure done with and without anesthesia . When he had the procedure done with anesthesia the worst part for him was the prep before.

DeniseSm
June 28th, 2019, 01:30 PM
Can you call your insurance company and talk to them about where you might have the procedure done that you can have anesthesia ?

That is a great idea. If I had more time I could probably get a better solution worked out. I just got put on the schedule this Tuesday (I suspect someone canceled and I am getting their slot) and it took me until Thursday morning to figure out the anesthesiologist group was "out of network" Colonoscopy is scheduled for Monday.

I will live and learn and be better prepared for next time. Sadly I have to do this every every three years. Early detection is the key to colon cancer survival.

Vonnie
June 28th, 2019, 01:31 PM
I have never had it done with anesthesia. It's more like a memory blocker. You don't remember anything. Its good to have someone with you to talk with the doctor and remember what was said. I usually become aware half way home. But, the funny part is you might ask several times what the doctor said because you forget. Last time my blood pressure was a little high so they cut down on the dose. I became aware halfway through the procedure. It was like watching the Discovery Channel. Very interesting.

I'm more afraid of what the anesthesia does. I had a very bad experience once when I was trying to wake up. It literally felt like I was climbing out of something.

chelea
June 28th, 2019, 02:25 PM
Now there is "virtual" colonoscopy option called Cologuard for those with average risk of colon cancer. You collect a specimen at home with a kit and mail it with the supplies provided. I did it and it was a breeze. It's not for everyone but it's worth discussing with your physician.

Jean Sewing Machine
June 28th, 2019, 02:28 PM
My first one was sedation, there was a little discomfort, but it was over quickly. But the "take a little nappy" method is the way to go, if it works out for you. Good luck!

Suzette
June 28th, 2019, 03:04 PM
My brother-in-law has to have colonoscopies much more often than most since colon cancer runs in his family. He is always sedated, but not put out. He has never had an issue. He even watches the procedure on the monitor.

Squeaky
June 28th, 2019, 05:16 PM
I've always done it with sedation, but if you want you can ask for "extra" sedation, and it's basically the same as being knocked out. I can remember the distinct point of watching her add it to my IV and then ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ.

KarenC
June 28th, 2019, 08:29 PM
Denise, don't think it's just because you have crappy insurance. I have good insurance, and every time I have had surgery with in network doctors, at in network facilities, the anesthesiologists were always out of network. I had just convinced that in network anesthesiologists didn't exist. I didn't realize there was an option to use a local sedative. I guess I should ask more questions.

MSN
June 29th, 2019, 01:51 AM
I don't know for sure. I am not allowed anything by mouth other than the preparation solution, so I am assuming it would be an IV sedative. Thanks for the information that the sedative would typically be from a nurse anesthetist. Since Blue Cross Blue Shield said the group of anesthetists was "out of network" doesn't that mean the nurse anesthetist would be out of network too? Do I need to do this without even a sedative to avoid being stuck with the full "out of network" costs?

Insurance is such a nightmare. Insurance knows and make the rules. I never find out until I get a surprise bill after the fact.

Even if you are not allowed anything by mouth, you could still be given a pill to take with just enough water to get the pill down. And I agree with you about insurance being a nightmare. Insurance companies have such control over our health care. It's almost a full-time job just to understand what your coverage is and what hoops you have to jump through in order to be covered.

MSN
June 29th, 2019, 01:54 AM
It seems like the same thing to me, anesthesia and sedation, they would have to explain it better to me. I have had several but was out each time. I would want to be out.
I also have had a d&c with a spinal block since I had eaten, would not want to do that again. I was so relaxed/nervous I said some really stupid things and still am embarrassed.

Oh, Claire, please don't be embarrassed. Trust me, those health care professionals have heard worse things than whatever it was you blurted out. At the worst, you entertained them. :lol:

laura44
June 29th, 2019, 02:27 AM
My husband has had it done twice, both times he watched it on the
monitor. He felt fine during and after.

SallyO'Sews
June 29th, 2019, 05:14 PM
I've had several colonoscopies, due to a history of colorectal cancer. (Warning - possible TMI ahead!)

The first one was under sedation. No problem, no pain - that's when they found the tumor, but I was unaware of it until I came around after the procedure.

After that, I've had to be knocked out, because the surgery they did to remove the portion of my colon that contained the tumor & surrounding lymph nodes means that (for lack of a more delicate way to express it) my GPS has had to be re-routed. No problem with the anesthesia, either.

The worst of it is the prep - and that part remains the same, unfortunately!

nativetexan
June 30th, 2019, 03:06 PM
I had one years ago without and was fine. then sometime later happened to tell my Sister that and she had one. boy was she mad at me!! her's hurt her!! I've only had one since but with anesthesia. Didn't know they would do without.

201 Treadler
June 30th, 2019, 07:52 PM
fingers are crossed for a great outcome tomorrow for you
good luck

Squeaky
July 1st, 2019, 11:24 AM
The worst of it is the prep - and that part remains the same, unfortunately!

The prep and the aftermath gas and bloating, but I've learned along the way.

Sharing for anyone that might benefit:

1) Start weaning down to a liquid and soft food diiet 3 or 4 days before you do the prep. Less to clear out means it'll be easier to know you've gotten it all.

2) If your prep is the clear salty liquid (mix powder with water, drink at prescribed intervals) - make sure you do not flavor the entire jug. Doctors will tell you to add lemon or something to it but if you don't like it or can't stand it after the first few sips/glasses then you are stuck with it. Instead use the flavor packets they make for individual bottles of water and add it as you go. You can always change the flavor if you need to.

3) Make that prep SUPER cold. Like - even if it's straight out of the fridge, add a few ice cubes to a glass of it and swirl it around for a bit to get it as cold as possible.

4) Drink it with a straw. You'll still taste it, but it won't stick around for a while on your lips like it will if you drink it straight from the glass.

5) CHUG! Don't sip, don't go slow, don't dilly-dally. Chug the glass full and have a slice of lemon or lime ready to suck on as soon as you finish it. Think of it like a tequila shot - the harsh lemon flavor will beat our the nasty prep flavor quickly.
*Note - remove allllll the seeds when you slice the lemon. Don't let a seed get accidentally sucked down - your GI will surely find it. LOL

6) Stay calm, stay at your house, and stay near a working toilet. If you can't make it through the entire jug, consider how well it is cleaning you out and be HONEST with the doctor when you get to your procedure. I can sometimes only make it through half of the prep, but when I describe the "output" he says I'm good to proceed.

Afterwards...

7) The gas pain can be nearly as bad as the procedure itself. There is a TON of air in there and it needs to come out. I do the "Superman" method - Lay on the floor with your arms over your head and your legs straight. Imagine you are Superman and you're flying. Keeping this general position, roll onto your left side for ~30 seconds. Slowly roll from your left to your belly and then keep rolling until you are on your right side. Hold for another 30 seconds. Keep repeating this (grab a pillow, the floor is hard) as much as you need to relieve the pressure.

LauraP
July 1st, 2019, 09:34 PM
The doctors insist my daughter does the whole "prep" thing even though she only has seven inches of her large colon remaining. Makes her so mad!!!! She's like they could use a rag to wipe it out. Oh the joys of medicine, NOT.

DeniseSm
July 2nd, 2019, 11:25 AM
Update: I received "moderate sedation" and everything went well. Less than a minute after the sedation injection and I don't remember a thing. Woke up in the recovery room. I was assured that receiving the "moderate sedation" kept all the insurance charges "in network"

They have greatly improved the prep procedure from my last time three years ago. I was given GaviLyte-G this time. Tastes horrible but less stressful to my innards (if you know what I mean)

Waiting on the biopsy results but the doctor thinks all polyps were benign again this time.

Patty J
July 2nd, 2019, 02:22 PM
Glad to hear that you had as good an experience as could be expected. Keeping in prayers that polyps are negative. Now take it easy for a while.

Anitamae56
July 2nd, 2019, 02:36 PM
Great news ! Was thinking of you this morning!