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sew-what2015
February 1st, 2019, 12:04 PM
Took this photo last summer. I liked the tree/shrub and , although I have never done any gardening I may want to get something like this if it is available. I would like to find out the name. It was about 5 1/2 ft. tall...maybe taller. Pics were taken in early October.

Navy Wife
February 1st, 2019, 12:17 PM
Looks like a Snowball, which is a large shrub. I will look up the official name later.

Caroline T.
February 1st, 2019, 12:26 PM
Hydrangea

I have a lovely blue one

Carlie Wolf
February 1st, 2019, 12:37 PM
There are tons of varieties out there, all beautiful. Lovely shrub, I was thinking of planting one this summer. Great for cut flowers too, most of the types can get quite large, so leave some space. People use to purchase the tiny shrubs and give them as a plant for Mothers Day. I kept hoping someone would get me one so I could plant it LOL

Carlie Wolf
February 1st, 2019, 12:39 PM
There are tons of varieties out there, all beautiful. Lovely shrub, I was thinking of planting one this summer. Great for cut flowers too, most of the types can get quite large, so leave some space. People use to purchase the tiny shrubs and give them as a plant for Mothers Day. I kept hoping someone would get me one so I could plant it LOL I believe they use to say that if you shifted the soil from acid to alkaline, or visa versa it shifts the color between pinks and blues. I'm not sure if that is still the case with newer varieties.

geegeequilts
February 1st, 2019, 03:45 PM
Please let us know what you find out. It sure is a beauty.

Gina

auntstuff
February 1st, 2019, 04:01 PM
There are different varieties of hydrangea and not all of them can color shift.

JCY
February 1st, 2019, 04:01 PM
I had one of those in my yard when I lived in Walla Walla, WA. We always called it a Snowball shrub.

sew-what2015
February 1st, 2019, 04:11 PM
My friend says it's a snowball bush but she didn't know the proper name for it. I looked on the internet and it seems there are different shrubs that are known as snowball bushes.

JCY
February 1st, 2019, 04:18 PM
I just did an internet search -- One of the articles was, "Difference Between Snowball Bush and Hydrangea." Lots of "hits" for both. The name is Snowball Viburnam. The colors for Hydrangea have to do with the acidity or alkalinity of the soil. Otherwise they are white.

Carlie Wolf
February 1st, 2019, 05:13 PM
This place has nice descriptions and pictures of a lot of varieties. https://www.waysidegardens.com/trees-and-shrubs/c/PT_1003_7/filter/100000001156eq100000001329/

I have purchased from them, not a lot, but some and have had no complaints.

grammaterry
February 1st, 2019, 05:51 PM
In regular soil the hydrangea is white but add lime or acidity and it will change colors. They can become purple, blue, pink...They like sun. Japanese beetles love them .

JCY
February 1st, 2019, 07:39 PM
Wow - I had no idea there were so many varieties of hydrangeas! Oh, Terry - Not good news that Japanese Beetles like them. My gr. dau. had a terrible time in Ill. with those beetles in her garden. They are voracious! I've never seen them in CO or when I lived in the Pac. NW.

chelea
February 1st, 2019, 08:13 PM
There are many varieties of hydrangeas and not all of them change color. It is important to know which variety you plant so you know when to prune. Some bloom on old wood which means you need to prune right after blooming. If you wait until the next spring to prune, you will cut off all the flower buds. Some bloom on new wood, so they can be pruned any time. Hydrangeas come in all shapes, sizes and colors...some like more shade, especially in the south. It pays to do a little research to get the perfect one for your garden.

Patty J
February 1st, 2019, 09:06 PM
Oh the things we learn from questions we didn't know to ask. Gardeners to the rescue. Thanks to all for the information.

MHG Winnower
February 2nd, 2019, 07:52 AM
Looking at the flowers and leaf and stem structure, that's Hydrangea 'Limelight' which is generally called a shrub, but they can be prunned as a small tree. https://www.provenwinners.com/plants/hydrangea/limelight-panicle-hydrangea-hydrangea-paniculata super plant in the right place (they have conditions like many plants for optimum growth). Have two of them that top out each year at about 7 feet loaded with blooms. I cut them back after blooming to about 18" high which is a practice which should be followed. They bloom on new wood each year. Great book on hydrangea: https://www.amazon.com/Hydrangeas-American-Gardens-Michael-Dirr/dp/0881926418 Here's an article I wrote in 2017 for the Master Gardeners Blog, you might find it useful. https://blogs.mcall.com/master_gardeners/2017/09/my-hydrangea-havent-bloomed-why.html

There are two flower arrangements in hydrangeas with corymb style inflorescences, which includes the commonly grown "bigleaf hydrangea"—Hydrangea macrophylla. Mophead flowers are large round flowerheads resembling pom-poms or, as the name implies, the head of a mop. (courtesy of Wikipedia)

sew-what2015
February 2nd, 2019, 10:53 AM
Wow! So many replies. I am grateful to all of you. So great to read all the comments and see the interest. Thank you.
I am getting excited about starting a garden... but oh...so much to learn! Hopefully, I will be able to start this spring if health issues stay under control. Meanwhile, I am going to join some gardening forums and order free plant nursery catalogs.

Looking at the flowers and leaf and stem structure, that's Hydrangea 'Limelight' which is generally called a shrub, but they can be prunned as a small tree. https://www.provenwinners.com/plants/hydrangea/limelight-panicle-hydrangea-hydrangea-paniculata super plant in the right place (they have conditions like many plants for optimum growth). Have two of them that top out each year at about 7 feet loaded with blooms. I cut them back after blooming to about 18" high which is a practice which should be followed. They bloom on new wood each year. Great book on hydrangea: https://www.amazon.com/Hydrangeas-American-Gardens-Michael-Dirr/dp/0881926418 Here's an article I wrote in 2017 for the Master Gardeners Blog, you might find it useful. https://blogs.mcall.com/master_gardeners/2017/09/my-hydrangea-havent-bloomed-why.html

There are two flower arrangements in hydrangeas with corymb style inflorescences, which includes the commonly grown "bigleaf hydrangea"—Hydrangea macrophylla. Mophead flowers are large round flowerheads resembling pom-poms or, as the name implies, the head of a mop. (courtesy of Wikipedia)

MHG Winnower......I think you have it. It's a Limelight hydrangea. I sent the pics to the botanical dept. of a university and they were quite helpful. They gave me some of the same info as you supplied and also gave me links to local resources where I can get help on best shrubs/plants for my area. They suggested I check out the plants/gardens in my area to see what others have successfully grown...makes sense. Will check out your article this evening. Thank you.

MHG Winnower
February 2nd, 2019, 11:59 AM
Wow! So many replies. I am grateful to all of you. So great to read all the comments and see the interest. Thank you.
I am getting excited about starting a garden... but oh...so much to learn! Hopefully, I will be able to start this spring if health issues stay under control. Meanwhile, I am going to join some gardening forums and order free plant nursery catalogs.


MHG Winnower......I think you have it. It's a Limelight hydrangea. I sent the pics to the botanical dept. of a university and they were quite helpful. They gave me some of the same info as you supplied and also gave me links to local resources where I can get help on best shrubs/plants for my area. They suggested I check out the plants/gardens in my area to see what others have successfully grown...makes sense. Will check out your article this evening. Thank you.

Don't know where you are located, but if you have a Land Grant University, they most likely have a Master Gardener Program. MG's are trained to help support the public with their gardening by providing researched-based information....and most of it is free!!! Maybe the folks at the botanical dept can answer whether or not there is an MG Program there. I'm also certified as a Pennsylvania Certified Horticulturist so boy am I glad that they concurred. It's often hard to tell from pics, but I was certain about this one. Nice to know I didn't embarrass myself.
Many land grant universities offer expertise like this one from Maryland: https://extension.umd.edu/learn/ask-gardening
First rule of thumb when you are going to start gardening is to have your soil tested so you know what the conditions are and can choose plant material appropriately, amend the soil, etc. Check whether your land grant university offers this service. Penn State does, and it's worth the $9!!! You always want to plant the right plant in the right place. Lots of dollars and energy goes into gardening. It's worth it and knowing the conditions when making choices is important. Success is best!

sew-what2015
February 2nd, 2019, 12:06 PM
Don't know where you are located, but if you have a Land Grant University, they most likely have a Master Gardener Program. MG's are trained to help support the public with their gardening by providing researched-based information....and most of it is free!!! Maybe the folks at the botanical dept can answer whether or not there is an MG Program there. I'm also certified as a Pennsylvania Certified Horticulturist so boy am I glad that they concurred. It's often hard to tell from pics, but I was certain about this one. Nice to know I didn't embarrass myself.

Thank you. I will check to see if there is a Land Grant University in the area.